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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2017

Kanhua Yu, Jian Gong, Yan Jing, Shuqian Liu and Shihao Liang

Many cities of various types are distributed in the large area of mountainous regions in China. In these cities, there are acute contradictions between man and earth…

Abstract

Many cities of various types are distributed in the large area of mountainous regions in China. In these cities, there are acute contradictions between man and earth. Considering that the space growth mode of mountainous cities is widely different from that of flatland cities, the fractal method was adopted in the research aimed at demarcating the urban growth boundary of mountainous cities. The fractal features of the investigated mountainous cities in space were figured out via inference from their function, dimension, region, grade, and environment, and the fractal mode and conceptual framework of urban growth boundary of Qin-Ba mountainous region were constructed according to some concepts and methods such as fractal dimension, fractal network, and fractal order. In the research, the traditional urban growth boundary form-was decomposed into scattered points (point form), paths (linear form), and patches (plane form) to form the fractal theory units for the research of urban growth boundary, and the leading idea, procedure, and control method for “fractal demarcation of urban growth boundary” were established to provide strategies for demarcation of urban space growth boundary of Qin-Ba mountainous region.

Details

Open House International, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2017

Xuhui Wang, Kewei Liu, Kai Wang, Jian Gong, Yanjun Wang and Yajiang Fan

Urban parks play a key role in recreational activities, public health, and ecosystem services in urban areas. Using GIS and Fragstats, this study investigated the…

Abstract

Urban parks play a key role in recreational activities, public health, and ecosystem services in urban areas. Using GIS and Fragstats, this study investigated the spatiotemporal dynamics of urban parks in Xi'an, China from 1949 to 2015 and the corresponding driving forces. The results show that the number and area of parks in Xi'an increased constantly during this period, especially from 2000 to 2015. Up to 2015, small green spaces, usually adjacent to streets, occupied the largest proportion among all types of parks. Archaeological parks were the largest in total area, but wetland parks were leading in average size of a single park. The density of parks was negatively correlated with their distance to the Clock Tower at the center of Xi'an. The dynamics of urban parks in highly urbanized areas were significantly different from that of their counterparts in suburban areas. Driving forces such as urban planning, urbanization and green space policies, and milestone events in the city's development jointly had a great effect on the distribution of parks in Xi'an. The research outcomes will support the upcoming Green Space Planning of Xi'an and benefit the pursuit of sustainability and human wellbeing.

Details

Open House International, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 November 2020

David W. Knight, Lina Xiong, Wei Lan and Jian Gong

The purpose of this paper is to present initial findings from a vulnerability assessment based on the perceptions of practitioners working in four tourism and hospitality…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present initial findings from a vulnerability assessment based on the perceptions of practitioners working in four tourism and hospitality sectors in Wuhan and Hubei Province, namely, cruise lines, hotels, travel agencies and touristic attractions.

Design/methodology/approach

The research note focuses on the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak from January to March 2020. Using the destination sustainability framework and an “interpretation” mixed methods research design, the authors analyze phone interviews (n = 151) and subsequent online surveys (n = 370) to assess sector-specific perceptions of exposure, sensitivity and system adaptiveness.

Findings

Overall, findings paint a grim picture of each sector in the short-term. All respondents reported an immediate economic loss due to COVID-19, as well as recovery concerns and uncertainties. Immediate actions for addressing these issues centered on internal cost control and governmental subsidies, while anticipated next steps focused on product adjustment, a transformation of business structures and seeking governmental guidance and policies in restoring market confidence. Findings also allude to future strategies/directions.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited in its focus on practitioner views in the immediate COVID-19 outbreak. Implications highlight a crucial strategic dependence of each sector on effective government/managerial communication and support, with smaller, local businesses needing particular attention in crisis situations.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this research note is the first comprehensive study presenting vital information pertaining to the impact of COVID-19 on tourism and hospitality businesses from a large group of business leaders in the site of the initial outbreak (i.e. Wuhan and Hubei Province). With the highly infectious COVID-19 representing an ongoing threat for populations worldwide, this paper hopes this research note provides valuable insights for practitioners in other vulnerable regions, as well as for researchers examining strategies for resilience against this and future disasters.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2007

