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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2019

JiHye Park, JaeHong Park and Ho-Jung Yoon

When purchasing digital content (DC), consumers are typically influenced by various information sources on the website. Prior research has mostly focused on the individual…

Abstract

Purpose

When purchasing digital content (DC), consumers are typically influenced by various information sources on the website. Prior research has mostly focused on the individual effect of the information sources on the DC choice. To fill the gap in the previous studies, this research includes three main effects: information cascades, recommendations and word of mouth. In particular, the purpose of this paper is to focus on the interaction effect of information cascades and recommendations on the number of software downloads.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use the panel generalized least squares estimation to test the hypotheses by using a panel data set of 2,000 pieces of software at download.cnet.com over a month-long period. Product ranking and recommendation status are used as key independent variables to capture the effects of information cascades and recommendations, respectively.

Findings

One of this study’s findings is that information cascades positively interact with recommendations to influence the number of software downloads. The authors also show that the impact of information cascades on the number of software downloads is greater than one of the recommendations from a distributor does.

Originality/value

Information cascades and recommendations have been considered as the primary effects for online product choices. However, these two effects typically are not considered together in one research. As previous studies have mainly focused on each effect, respectively, the authors believe that this study may fill the gap by examining how these effects are interacted to one other to influence customers’ choices. The authors also show that the impact of information cascades on the number of software downloads is greater than one of the recommendations from a system does.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 43 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 27 June 2020

Jihye Park and Arim Kim

This study aims to examine the following issues: whether consumers use a dog’s facial expressions and gaze on a product’s packaging to interpret the emotions of a dog and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the following issues: whether consumers use a dog’s facial expressions and gaze on a product’s packaging to interpret the emotions of a dog and evaluate product quality and how owner identification with the dog moderates the effect of a dog’s facial expressions on product evaluations.

Design/methodology/approach

A field study and three lab experiments were conducted to examine the moderating roles of a dog’s gaze on the product package (Study 1) and owner–dog identification (Study 2) in the effect of facial expressions of a dog on product evaluations.

Findings

Results showed that the facial expressions of a dog presented on the product package influenced the perceived mood of a dog and product quality evaluation. The effects of the facial expressions were strengthened when the dog looked at the front. Furthermore, those who were more likely to identify with their dog tended to be more responsive to the dog with a smiling face and evaluated the product quality more positively than those who were less likely to identify with their dog.

Practical implications

Marketing practitioners in the pet industry can use the findings of this study to select and place an appropriate pet image on the product package. Happy facial expressions and the direct gaze of a pet can influence positive evaluations of a product and, as a result, increase the purchase intention. Product managers also can place words, phrases or images on the product package that highlight a dog as an inseparable part of the owner’s everyday life and as a representation of his/her identity. Emphasizing the owner’s dog as an extension of him/herself or a part of his/her identities can encourage the active processing of a dog’s facial expressions on the product package and the positive evaluation of a product.

Originality/value

The present work adds valuable empirical findings to the limited marketing literature for the pet-related industry. The results of the experiments showed how consumers process the facial expressions and gaze of a dog and use them to infer the quality of a product. Furthermore, the findings extend prior literature reporting that dog owners with a greater identification are more likely to humanize their pet dogs and develop empathetic abilities.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Jihye Park and Yoon Jin Ma

This study aims to investigate the following three issues: whether consumers process numeric information with locational cues, which locations (horizontal vs vertical) are…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the following three issues: whether consumers process numeric information with locational cues, which locations (horizontal vs vertical) are more influential in processing numbers and whether a number-location association is weakened or strengthened when a visual reference frame moves up or down.

Design/methodology/approach

A field study and a series of three lab experiments were conducted to examine the location effect of numeric information on the package façade on the perceived magnitude of a number.

Findings

The authors found that a number at the right was perceived as larger than one at the left only when the number is located at the bottom. Also, placing numeric information at the bottom rather than the top of a product package façade was more powerful in processing the numeric information, but this is true only when the visual frame is set lower.

Practical implications

This study provides practical insights for product managers in placing core numeric information on product packaging to effectively communicate product value to consumers. Optimal locations can be deliberately considered along with types of numeric information and product categories. For healthy products that promote fewer calories, the top area of the package façade may be a better position for placing information on calories per serving to make the product more appealing to those who follow a healthy diet. Heavier, more voluminous products (e.g., refrigerator) better position their volume/weight information at the bottom than at the top or at the right of the bottom than at the left of the bottom on the product facade. Either the left side or right side of the top position may be beneficial for thinner, lightweight products (e.g., television).

