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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2018

Vicky Heap and Jill Dickinson

The purpose of this paper is to critically appraise the Public Spaces Protection Orders (PSPOs) policy that was introduced by the Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically appraise the Public Spaces Protection Orders (PSPOs) policy that was introduced by the Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act (2014). Within a designated area assigned by the local council, PSPOs can prohibit or require specific behaviours to improve the quality of life for people inhabiting that space. Those who do not comply face a fixed penalty notice of £100 or a fine of £1,000 on summary conviction. However, the practical and theoretical impact associated with the development of these powers has yet to be fully explored.

Design/methodology/approach

Using Bannister and O’Sullivan’s (2013) discussion of civility and anti-social behaviour policy as a starting point, the authors show how PSPOs could create new frontiers in exclusion, intolerance and criminalisation, as PSPOs enable the prohibition of any type of behaviour perceived to negatively affect the quality of life.

Findings

Local councils in England and Wales now have unlimited and unregulated powers to control public spaces. The authors suggest that this has the potential to produce localised tolerance thresholds and civility agendas that currently target and further marginalise vulnerable people, and the authors highlight street sleeping homeless people as one such group.

Originality/value

There has been little academic debate on this topic. This paper raises a number of original, conceptual questions that provide an analytical framework for future empirical research. The authors also use original data from Freedom of Information requests to contextualise the discussions.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 October 2019

Jill Dickinson

Abstract

Details

Journal of Property, Planning and Environmental Law, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9407

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2019

Jill Dickinson, Ellen Bennett and James Marson

Against a backdrop of austerity, characterised by public-sector funding cuts and a devolutionary agenda, this paper aims to explore how legislation might address two…

Abstract

Purpose

Against a backdrop of austerity, characterised by public-sector funding cuts and a devolutionary agenda, this paper aims to explore how legislation might address two inter-related challenges which public urban green space (“greenspace) faces in England and Wales, namely, responsibility for provision and identification of supporting funds. It focuses on two proposals: first, the introduction of legislative powers to enable local authorities to create user-charging schemes, and second, the imposition of a local authority statutory duty to provide greenspace.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting a traditional doctrinal approach, this exploratory study provides a synthesis and analysis of statutory materials.

Findings

While the study considers debates around user-charging schemes, it suggests that the imposition of a statutory duty to provide greenspace would provide a more equitable and effective solution.

Research limitations/implications

This paper calls for further research to establish the detail of such a statutory duty and how it might operate in practice.

Practical implications

There is an appetite amongst local authority stakeholders in England and Wales for such a statutory duty to better enable them to access the requisite underpinning funding.

Social implications

Imposing a statutory duty would help in protecting the well-established social, economic and environmental benefits associated with greenspace.

Originality/value

This multi-disciplinary research considers the inter-relationship between two key greenspace challenges: responsibility for provision and funding. It identifies and evaluates a potential model for imposing a greenspace statutory duty, which could address some of these issues.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Francis Sheridan King

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Law in the Built Environment, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1450

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Rajul Jain and Lawrence H. Winner

The purpose of this paper is to contribute an international perspective to corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainability (Sus) discussions by examining CSR/Sus…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute an international perspective to corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainability (Sus) discussions by examining CSR/Sus reporting practices of the 200 largest state-owned and private companies in India.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conduct a case study at the Danish carpet manufacturer EGE. The authors interpret the case from the perspective of pragmatic constructivism, which focusses on the integration of four dimensions: facts, possibilities, values, and communication.

Findings

The analyses showed that while most companies share CSR/Sus information through their websites they associate different levels of importance to this communication. However, the study found that overall the CSR/Sus climate in India is showing signs of positive reform.

Research limitations/implications

Being among the first, this study provides a framework for future studies to continue exploring CSR/Sus context in India, a country that despite its growing importance and influence has been largely ignored in the CSR/Sus literature.

Practical/implications

The study outlines the current CSR/Sus reporting trends and best practices in India that can help managers and organizations identify issues and topics that they could channel their resources and efforts into to maximize returns and benefits in this area.

Social/implications

This study provides insights into how corporations in an emerging and complex economy such as India are assuming roles of corporate citizens and are actively using web-based communication to engage and interact with stakeholders on issues that are of general concern.

Originality/value

The value of this study is in providing empirical insights into the strategies that Indian companies use to report on their CSR/Sus policies and commitments. The study is among the first to examine CSR in India from a sustainability perspective, and evaluate compliance with global reporting standards among top corporations.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Jill Manthorpe and Jo Moriarty

The purpose of this paper is to explore the equalities’ dimension of falls prevention services in light of the Equality Act 2010 and its protected characteristics…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the equalities’ dimension of falls prevention services in light of the Equality Act 2010 and its protected characteristics. Research and policy are discussed in light of the Act and public services’ duties to be aware of their responsibilities.

Design/methodology/approach

An initial research review was undertaken in 2012 and updated in 2016.

Findings

The research on falls prevention services does not always collect data on users of the service and services do not always collect data about their users that would enable them to build a picture of their users in line with the Equality Act 2010.

