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Article
Publication date: 3 November 2020

Miriam Clare Dobson, Christian Reynolds, Philip H. Warren and Jill L. Edmondson

Participation in urban horticulture (UH) is increasing in popularity, and evidence is emerging about the wide range of social and environmental benefits “grow your own”…

Abstract

Purpose

Participation in urban horticulture (UH) is increasing in popularity, and evidence is emerging about the wide range of social and environmental benefits “grow your own” can also provide. UH can increase mental and physical well-being, as well as improve nature connectedness, social capital and community cohesion.

Design/methodology/approach

This study focusses on allotments, which is one of the dominant forms of UH that takes place in the United Kingdom. 163 volunteers in England and Wales participated in keeping a year-long allotment diary as part of a citizen science project investigating activities on allotment gardens. This study examines the unprompted comments that 96 of these gardeners offered as observations when visiting their allotment plots.

Findings

Participants recorded high levels of social and community activities including the sharing of surplus food produce, knowledge exchange, awareness and interaction with wildlife, emotional connection to their allotment, appreciation of time spent outside and aesthetic delight in the natural world around them.

Originality/value

At a time when waiting lists for allotment plots in the United Kingdom are on the rise, and allotment land is subject to multiple pressures from other forms of development, this study demonstrates that these spaces are important sites not only for food production but also health, social capital and environmental engagement.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Mark J. Lock, Amber L. Stephenson, Jill Branford, Jonathan Roche, Marissa S. Edwards and Kathleen Ryan

The Voice of the Clinician project commenced during an era when practitioner burnout, dissatisfaction, and turnover became an increasingly global health workforce concern…

1200

Abstract

Purpose

The Voice of the Clinician project commenced during an era when practitioner burnout, dissatisfaction, and turnover became an increasingly global health workforce concern. One key problem is clinical staff not being empowered to voice their concerns to decision-makers, as was found in this case study of an Australian public health organization. The following research question informed the present study: What is a better committee system for clinician engagement in decision-making processes? The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The Mid North Coast Local Health District in New South Wales aspired to improve engagement between frontline clinicians and decision-makers. Social network analysis methods and mathematical modeling were used in the discovery of how committees are connected to each other and subsequently to other committee members.

Findings

This effort uncovered a hidden organizational architecture of 323 committees of 926 members which overall cost 84,729 person hours and AUD$2.923 million per annum. Furthermore, frontline clinicians were located far from centers of influence, just 37 percent of committees had terms of reference, and clinicians reported that meeting agendas were not being met.

Practical implications

In response to the findings, a technological platform was created so that the board of directors could visually see all the committees and the connections between them, thus creating ways to further improve communication, transparency of process, and – ultimately – clinician engagement.

Originality/value

The breakthrough idea is that all organizational meetings can be seen as a system of engagement and should be analyzed to determine and describe the points and pathways where clinician voice is blocked.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 August 2014

Peter J Pronovost and Jill A Marsteller

– The purpose of this paper is to describe how a fractal-based quality management infrastructure could benefit quality improvement (QI) and patient safety efforts in health care.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe how a fractal-based quality management infrastructure could benefit quality improvement (QI) and patient safety efforts in health care.

Design/methodology/approach

The premise for this infrastructure comes from the QI work with health care professionals and organizations. The authors used the fractal structure system in a health system initiative, a statewide collaborative, and several countrywide efforts to improve quality of care. It is responsive to coordination theory and this infrastructure is responsive to coordination theory and repeats specific characteristics at every level of an organization, with vertical and horizontal connections among these levels to establish system-wide interdependence.

Findings

The fractal system infrastructure helped a health system achieve 96 percent compliance on national core measures, and helped intensive care units across the USA, Spain, and England to reduce central line-associated bloodstream infections.

Practical implications

The fractal system approach organizes workers around common goals, links all hospital levels and, supports peer learning and accountability, grounds solutions in local wisdom, and effectively uses available resources.

Social implications

The fractal structure helps health care organizations meet their social and ethical obligations as learning organizations to provide the highest possible quality of care and safety for patients using their services.

Originality/value

The concept of deliberately creating an infrastructure to manage QI and patient safety work and support organizational learning is new to health care. This paper clearly describes how to create a fractal infrastructure that can scale up or down to a department, hospital, health system, state, or country.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Jonathan C. Morris

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within…

29238

Abstract

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within and shows that these are in many, differing, areas across management research from: retail finance; precarious jobs and decisions; methodological lessons from feminism; call centre experience and disability discrimination. These and all points east and west are covered and laid out in a simple, abstract style, including, where applicable, references, endnotes and bibliography in an easy‐to‐follow manner. Summarizes each paper and also gives conclusions where needed, in a comfortable modern format.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 9/10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 21 May 2019

John N. Moye

Abstract

Details

Learning Differentiated Curriculum Design in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-117-4

Article
Publication date: 3 December 2020

Sarika Sharma, D.P. Goyal and Archana Singh

Sustainable entrepreneurship education (SEE) is a field, which mingles two imperative fields of research, sustainable entrepreneurship and entrepreneurship education. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainable entrepreneurship education (SEE) is a field, which mingles two imperative fields of research, sustainable entrepreneurship and entrepreneurship education. This emerging area has gained momentum in recent years, and various quantitative and qualitative studies are carried upon to explore its diverse dimensions, literature remains scattered. This paper aims to explore the holistic picture of SEE by compiling the research articles, through a systematic literature review of prior research studies.

Design/methodology/approach

Two prominent databases are considered, and these databases then are searched with appropriately designed search strings. Based on an exclusion and inclusion criteria developed by the authors, 59 research papers are selected for further investigation. These research papers are then studied rigorously for review and qualitative content analysis.

Findings

A conceptual framework comprising of the areas of these research contributions is proposed as an outcome. This framework provides insights about the existing state and areas of SEE research namely: (1) Institutional framework, (2) Teaching/learning approaches and (3) External interactions and provides further direction for research.

Research limitations/implications

The present study makes a significant contribution both in theoretical and in practical sense. (1) Compiled the extant literature on sustainable entrepreneurship education; (2) Developed a protocol to conduct the systematic review of literature on sustainable entrepreneurship education; (3) Reported the status of research on sustainable entrepreneurship education, and proposed a framework on existing work; (4) Presented the emerging topics, issues and challenges that need to be addressed in future research.

Originality/value

This article seeks to present a systematic literature review of the research field on sustainable entrepreneurship education. A review of existing literature in this field would certainly help to advance future research efforts as it presents a comprehensive picture of the status quo of this research field.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

Keywords

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