Originality/value

The present work adds valuable empirical findings; inconsistent with past research, left-right location-number associations are not always true. People tend to associate smaller numbers with left-side locations and larger numbers with right-side locations only when the number is located at the bottom. Also, the study reported that top-small, bottom-large associations are not always true. The difference in perceived magnitude of the number between a number at the top and one at the bottom within the visual frame is significant only when the visual frame is set close to the ground.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 22 October 2020

Dong Woo Ko and Jihye Park

The purpose of this research is to examine the effects of congruence between the ideal self-image of a game player and the game character on identification and interaction…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine the effects of congruence between the ideal self-image of a game player and the game character on identification and interaction with the game character, perceived game power and performance, character attachment and willingness to spend money on the game character.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 347 online game players participated in an online survey posted via the nationwide crowdsourcing web service Mechanical Turk in the US. A structural equation modelling was conducted using a maximum-likelihood estimation procedure to test the relationships among the variables.

Findings

The results revealed a significant positive impact of congruence between a game character and the ideal self-image of a game player on identification and interaction with the game character, perceived game power, game performance, attachment to the game character and willingness to spend money on the game character.

Originality/value

Although significant research has been conducted in the area of online gaming, limited attention has been given to the strategic game content that stimulates a player's intention to purchase game items. Due to the challenges in sales growth in the game industry caused by business model shifts from a subscription-based model to a free-to-play one, it is important for marketing practitioners to motivate game players to continue playing the game and purchase game items. The results of this study provide valuable strategic insights to overcome the limitations of existing marketing strategies in the online game business.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Jaya Halepete and Jihye Park

This study aims to provide competitive e‐tailing strategies for fair trade organizations using a benchmarking approach.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide competitive e‐tailing strategies for fair trade organizations using a benchmarking approach.

Design/methodology/approach

A coding guide was developed to obtain information available on 28 fair trade web sites and 28 commercial web sites focusing on company information, product information, distribution channels, customer service, and web site structure/media service.

Findings

Results revealed several evidences that fair trade organizations presented limited information online, compared with commercial organizations.

Research limitations/implications

Fewer commercial retailers benchmarked in the study sold handicrafts, compared with fair trade organizations. Discrepancies in the proportion of products carried by each organization may result in limited generalization of the findings across product categories.

Practical implications

Through benchmarking against profit‐making business leaders, fair trade organizations would be able to evaluate strengths and weaknesses for their current online business operations and explore opportunities and improvement in web site management.

Originality/value

This paper provides valuable managerial implications for fair trade organizations focusing on web site operations. Information availability and strategic web site management can attract customers to make purchases on fair trade web sites and, in turn, enable organizations to sustain and grow in the competitive marketplace.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Jihye Park and Leslie Stoel

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of brand familiarity, the number of pieces of product information presented on a web site, and previous online apparel…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of brand familiarity, the number of pieces of product information presented on a web site, and previous online apparel shopping experience on perceived risk and purchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

The experiment was 2 (brand familiarity)×2 (information availability) factorial design and 166 students participated in this study.

Findings

Multivariate and univariate analyses found a significant effect of brand familiarity and previous experience on perceived risk and purchase intention, and no effect of amount of information on perceived risk and purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

Participants may not have carefully considered the product information because the experiment was not an actual purchase situation, although a scenario was given. In future studies, creating an actual purchase situation may be necessary to investigate the effect of the amount of information available on the web sites on perceived risk and decision making.

Practical implications

The present study suggests that internet retailers should capitalize on the power of their brand names. Multi‐channel retailers may be able to derive significant advantages from brand familiarity among their customers.

Orginality/value

This study has added to the in‐home shopping literature by extending findings of previous research to internet shopping. Findings suggest that internal information, specifically familiarity with brands offered online and previous experience of shopping online, influence perceptions of risk associated with shopping online, as well as intentions to purchase online.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2009

Jihyun Kim, Yoon Jin Ma and Jihye Park

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of ease of use, usefulness, and enjoyment, and subjective norm regarding the use of mobile phones on US consumers'…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of ease of use, usefulness, and enjoyment, and subjective norm regarding the use of mobile phones on US consumers' attitudes toward mobile communication and mobile commerce, and mobile technology use intention for shopping.

Design/methodology/approach

This work integrates the technology acceptance model of Davis and Fishbein and Ajzen's theory of reasoned action for its theoretical framework. In total, 341 college students in two large US universities provided usable responses. Structural equation modeling was employed to test the proposed model and research hypotheses.

