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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

EunSol Her, Soobin Seo, Jihee Choi, Victor Pool and Sanja Ilic

The purpose of this paper is to examine food safety behaviors of consumers and employees at university food courts.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine food safety behaviors of consumers and employees at university food courts.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a smartphone-based observation technique, a total of 149 consumers and 34 employees were observed at three food courts at a mid-western university in the USA. The observational tool recorded 30 sequential transactions of each individual, allowing researchers to identify the compliance rate to the rubric. Both descriptive statistics and multivariate analysis of variance were used for data analysis.

Findings

This study found a low compliance rate of food safety practices among consumers and employees at university food courts. Consumers’ food safety practices varied depending on gender, observed ethnicity and party size, while none of those factors was significant for employees. Specifically, females, Caucasians, and lone diners showed higher non-compliance rates than those of males, non-Caucasians and group diners.

Research limitations/implications

The results of the study raise the pressing needs of developing effective risk communication strategies at university food courts for both consumers and employees in order to reduce the potential risk of foodborne illness outbreaks.

Originality/value

University food courts are not only major foodservice operations for on-campus populations as well as off-campus visitors and the local public, but also the presence of shared dining area pertains the potential risk of foodborne illnesses. However, lack of attention has been paid to the food safety issues at university food courts, and especially food safety behaviors of consumers. This study extended the knowledge of previous food safety literature by adopting a smartphone-based observation technique and developing a rubric customized for consumers and employees at university food courts.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Jihee Choi and Soobin Seo

This study aims to investigate consumer responses to cause-related marketing (CRM) implemented by socially stigmatized industries, especially in fast food restaurants.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate consumer responses to cause-related marketing (CRM) implemented by socially stigmatized industries, especially in fast food restaurants.

Design/methodology/approach

This experimental study uses a 2 (degree of perceived fit) × 2 (complementary fit) × 2 (brand equity) between-subjects design.

Findings

Results show significant interaction effects between the degree of fit and brand equity and complementary fit and brand equity on consumers’ brand evaluation. When a company with high brand equity chooses a high fit (vs low fit) or complementary fit (vs non-complimentary fit) for CRM promotion, this leads to consumers’ more positive attitude and higher intent to participate in CRM promotion.

Practical implications

This study provides practical implications for designing effective CRM promotion in the stigmatized industry such as fast food restaurants and casino.

Originality/value

Given the increased demand on CRM in the hospitality industry, the paper contributes to extend the realm of CRM literatures by investigating antecedents affecting consumers’ responses toward the CRM in the stigmatized companies or brands.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2020

Michael Daniel Clemes, David L. Dean and Thongkern Thitiya

This research develops and tests a comprehensive hierarchical model of the behavioural intentions of day spa customers.

Abstract

Purpose

This research develops and tests a comprehensive hierarchical model of the behavioural intentions of day spa customers.

Design/methodology/approach

The primary data was collected from the customers of 17 day spas throughout Thailand. EFA and SEM were used to analyse the data and test the interrelationships among service quality, customer satisfaction, perceived value, perceived switching costs and behavioural intentions. A third-order conceptualisation of service quality is also included in the modelling framework.

Findings

Customer satisfaction is the key determinant of behavioural intentions. Service quality and perceived value are two important descriptors of customer satisfaction. Service quality is the most important determinant of customer satisfaction, and customer satisfaction is the most significant antecedent of behavioural intentions. Service quality is a significant determinant of perceived value and perceived switching costs. Customer satisfaction plays a partial mediating role on the relationship between service quality and behavioural intentions and between perceived value and behavioural intentions.

Originality/value

There is a conceptual gap in the literature as no published empirical research on the day spa industry has comprehensively modelled the behavioural intentions of day spa customers. The comprehensive hierarchical modelling approach used in this study provides a complete and integrative analysis of the constructs under investigation in a day spa context and closes the research gap.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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