Practical implications

Services and commissioners will need to be able to show that the services funded by the public purse are accessible, acceptable and appropriate to the UK’s increasingly diverse older population. This paper describes some of the existing resources and research papers that contain elements of attention to the protected characteristics of the Equality Act 2010.

Originality/value

This is an update on a research review undertaken in 2012.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2008

Lisa Pinkney, Bridget Penhale, Jill Manthorpe, Neil Perkins, David Reid and Shereen Hussein

This article reports on the views of 92 social workers about their practice in adult protection in England and Wales as part of a wider study of adult protection working…

Abstract

This article reports on the views of 92 social workers about their practice in adult protection in England and Wales as part of a wider study of adult protection working and regulation that took place between 2004‐2007 in 26 sample local authorities. The article explores social workers' reported experiences of partnership or multiagency working and how this, along with overarching regulatory frameworks, affected their practice within and across agencies. Among findings from the study were that social workers considered that sharing information and responsibilities led to positive outcomes for service users and that the incorporation of different agency perspectives supplemented sharing of best practice.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2017

Prosenjit Giri, Jill Aylott and Karen Kilner

The purpose of this study was to explore which factors motivate doctors to engage in leadership roles and to frame an inquiry of self-assessment within Self-Determination…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to explore which factors motivate doctors to engage in leadership roles and to frame an inquiry of self-assessment within Self-Determination Theory (SDT) to identify the extent to which a group of occupational health physicians (OHPs) was able to self-determine their leadership needs, using a National Health Service (NHS) England competency approach promoted by the NHS England Leadership Academy as a self-assessment leadership diagnostic. Medical leadership is seen as crucial to the transformation of health-care services, yet leadership programmes are often designed with a top-down and centrally commissioned “one-size-fits-all” approach. In the UK, the Smith Review (2015) concluded that more decentralised and locally designed leadership development programmes were needed to meet the health-care challenges of the future. However, there is an absence of empirical research to inform the design of effective strategies that will engage and motivate doctors to take up leadership roles, while at the same time, health-care organisations continue to develop formal leadership roles as a way to secure medical leadership engagement. The problem is further compounded by a lack of validated leadership qualities assessment instruments which support researching this problem.

Design/Methodology/approach

The analysis draws on a sample of about 25 per cent of the total population size of the Faculty of Occupational Medicine (n = 1,000). The questionnaire used was the Leadership Qualities Framework tool as a form of online self-assessment (NHS Leadership Academy, 2012). The data were analysed using descriptive statistics and simple inferential methods.

Findings

OHPs are open about reporting their leadership strengths and leadership development needs and recognise leadership learning as an ongoing development need regardless of their level of personal competence. This study found that the single most important factor to affect a doctor’s confidence in leadership is their experience in a management role. In multivariate regression, management experience accounted for the usefulness of leadership training, suggesting that doctors learn best through applied “leadership learning” as opposed to theory-driven programmes. Drawing on SDT (Deci and Ryan, 1985; 2000; Ryan and Deci, 2000), this article provides a theoretical framework that helps to understand those doctors who are likely to engage in leadership and management activities in the organisation. More choice and self-determination of medical leadership programmes are likely to result in more relevant leadership learning that builds on doctors’ previous experience in this area.

Research limitations/implications

While this study benefitted from a large sample size, it was limited to the use of purely quantitative methods. Future studies would benefit from the application of a mixed methodology to combine quantitative data with one-to-one interviews or a focus group.

Practical implications

This study suggests that doctors are able to determine their own learning needs reliably and that they are more likely to increase their confidence in leadership and management if they are exposed to leadership and management experience.

Originality/value

This is the first large-scale study of this kind with a large sample within a single medical specialty. The study is considered as insider research, as the first author is an OHP with knowledge of how to engage OHPs in this work.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 December 2017

Steve Iliffe and Jill Manthorpe

The purpose of this paper is to explore the current interest in leadership within the National Health Service (NHS), especially within medicine, as a solution to the slow…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the current interest in leadership within the National Health Service (NHS), especially within medicine, as a solution to the slow rate of integration of health and social care services.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a conceptual analysis of policy documents and professional statements about leadership.

Findings

Leadership is a new common sense, promoted despite the limited evidence that it actually delivers. Leaders take risks, develop organisational vision and involve others in change using influence rather than hierarchic authority. They work together in ad hoc local networks, and, because leaders experience the work first hand, they are trusted by fellow professionals and bring to the organisation of work a flexible, immediate, policy-oriented dynamism and pragmatic adaptability.

Practical implications

This paper argues that the leadership movement represents a historic compromise between professionals (mostly medical) who want to shape decision making about service reconfiguration, and managers and politicians seeking ways to integrate health and social care services.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge this conceptual analysis is the first to be applied to leadership within the NHS.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2008

Jill Manthorpe and Steve Iliffe

This article is the first of a series on older people's mental health services (OPMH Focus 2008‐09). It sets out some of the challenges facing commissioners, and uses…

Abstract

This article is the first of a series on older people's mental health services (OPMH Focus 2008‐09). It sets out some of the challenges facing commissioners, and uses recommendations from a recent inquiry to outline possible commissioning objectives.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

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