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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Jill Shepherd

1056

Abstract

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Ashley Jill Shepherd, Julie Cowie and Michelle Beattie

The purpose of this paper is to determine the relative influence of the different domains of healthcare quality from the Care Experience Feedback Improvement Tool (CEFIT…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the relative influence of the different domains of healthcare quality from the Care Experience Feedback Improvement Tool (CEFIT) and identify key predictors of healthcare quality from the patients’ perspective. Measurement is necessary to determine whether the quality of healthcare is improving. The CEFIT was developed as a brief measure of patient experience. It is important to determine the relative influence of the different domains of healthcare quality to further clarify how the CEFIT can be used and identify key predictors of healthcare quality from the patients’ perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

In sum, 802 people with a healthcare experience during the previous 12 months were telephoned to complete the CEFIT questions and an additional 11-point global rating of patient experience. To estimate the influence of different domains of healthcare quality on patient overall ratings of quality of healthcare experience, the authors regressed the overall rating of patient experience with each component of quality (safety, effectiveness, timely, caring, enables system navigation and person-centred).

Findings

The authors found that all of the domains of the CEFIT influenced patient experience ratings of healthcare quality. Specifically, results show the degree of influence, the impact of demographics and how high scores for overall rating of patient experience can be predicted.

Originality/value

The findings suggest that all of the CEFIT domains are important in terms of capturing the wholeness of the patient experience of healthcare quality to direct local quality improvement.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 February 2019

Madeleine Lefebvre

Upcycling was introduced in The Archers by Fallon Rogers, who created a business from selling furniture she had upcycled. The author cites other examples from Archers

Abstract

Upcycling was introduced in The Archers by Fallon Rogers, who created a business from selling furniture she had upcycled. The author cites other examples from Archers episodes: Bert Fry’s egg mobile was originally an old caravan. Eddie Grundy built Lynda Snell’s shepherd’s hut from farmyard scrap. Josh Archer expanded his online farm equipment sales to include old items refurbished and sold for profit. Definitions of upcycling imply that the original item has become worthless. The author, however, includes examples of nostalgic value placed on relics of a bygone age and suggests a dichotomy between the values of older versus younger Ambridge residents. Upcycling can also be viewed in a metaphorical sense: Lilian Bellamy, for example, regularly upcycled herself with cosmetic assistance. The most sinister example is that of Rob Titchener, who used coercive control to upcycle Helen (then) Titchener into the image he wanted. The author concludes that while motives may take several forms, it is Fallon Rogers who consistently uses both creativity and business sense in her upcycling endeavours.

Details

Gender, Sex and Gossip in Ambridge
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-948-9

Book part
Publication date: 18 July 2006

Sarah Drakopoulou Dodd, Sarah Jack and Alistair Anderson

Although the literature addressing entrepreneurial networking is reaching a fairly high degree of sophistication and scope, there are certain critical areas where…

Abstract

Although the literature addressing entrepreneurial networking is reaching a fairly high degree of sophistication and scope, there are certain critical areas where important questions remain unanswered. Specifically, research into the processes of entrepreneurial networking has been hindered by a paucity of longitudinal studies. Thus, the consideration of change over time is de facto limited. Moreover, accounts of how individuals actually use networks to learn about entrepreneurship, its practices and processes remain sparse. Yet, we know that learning is a social process, so the research gap lies in relating networks, as social contexts to the entrepreneurial learning process. Furthermore, since social relations are fundamental to everyone's life, and emerge, develop and change throughout their life course, people are embedded in social situations that put them in touch with others (Kim & Aldrich, 2005). Consequently, learning is often “located in the relations among actors” (Uzzi & Lancaster, 2003, p. 398). As well as direct learning through network contacts, network transitivity also facilitates learning by one embedded network member, through the knowledge held by a second member, about a third, as shown in Uzzi and Gillespie's (2002) study. Accordingly, in many ways how entrepreneurs go about using their networks and with whom they network may be critical for entrepreneurship and thus warrants investigation. It is to this end that we now consider the shape, content and process of entrepreneurial networking.

Details

Entrepreneurship: Frameworks And Empirical Investigations From Forthcoming Leaders Of European Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-428-7

Content available
Article
Publication date: 26 November 2020

Jill Duncan

145

Abstract

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 3 July 2020

Jenna Jacobson

Social media management is an emerging profession that is growing as companies increasingly adopt social media. The purpose of this paper is to analyze social media…

17613

Abstract

Purpose

Social media management is an emerging profession that is growing as companies increasingly adopt social media. The purpose of this paper is to analyze social media managers’ personal branding.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth qualitative data is drawn from 20 semi-structured interviews with social media managers and supported by three years of orienting fieldwork in Toronto, Canada.

Findings

Social media managers are responsible for managing and executing organizations’ brands and presence on social media and digital platforms. As lead users of social media, social media managers provide critical insight into the emerging practices of personal branding on social media. “The future audience” is introduced to describe how individuals project a curated brand for all future unknown and unanticipated audiences, which emphasizes a professional identity. Due to workplace uncertainty, social media managers embody the mentality of being “always-on-the-job-market”, which is a driver for personal branding in their attempt to gain or maintain employment.

