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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Jill Wilkens

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of belonging to a same-sexuality social group or network for older lesbians and bisexual women.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of belonging to a same-sexuality social group or network for older lesbians and bisexual women.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 35 women were interviewed about a range of topics including coming out (or not) in the 1950s and 1960s, their feelings about ageing and their experiences of attending groups for lesbians and bisexual women, now and in the past.

Findings

The study found that, while the participants had different opinions of groups and their significance, the majority valued the opportunity to meet with other “like-minded” women and enjoyed a range of positive outcomes.

Practical implications

The nature of the space where such groups are located was significant to many as was the employment of paid leaders, not only to take up the administrative burden but to moderate and prevent cliques from forming.

Social implications

The research indicates that such groups have an important role to play in alleviating loneliness and promoting positive ageing.

Originality/value

This research makes an important contribution to the literature about lesbian, gay and bisexual ageing which is frequently focused on gay men. Their feelings about loneliness, the role of social space and groups are often different to those of lesbian and bisexual women such as my participants, particularly those who were at the cutting edge of second-wave feminism.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Abstract

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2021

Jennifer Cherneski

The purpose of this research is to reveal the gendered nature of social arrangements in order to bring to the surface the hidden discourses that mediate the opportunities…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to reveal the gendered nature of social arrangements in order to bring to the surface the hidden discourses that mediate the opportunities of women leaders in the field of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

The author uses critical sense-making (CSM) to analyze interviews with CSR leaders toward understanding the interconnected layers of influences they draw from as they make sense of their experiences.

Findings

Despite the positioning of women as being untapped resources within CSR, the reality within CSR leadership indicates that resilient, stereotypical social constructions of gender are being (re)created. However, cues can disrupt the ongoing process of sense-making and create shocks that represent opportunities for resistance as discriminatory practices are revealed.

Research limitations/implications

Applying CSM as a methodology and to the field of CSR adds a component to CSR and gender scholarship that is currently missing. CSM as a methodology bridges broader sociocultural discourses and the local site of sense-making, making visible the structures and processes that enable some narratives to become legitimized by the formative context and protect the status quo.

Social implications

If these leaders are able to use their discursive power to establish an alternate, dominant narrative throughout their organizations – a culture of emotional empathy within CSR – alternate meanings about the nature and purpose of CSR may emerge while highlighting the need for change.

Originality/value

Applying CSM as a methodology and to the field of CSR adds a component to CSR and gender scholarship that is currently missing. CSM as a methodology bridges broader sociocultural discourses and the local site of sense-making, making visible the structures and processes that enable some narratives to become legitimized by the formative context and protect the status quo.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

Kindie Tesfaye, Sika Gbegbelegbe, Jill E Cairns, Bekele Shiferaw, Boddupalli M Prasanna, Kai Sonder, Ken Boote, Dan Makumbi and Richard Robertson

The purpose of this study is to examine the biophysical and socioeconomic impacts of climate change on maize production and food security in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) using…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the biophysical and socioeconomic impacts of climate change on maize production and food security in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) using adapted improved maize varieties and well-calibrated and validated bioeconomic models.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the past climate (1950-2000) as a baseline, the study estimated the biophysical impacts of climate change in 2050 (2040-2069) and 2080 (2070-2099) under the A1B emission scenario and three nitrogen levels, and the socioeconomic impacts in 2050.

Findings

Climate change will affect maize yields across SSA in 2050 and 2080, and the extent of the impact at a given period will vary considerably between input levels, regions and maize mega environments (MMEs). Greater relative yield reductions may occur under medium and high-input intensification than under low intensification, in Western and Southern Africa than in Eastern and Central Africa and in lowland and dry mid-altitude than in highland and wet mid-altitude MMEs. Climate change may worsen food insecurity in SSA in 2050 through its negative impact on maize consumption and reduction in daily calorie intake. However, international trade has the potential to offset some of the negative impacts.

Originality/value

The study calibrated and applied bioeconomic models to estimate the biophysical and socioeconomic impact of climate change on maize production at fine resolution. The results could be used as a baseline to evaluate measures that will be applied to adapt maize to the future climate in SSA.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

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