Low Sui Pheng

The Chinese civilization is an important part of the history of mankind. The purpose of this paper is to show that there are project management lessons to be learned from…

Abstract

Purpose

The Chinese civilization is an important part of the history of mankind. The purpose of this paper is to show that there are project management lessons to be learned from Chinese history, including that relating to the management of the building process in ancient China.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a review of the literature, this paper discusses the key management and economic practices in the building process of ancient China and highlights these practices from an important document, the Yingzao Fashi or (“Treatise on Architectural Methods”), that was compared with the modern‐day project management framework.

Findings

This paper explains the official systems instituted for public projects; the management of labour, design and planning of construction works; quantity surveying practices; the use, control and recycling of building materials; and inspection of building elements in ancient China.

Practical implications

The study suggests that lessons in the principles of construction project management in ancient China bear many similarities with the nine areas of modern‐day project management body of knowledge relating to integration, scope, time, cost, quality, human resource, communications, risk, and procurement management. An area for future research would be to compare the Yingzao Fashi with modern‐day codes of practice for building works to determine which of its “ancient” provisions relating to quality management are still relevant today.

Originality/value

It was found that much emphasis was placed by the ancient Chinese on the quality aspects of prominent building projects. This is one facet from which modern‐day project managers and clients can draw lessons.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Min Li, Wenyuan Huang, Chunyang Zhang and Zhengxi Yang

The purpose of this paper is to draw on triadic reciprocal determinism and social exchange theory to examine how “induced-type” and “compulsory-type” union participation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw on triadic reciprocal determinism and social exchange theory to examine how “induced-type” and “compulsory-type” union participation influence union commitment and job involvement, and how union participation in the west differs from that in China. It also examines whether the role of both organizational justice and employee participation climate (EPC) functions in the Chinese context.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional data are collected from 694 employees in 46 non-publicly owned enterprises, both Chinese and foreign, in the Pearl River Delta region of China. A multi-level moderated mediation test is used to examine the model of this research.

Findings

Union participation is positively related to organizational justice, union commitment and job involvement. In addition, organizational justice acts as the mediator among union participation, union commitment and job involvement. Specifically, the mediating role of organizational justice between union participation and union commitment, and between union participation and job involvement, is stronger in high-EPC contexts than low-EPC contexts.

Originality/value

Instead of examining the impacts of attitudes on union participation, as per most studies in the western context, this research examines the impacts of union participation in the Chinese context on attitudes, including union commitment and job involvement. It also reveals the role of both organizational justice and EPC in the process through which union participation influences union commitment and job involvement.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Wei Ping He

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of China's contemporary banking regulatory system, with particular focus on regulatory control of foreign banks trading…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of China's contemporary banking regulatory system, with particular focus on regulatory control of foreign banks trading in China. The paper addresses three aspects of Chinese banking regulation: what does China regulate; why does China regulate; and how does China regulate. Much of the discussion is concerned with China's regulatory agencies particularly with the role of the CBRC as the principal regulator in China's banking sector.

Design/methodology/approach

In the first instance the paper presents an overview of banking regulatory models gained from a review of theoretical literature in the area. Then through a wide ranging review of Chinese publications, both academic and official, the paper seeks to relate the course of regulatory reform in China, both in terms of compliance with orthodox regulatory theory, and the unique regulatory requirements of the Chinese banking system.

Findings

The paper recognises that China has embraced the need for banking regulation with the establishment of an institutional structure that is responsive to both banking supervision and government policy. Within that structure the role of the CBRC, the pervasive manner in which that agency operates, and the content of its regulatory output have been identified and critically reviewed.