Originality/value

While personal branding is largely discussed by industry professionals, there is a need for empirical research on personal branding that examines how various employee groups experience personal branding. This research fills this gap by analyzing how people working in social media brand their identity and how their personal branding is used to market themselves to gain and maintain employment. The development of “the future audience” and “always-on-the-job-market” can be used to understand other professions and experiences of personal branding.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2009

Peter Chadwick, Sarah Morgan and Jerome Carson

In the first paper in this short series (Sen et al, 2009), we talked about the importance of having ‘recovery heroes’. There is a grave danger to the whole recovery…

Abstract

In the first paper in this short series (Sen et al, 2009), we talked about the importance of having ‘recovery heroes’. There is a grave danger to the whole recovery movement if it is colonised by mental health professionals and not owned by service users themselves (O'Hagan, 2008). This danger can be seen in attempts to conduct randomised controlled trials of ‘recovery interventions’, designed by professionals, who want to bring recovery practice into evidence‐based medicine. If it means anything, recovery is fundamentally an individual process. The recent Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health report (Shepherd et al, 2008), quotes Bill Anthony:‘Recovery … is a deeply personal, unique process of changing one's attitudes … involves the development of new meaning and purpose in one's life …’ (Anthony, 1993)Patricia Deegan also emphasises the person‐centred focus of recovery, ‘… recovery is an attitude, a stance, a way of approaching the day's challenges …’ (Deegan, 1996, p96). The most important evidence, to our minds, is that of individuals who are on the journey of recovery. Recovery heroes are courageous individuals who have made considerable progress along the path that few staff ever have to travel. We would like to introduce you to another one: Peter Chadwick.

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

Jill Kickul, Mark D. Griffiths, Colleen C. Robb and Lisa Gundry

Given the previous research on the disparities of lending rates and their relationship with lending institutions for women-owned and minority-owned businesses, the study…

93

Abstract

Purpose

Given the previous research on the disparities of lending rates and their relationship with lending institutions for women-owned and minority-owned businesses, the study poses the research question: How much Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) funding was distributed to women-owned and minority-owned businesses in comparison to other firms? Additionally, as the purpose of the PPP funding was to assist small businesses in retaining their workforce, the authors pose a second research question: Of those who received PPP funding, how many jobs on average were retained? And importantly related to our first research question, are there differences across gender and race in the average number of jobs retained?

Design/methodology/approach

This is one of the first empirical studies with an initial sample size of 661,218 loans from July 2020 that examines whether the United States PPP had the intended impact to save jobs in small businesses and to examine any reported differences across gender and race in loans issued and jobs saved.

Findings

The authors find that significant differences exist between women- and men-owned businesses across all five loan categories, with male-owned firms receiving over 80% of PPP loans. However, women-owned firms saved more jobs on average across all but the largest loan category. Significant differences were also found between minority- and White-owned businesses with minority-owned businesses generally saving more jobs on average across most loan categories.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of this study pertains to certain missing data that were not reported by participants. While a participant may have included their gender, they may not have included their race. Therefore, the varying sets of data may not be a reflection of the same individuals. Additionally, the industries were not included in this analysis, which may shed light on the job creation differences across gender and race.

Practical implications

Many of the industries that have been significantly impacted have been the tourism, restaurant and hospitality sectors, and knowing “where the money was allocated” can assist policymakers in allocating additional funds to those businesses, especially those who did not receive funding in the initial first waves of PPP.

Originality/value

This is one of the first empirical studies that examine over 600,000 loans and found that women-owned firms saved more jobs across all loan categories except the largest loans. Significant differences were also found between minority- and White-owned businesses with minority-owned businesses generally saving more jobs on average across most loan categories.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Joan Rapaport and Jill Manthorpe

The modernisation of mental health legislation took time in England and Wales, and resulted in an amendment to the law through the Mental Health Act 2007. The changes…

Abstract

The modernisation of mental health legislation took time in England and Wales, and resulted in an amendment to the law through the Mental Health Act 2007. The changes under way are extensive, and will affect the mental health workforce. This article outlines some of the changes and new roles, and argues that workforce changes are important features of the new legislation that confirm policy goals of integrated working and practice.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 May 2007

Rod Harradine and Jill Ross

The paper seeks to explore key differences in the perceptions of parents and children towards branding, examining differences and potential implications.

6175

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to explore key differences in the perceptions of parents and children towards branding, examining differences and potential implications.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was conducted over a six‐month period utilising focus groups, a school census and a parental survey to determine attitudes towards branding and to compare/contrast the different views and perceptions.

Findings

The study demonstrated a gap between the perceptions of parents and the actual brand awareness of their children. The research indicated that children tend to be brand aware at a younger age than their parents believe. Many parents assume that branding influences on their child come from outside the family, but this was contradicted by the children. The study indicated that children have a growing ability to receive information about brands and are able to use this knowledge to inform the growing influence that they exert in the buying process. Finally the study indicated that parents were concerned over the influence that branding can have. It is suggested that the growing sophistication of children in relation to branding issues results in them becoming much more brand‐wise when making purchase choices.

Research limitations/implications

The choice of methodology – a census of a specific school – minimised sampling limitations. The middle‐class catchment area may have produced some bias, and this could be addressed by replicating the research in different schools to allow a broader comparison of the findings.

Originality/value

The paper adds to existing knowledge and understanding of branding and purchase decision making with specific reference to contradictions between generations.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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