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Article

Jieun Kim, Sungjoo Lee and Yongtae Park

The purpose of this paper is to propose the use of a user-centric service map to facilitate the visual exploration and monitoring of user context information for proactive…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose the use of a user-centric service map to facilitate the visual exploration and monitoring of user context information for proactive market analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper supports a context-based market analysis by developing a user-centric service map which comprehensively visualizes a variety of contexts, users, and services. Empirical data were gathered from service descriptions and reviews of 100 mobile application services in the Apple App Store’s lifestyle and healthcare and fitness categories.

Findings

The user-centric service map supports the analysis of the context information from using various mobile app services, and can therefore be effectively applied for market-segment analysis and user-value analysis.

Practical implications

The user-centric service map involves implications in terms of multi-disciplinary proactive market orientation and data-driven strategy development, allowing firms to respond to changing market conditions in the mobile business promptly and even preemptively.

Originality/value

The initiative uncovering of latent needs through examining context of use have been an important focus of prior work, but little attempt has been presented in the way of frameworks for converting abundant context data into strategic information. The paper provides new methods and procedures to establish and interpret service maps using flexible visual features.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 54 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article

Ju-Young M. Kang and Jieun Kim

Despite the importance of incorporating social media with customer relationship management (CRM), the implementation of social CRM is still in its initial stages for a…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the importance of incorporating social media with customer relationship management (CRM), the implementation of social CRM is still in its initial stages for a majority of green brands. The purpose of this paper is to examine whether consumers’ perception-based factors of the online CRM tactics through social media (i.e. perceived marketer-dominated information quality, perceived interaction quality, and perceived service content quality in social media) offered by the green brand were related to the perceived customer retention orientation (CRO) of the green fashion retailer, which was related to patronage intention towards the green retailer, and the moderating effect of green consciousness on the link between perceived CRO of the green retailer and patronage intention.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from social media users (n=631) using a consumer panel via an online survey. Structural equation modelling was employed to test the proposed model and research hypotheses.

Findings

This study found that the perceived CRO of the green retailer was positively related to patronage intention. The perceived marketer-dominated information quality and perceived service content quality in social media were positively related to the perceived CRO of the green retailer. Green consciousness moderated the link between perceived CRO and patronage intention.

Originality/value

First, this study contributes to the further theoretical understanding of the underlying factors that influence customer perception of the CRO of the green retailer and green patronage intention. Second, on a managerial level, this proposed model provides green retailers with beneficial insights into the development of successful social CRM.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article

Juanjuan Wu, Hae Won Ju, Jieun Kim, Cara Damminga, Hye-Young Kim and Kim K.P. Johnson

The purpose of this research was to investigate the effect of three virtual fashion stores using product display methods dominant by colour, visual texture and style…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research was to investigate the effect of three virtual fashion stores using product display methods dominant by colour, visual texture and style coordination on consumers' retailer interest, retail pleasure, perception of merchandise quality, patronage intention, and purchase behaviour to provide empirically tested, actionable product display methods to visual merchandising researchers and practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used mixed methods for this exploratory study, combining experimental and focus group methods to gather data. For the experiment, data were collected via a between-subjects design reflecting manipulation of three variables (i.e. colour, style coordination, visual texture). After the experiment, participants completed a self-administered online questionnaire. A segment of the participants also participated in focus group discussions of the virtual stores.

Findings

Participants who shopped in the style coordination store spent significantly more money than those who shopped in colour or visual texture stores. Participants who shopped in the colour store experienced significantly more retail pleasure and showed significantly higher patronage intention than those who shopped in the visual texture and style coordination stores; and they showed more retailer interest than subjects in the visual texture store. Retail pleasure and interest were found to mediate the link between methods of product display and patronage intention. Participants' fashion involvement moderated the relationship between fashion product display methods and retail interest.

Originality/value

This research is one of the first to create three virtual stores featuring product display methods dominant by colour, visual texture, and style coordination using 3D technology – a Mockshop software package. The effect of these different display methods on shoppers' reactions and responses was tested, which provided actionable results for visual merchandising practitioners, not only in the physical but also in the virtual store environment.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 41 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article

Jieun Kim and Jae-Eun Kim

The purpose of this paper is to investigate what values luxury customers may seek to fulfill during their interaction with salespersons and how perceived value fulfillment…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate what values luxury customers may seek to fulfill during their interaction with salespersons and how perceived value fulfillment may impact salesperson loyalty and store loyalty. The paper also examines the moderating effect of the degree of friendship with a salesperson.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a survey using a close-ended questionnaire. In total, 22 luxury fashion brand stores located in eight of the largest department stores in Seoul, Korea, were selected as the luxury fashion retail context for the research. A total of 220 questionnaires were used for data analysis.

Findings

Fulfillment of self-oriented values had a significant positive influence on store loyalty and fulfillment of stimulation had a significant positive influence on salesperson loyalty. There was significant interaction effect between stimulation and degree of friendship on salesperson loyalty.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study provide practical implications in the management of customer relationship. An emphasis on qualities of luxury products that are linked to the fulfillment of self-oriented and/or personal values such as superior quality or ability to gain emotional benefits should be warranted for success as a luxury brand or a luxury retailer.