Originality/value

In its review of the modernization of China's banking regulatory system, the paper achieves originality from the author's research into, and critical reflections on Chinese generated literature, both institutional and academic, which is then communicated in a manner that will be understood by readers familiar with Western banking regulatory theory.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Low Sui Pheng

China is among one of the oldest civilizations in the world. The massive land mass of China also means that the Chinese people are subject to weather extremes as well as…

Abstract

China is among one of the oldest civilizations in the world. The massive land mass of China also means that the Chinese people are subject to weather extremes as well as topographical variety in a country which cuts across alpine heights, treacherous deserts, lush valleys, dusty plains and lengthy rivers. With these weather extremes as the backdrop, it is crucial for the Chinese people to develop appropriate environmental control techniques for their dwellings as well as to ensure the structural integrity of their buildings. This paper discusses the protection, heating, anti‐seismic and dampness techniques developed and implemented in ancient China. It also documents the measures taken by the ancient Chinese to ensure the structural integrity of their buildings. The examples highlighted in this paper suggest that the building science principles adopted in ancient China remain relevant in the construction industry today.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

W.Y. Grace Cheng, S.M. Lo, Z. Fang and C.X. Cheng

Buildings erected in ancient China were often of wood and thatch and were particularly flammable. The ancient world developed a number of ways to minimize the damage…

Abstract

Buildings erected in ancient China were often of wood and thatch and were particularly flammable. The ancient world developed a number of ways to minimize the damage caused by fire. An analysis of the architecture of ancient construction and urban planning, has revealed over a hundred fire prevention features. These items could be categorized into three groups, namely: symbolic features, building construction and urban planning. In the earlier literature of ancient China in which people had limited knowledge of fire, symbolic features based on their religious belief were emphasized. With the increase in construction experience, more tangible means of fire prevention were included in building design and urban planning. This paper briefly explores the changes of fire prevention means from early ancient period to Qing Dynasty. The reduction of damage caused by unwanted fire revealed the effectiveness of the evolution of fire prevention from symbolic features to urban planning.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Zhenxing Gong, Jian Zhang, Yujia Zhao and Lei Yin

Burnout among first-line police in China is high. The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between feedback environment, feedback orientation…

Abstract

Purpose

Burnout among first-line police in China is high. The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between feedback environment, feedback orientation, psychological empowerment, and burnout as related to the police work.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study was conducted with a sample of 437 basic-level policemen and policewomen in the Shandong province of China. Participants completed a series of questionnaires including the supervisor feedback environment scale, feedback orientation scale, psychological empowerment scale, and the Maslach Burnout Inventory.

Findings

The results indicate that police supervisor feedback environment is negatively related to burnout. The relationship between the supervisor feedback environment and burnout is perfectly mediated by psychological empowerment and significantly moderated by feedback orientation. The mediation effect of psychological empowerment is significantly influenced by feedback orientation.

Originality/value

The findings have contributed to answering several recent questions in the feedback-burnout literature. The authors stress that leaders should strive to build a supportive feedback environment for employees.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Jian Zhang, Ying Zhang, Yahui Song and Zhenxing Gong

Following self-determination theory, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of four motivational profiles (external, introjected, identified regulation…

Abstract

Purpose

Following self-determination theory, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of four motivational profiles (external, introjected, identified regulation, and intrinsic motivation) on work performance (interpersonal, adaptive, task, and dedicative performance). The authors also examined the proposed relations with longitudinal data.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants in Studies 1 and 2 were from several companies in China. Employees completed the questionnaires to measure their work motivation, and managers completed the questionnaires to assess the subordinates’ work performance.

Findings

In Study 1, the authors found that identified regulation significantly predicted interpersonal performance and adaptive performance. External regulation, introjected regulation, and intrinsic motivation had no significant impacts on interpersonal, adaptive, task, or dedicative performance. In Study 2, the results revealed that identified regulation significantly predicted dedicative and interpersonal performance, but external regulation, introjected regulation, and intrinsic motivation had no significant impacts on the four types of performance. These two studies concluded that only identified regulation strongly predicts work performance.

Originality/value

The study has contributed to the body of knowledge by clarifying that identified regulation is an important type of motivation in the workplace. Managers might therefore focus on supporting employees for identifying with the organizational goals in order to promote better performance.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 54 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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