Findings

The results showed that the perceived ease of use, usefulness, and enjoyment, and subjective norm were the significant predictors of attitudes toward mobile communication and mobile commerce as well as mobile technology use intention for shopping. The findings also suggested that attitude toward mobile communication positively influenced attitude toward mobile commerce, which in turn positively influenced mobile technology use for shopping.

Research limitations/implications

The sample of this study is slightly biased by gender and age. However, this demographic segment is meaningful to examine consumer attitudes and mobile technology use intentions for fashion goods due to its extensive usage of mobile services.

Originality/value

This study offers an integrated theoretical framework for future studies investigating consumer behavior in a technologically advanced retail environment.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Jayoung Choi and Jihye Park

To examine shopping orientation, information search, and demographics of multichannel customers in comparison to traditional single channel customers.

Abstract

Purpose

To examine shopping orientation, information search, and demographics of multichannel customers in comparison to traditional single channel customers.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was used to assess research variables and mailed out to 10,000 individuals in South Korea who were randomly selected from a purchased national database. A total of 2,926 usable questionnaires were returned for a 29 percent response rate.

Findings

Shopping orientation, information search, and demographics differentiated shopper groups: single‐channel offline users, single‐channel online users, multichannel offline users, and multichannel online users.

Research limitations/implications

A lack of theoretical approaches, a direct self‐assessment for store choice behavior, and duplicated measures for independent and dependent variables perhaps limit its usefulness.

Practical implications

Provides guidance to global retailers who plan to pioneer new markets with multichannel retailing strategies. Shopping orientations, perceived usefulness of information sources, and demographics can be effectively used to identify target markets in Korea.

Originality/value

This study first explored Korean consumer profiles in the context of multi‐shopping channels and added valuable empirical findings to the current limited literature in multichannel retailing in the international market and to help global retailers identify consumer segments based on channel choice behavior.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Jihyun Kim and Jihye Park

The purpose of this study is to examine the consumer shopping channel extension focusing on attitude shift from offline to online store with a theoretical approach.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the consumer shopping channel extension focusing on attitude shift from offline to online store with a theoretical approach.

Design/methodology/approach

Two hundred and sixty two students in a large US midwestern university participated and provided usable survey responses. Structural equation modeling was employed to test hypotheses and the modified theory of planned behavior in the online retailing environment.

Findings

The results showed that attitude toward the offline store was a significant predictor of attitude toward the online store. In addition, search intention for product information via the online store was the strongest predictor of consumer's purchase intention via the online store as well as a mediating variable between predictor variables and purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

The sample of this study was slightly biased by gender and age. Female college‐aged consumers were the majority. This demographic group is, however, meaningful to investigate for apparel multichannel retailers due to the strong consumer demand and buying power.

Originality/value

This paper offered a theoretical framework to understand and predict the consumer shopping behavior in the multichannel retailing setting. In addition, the present paper contributed to the academia by expanding the theory of planned behavior and online prepurchase intentions model.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2007

Kun Song, Ann Marie Fiore and Jihye Park

The purpose of this paper is to explore the roles of telepresence and fantasy in an online apparel shopping experience. Online apparel consumers undergo a virtual product…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the roles of telepresence and fantasy in an online apparel shopping experience. Online apparel consumers undergo a virtual product experience (telepresence) that simulates the product experience in a brick‐and‐mortar store. Fantasy entails the pleasurable mental imagery involving product use.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 86 female university students completed a survey after browsing a stimulus web site in a laboratory setting. Path analysis was used to identify hypothesized relationships between telepresence, fantasy, shopping enjoyment, willingness to purchase, and willingness to patronize the online retailer.

Findings

Results showed that telepresence influenced consumer fantasy and both telepresence and consumer fantasy led to shopping enjoyment (experiential value). Telepresence, fantasy, and shopping enjoyment directly contributed to willingness to purchase from the online retailer, whereas telepresence, fantasy and shopping enjoyment contributed indirectly to willingness to patronize the online retailer.

Research limitations/implications

The study used a sample of female university students in the USA. This limits its generalizability to all consumers. It also examined one web site feature; other features may produce different effects.

Practical implications

Findings suggest that business practitioners implement features on their web sites to yield telepresence and fantasy, which may enhance purchase and patronage responses towards their site.

Originality/value

This study enhances understanding of two variables requiring further study, telepresence and fantasy, in online apparel shopping experience.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

1 – 10 of 31