Originality/value

This research is important as it can inform luxury salesperson on how to better meet customer's psychological needs in the context of a selling situation; ultimately contribute to their salesperson loyalty and loyalty to the brand.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article

Jae‐Eun Kim and Jieun Kim

The purpose of this paper is to present a comprehensive review of the body of literature concerning human factors in retail environments and their influence on consumers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a comprehensive review of the body of literature concerning human factors in retail environments and their influence on consumers. Additionally, the authors identify the research gaps in the literature and suggest directions for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses qualitative approaches to provide a comprehensive review of human factors in retail environments.

Findings

The review is synthesised based on two main categories: the effects of other customers and the effects of sales associates. The influence of other customers, including the number of customers and social relations, is a significant source of human‐related environmental cues. In addition, existing studies support the importance of the number of sales associates, sales associates' physical attributes, and their behavioural characteristics observed in stores.

Practical implications

This study suggests that retailers need to effectively manage, control and manipulate human‐related environmental factors in order to generate a positive influence on consumers' perceptions towards stores and their behaviours.

Originality/value

This study provides a conceptual framework that integrates various human‐related factors in retail environments and their significant insights in the effective management of these factors identified for researchers and retailers.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 40 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article

Jieun Kim and Kim K. Johnson

The purpose of this paper is to improve the original Brand Luxury Index (BLI) developed by Vigneron and Johnson to provide a practical tool for assessing consumer’s…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to improve the original Brand Luxury Index (BLI) developed by Vigneron and Johnson to provide a practical tool for assessing consumer’s perception of the luxurious of a brand.

Design/methodology/approach

The original BLI was revised through three stages: an initial scale-item generation employing a qualitative method (i.e. focus group interviews), scale purification process using statistical techniques (i.e. exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA)), and scale verification process using CFA. Data (249 for scale purification, 253 for scale validation) were collected with the help of E-rewards, a marketing research company.

Findings

The modified BLI contains five dimensions (i.e. quality, extended-self, hedonism, accessibility, and tradition). The number of the dimensions remained the same as the original conceptualization (i.e. conspicuousness, uniqueness, quality, hedonism, extended-self), however, the contents of those dimensions differed.

Practical implications

The modified BLI can be used to monitor and manage a prestige brand in the market place. Not only can marketers of prestige brands use the index to assess consumers’ perception of the luxuriousness of their brands but also to position their brand along the desired dimension of luxuriousness.

Originality/value

The modified BLI can be used to measure marketing performance of luxury brands.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article

Jieun You, Seonghye Kim, Keunho Kim, Ahro Cho and Wonsup Chang

Human resource development (HRD) research and practice mostly have focused on performance improvement although HRD fundamentally pursues human development as a whole. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Human resource development (HRD) research and practice mostly have focused on performance improvement although HRD fundamentally pursues human development as a whole. The purpose of this study is to conceptualize meaningful work in the context of HRD and provide implications for HRD research and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This study reviewed the literature on topics such as meaningful work, the meaning of work, workplace spirituality, the value of work and work as a calling, to understand the concept of meaningful work. In addition, this study reviewed existing studies on meaningful work in HRD journals to investigate the current status of meaningful work research within the field of HRD. This study reviewed the related literature such as meaningful work, the meaning of work, workplace spirituality, the value of work and work as a calling, to understand the concept of meaningful work. In addition, this study reviewed the existing studies on meaningful work in HRD journals to investigate the current status of meaningful work research in HRD.

Findings

The findings of this study identified three main themes in conceptualizing meaningful work, namely, positivity; significance and purpose; and human fulfillment. The authors also suggest that the meaningful work discourse in HRD expands a research boundary of HRD and enables a holistic approach to HRD research and practice.

Research limitations/implications

For future research, the authors recommend that HRD research deepens its understanding of meaningful work and its related concepts. They also recommend studies pursuing empirical evidence to reveal the significance of meaningful work.

Originality/value

Given the limited studies on meaningful work in HRD and a lack of understanding of meaningful work, this study proposes a comprehensive understanding of meaningful work, especially within the HRD context. This study also suggests a holistic approach to HRD by stressing a humanistic perspective beyond the performance-oriented HRD.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 45 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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Article

Yonjoo Cho, Sehoon Kim, Jieun You, Hanna Moon and Hyoyong Sung

Global gender diversity and equality indexes have been developed to promote gender diversity and equality at the country level, but it is difficult to see how those…

Abstract

Purpose

Global gender diversity and equality indexes have been developed to promote gender diversity and equality at the country level, but it is difficult to see how those indexes are applied to organizations on a daily basis. The purpose of this study is to examine the application of environmental, social and governance (ESG) measures for gender diversity and equality at the organizational level in a Korean context.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the institutional theory, the authors reviewed ESG measures for gender diversity and equality of women funds in four countries (USA, Canada, UK and Japan) and examined The Women Fund in Korea through document analysis and interviews.

Findings

ESG measures in four countries’ women funds mainly assessed the percentage of women in the workforce, on boards and in leadership positions. In The Women Fund, gender diversity indicators consider the ratio of female to male employees, while gender equality indicators take into account gaps of male and female salaries and positions. This study’s impact analysis indicates that the companies invested in by The Women Fund had higher return on assets and return on equity than those without the fund.

Research limitations/implications

Although women funds explored in this study exemplify the use of ESG measures to apply global gender diversity and equality indexes at the organizational level, research is needed to examine ESG measures and women funds and their associations. Possible topics include what needs to be measured in ESG, who should be involved, how ESG measures should be applied, what outcomes of using ESG measures would ensue in organizations and how ESG measures relate to regional and global gender diversity.

Practical implications

In promoting ESG measures that apply global gender diversity and equality at the organizational level, human resource development practitioners, as change agents, can help organizations develop socially responsible and ethical behaviors and transform organizational culture, practice and systems, which may influence organizations’ long-term survival and development as well as financial performance.

Social implications

As the government’s support and policies guide and drive firms to develop and implement initiatives and programs, the launch and implementation of gender diversity and equality at the organizational level in the form of women funds require a certain level of collaboration between the government and the private sector.

Originality/value

This study on the application of ESG measures for global gender diversity and equality at the organizational level in the form of women funds is timely to engage organizations in dialogue regarding what needs to be done to promote women’s participation and leadership roles in organizations in Korea and other countries.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article

Yonjoo Cho, Jiwon Park, Soo Jeoung “Crystal” Han, Boreum Ju, Jieun You, Ahreum Ju, Chan Kyun Park and Hye Young Park

The purpose of this study was to compare South Korean female executives’ definitions of career success with those of male executives, identify their career development…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to compare South Korean female executives’ definitions of career success with those of male executives, identify their career development strategies for success and provide implications for research and practice. Two research questions guiding our inquiry included: How do female executives’ definitions of career success differ from those of male executives? What career development strategies do male and female executives use for career success?

Design/methodology/approach

A basic qualitative research design was used and semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 male executives and 15 female executives in diverse corporations by using an interview protocol of 13 questions regarding participants’ background, definitions of career success and final thoughts. To analyze the interview data, we used both NVivo 11 and a manual coding method.

Findings

Gender differences were detected in the participants’ definitions of career success and success factors. As previous studies indicated, male and female executives had different perspectives on career success: men tended to define career success more objectively than women. Many male executives, through experiencing transforming changes in their careers, began to appreciate work–life balance and personal happiness from success. Gender differences were also detected in their career development challenges, meanings of mentors and networking activities. While work stress surfaced as a challenge that men faced, experiencing the token status in the gendered workplace was a major challenge for female participants.

Research limitations/implications

In this study, three research agendas are presented, needing further investigation on career success, women’s token status and comparative analyses.

Practical implications

Three implications for practice have been provided, including organizational support, government’s role and HRD’s role.

Originality/value

Gender differences in this study were not as distinctive as previous literature has indicated. Some male executives valued more subjective career success than others, while a few female executives spoke of more objective definitions than others. These subtle differences could be captured through in-depth interviews. By hearing the participants’ stories, both objective and subjective definitions of success, for both genders, could be observed, which might not have been possible in quantitative research. In addition, the study findings reflect the nature of a uniquely Korean context. The participants worked in a Confucian and military culture, which operates in hierarchical structures and the command and control system, coupled with a heightened camaraderie spirit in the workplace.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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Article

Ga Eun Yeo, Mi-Sook Cho and Jieun Oh

As the risks associated with sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) increase, various policies require sugar to be reduced in beverages. This paper segmented consumers according…

Abstract

Purpose

As the risks associated with sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) increase, various policies require sugar to be reduced in beverages. This paper segmented consumers according to food-related lifestyle (FRL), analyzed beverage selection attributes and preference for sugar-reduced beverages (SRBs) for each group and presented basic data for the strategies of SRBs for each consumer group.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 1,000 Korean consumer panels responded to the online survey. The questionnaire consisted of FRL, beverage selection attributes and attitude toward SRBs.

Findings

Consumer groups were divided according to FRL: rational, value seeking and careless consumer. Rational consumers tended to be in their 30s or 50s and women, and they focused on product quality/hygiene when choosing beverages. Value seeking consumers were mainly in their 40s and 50s and were characterized by high education and income. They showed high scores in quality/hygiene, economy and sensory traits. Careless consumers were more likely to be in their 20s–30s, unmarried men and considered sensory traits as the most important factor.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of this study is the lack of generalization of consumer panels to represent the entire population because they were part of an online research firm.

Originality/value

This study implies that segmenting consumers according to FRL allows detailed analysis of consumer attitudes and behaviors. Using this analysis, the complex consumer pattern can be used as basic data for promoting sugar-reduced beverages.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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