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Book part
Publication date: 2 August 2021

Clara Bassano and Paolo Piciocchi

The aim of the chapter is to highlight the limits and opportunities linked to the use of tools such as interactive marketing and communication in small creative businesses…

Abstract

The aim of the chapter is to highlight the limits and opportunities linked to the use of tools such as interactive marketing and communication in small creative businesses comprising Italian jewellery districts to achieve greater competitiveness of local systems on global markets.

From secondary data and the analysis of district websites, the specificity of Italian jewellery districts is analysed in terms of relational and learning differences. Starting from a circumscribed (isolated), experience of hands-on learning, it is suggested that systemic progress can be made within a collective local system of learning (i.e. a virtuous and widespread knowledge of the district system) by virtue of internet-based technologies (IBT). In this respect, the chapter evidences how the productive and creative specificity of Italian jewellery district systems can gain impetus, in terms of greater competitiveness, from the use of IBT.

Article
Publication date: 8 September 2021

Amélia Brandão, Sílvia Ramos and Mahesh Gadekar

Creative entrepreneurship has contributed to economic development of regions and countries and have become models for the countries in the Western world. Jewelry designer…

Abstract

Purpose

Creative entrepreneurship has contributed to economic development of regions and countries and have become models for the countries in the Western world. Jewelry designer entrepreneurs are one of the contributors toward creative economy for their role in economic prosperity. This article aims to investigate brand-building efforts of jewelry designer entrepreneurs. This study also aims to explore how jewelry designer entrepreneurs develop and communicate brand narrative, and how brand backstories confer value to jewelry.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a qualitative approach. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with seven Portuguese designer jewelry.

Findings

The study identified seven themes to reflect the brand narratives of the Portuguese jewelry designer entrepreneurs: designer artists considered the importance of international recognition; designer jewelry uses the ontological metaphor to connect emotionally; designer jewelry making a jewelry piece that is fluid and organic; limited association with fashion; distinctive brand communication; fair pricing strategy; and identifying self as artistic worker. The study also shows that jewelry designer entrepreneurs adopt a distinctive brand communication tactics to connect emotionally with imagine customers.

Practical implications

This study proposes a general and managerial guide to boost personal brand jewelry designer entrepreneurs through brand narratives.

Originality/value

This study bridges an academia gap on personal branding, exploring how jewelry designer entrepreneurs develop and communicate brand narrative and brand backstories adding value to the jewelry industry.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 November 2020

Stephanie A. Pankiw, Barbara J. Phillips and David E. Williams

Luxury brands seek to differentiate themselves from competitors by engaging in corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices. Although many luxury brands participate in…

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Abstract

Purpose

Luxury brands seek to differentiate themselves from competitors by engaging in corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices. Although many luxury brands participate in CSR activities, it is unclear if luxury brands communicate these CSR activities to consumers. Therefore, this study aims to explore two questions: are luxury jewelry brands communicating CSR (including women’s empowerment) in their advertising? And how should luxury jewelry brands communicate CSR messages in their advertising?

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a content analysis of luxury jewelry print advertisements and in-depth interviews with 20 female jewelry consumers analyzed using grounded theory to construct the luxury brand CSR advertising strategies theory.

Findings

Very few (3%) of print advertisements contain CSR messages, including femvertising and the theory presents four paths for brands to consider when promoting CSR practices, namely, ethical sourcing, cause-related marketing product, a signal of product care and quality and signal of an authentic relationship with the consumer.

Practical implications

The model provides four potential CSR advertising strategies and guidelines luxury jewelry brands can use to create successful advertising campaigns.

Originality/value

Luxury jewelry advertising has not been empirically examined and the study fills gaps in the understanding of luxury brands’ communication strategies. It adds to the knowledge and theorizing of the use and appropriateness of CSR appeals in a luxury brand context.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 January 2020

Fabian Maximilian Johannes Teichmann

This paper aims to illustrate how white-collar criminals launder money in the jewellery business.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to illustrate how white-collar criminals launder money in the jewellery business.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 50 white-collar criminals and 50 compliance and prevention experts in Austria, Germany, Liechtenstein and Switzerland. Following the qualitative content analysis of their responses, a quantitative survey of 200 compliance officers was then conducted in the same geographical area. These two methods reveal the concrete techniques used by money launderers and the compliance industry’s (lack of) awareness.

Findings

The jewellery business is susceptible to laundering money. It facilitates both the placement and layering of incriminated assets.

Research limitations/implications

As the findings of the qualitative study are based on semi-standardised interviews, they are limited to the 100 interviewees’ perspectives.

Practical implications

The identification of concrete methods of money laundering provides valuable insight into criminal activity for compliance officers, law enforcement agencies and legislators. A more profound understanding of the methods used by criminals should foster more effective crime prevention.

Originality/value

While prior literature predominantly focusses on the organisations and mechanisms aimed at fighting money laundering, this paper considers how criminals avoid detection by exploring both prevention experts’ and criminals’ perspectives.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 4 July 2020

Mana Khalifa Almheiri, Syed Zamberi Ahmad and Abdul Rahim Abu Bakar

Expected learning objectives students will be able to examine the possible reasons for a company’s poor performance using relevant business tools. Students will be able to…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

Expected learning objectives students will be able to examine the possible reasons for a company’s poor performance using relevant business tools. Students will be able to critically assess the role of technology and social media in the gem and jewellery industry in Dubai. Students will be able to analyse the customer segmentation approach used by five diamonds and to critically analyse its advantages and disadvantages. Students will be able to use the SWOT framework to identify the key weaknesses of and threats to five diamonds and identify the strengths and opportunities that the company needed to capitalize on, to be more competitive in the industry and generate high profitability. Students will be able to critically analyse the fit between the firm’s current business strategy and its business environment and develop a “turnaround” strategy.

Case overview/synopsis

Five diamonds were a trading company that dealt in gems and jewellery, natural pearls and branded watches. The company had been founded by Mustafa Al Fardan in 2003 and was currently run by his son Mohammed Al Fardan who held the position of General Manager. The company was based in Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE) with two local branches and eight international branches in China, France, India, Switzerland, Hong Kong and the UK. The branches were located in Palm Strip Jumeirah and in the Jumeirah Al Naseem Hotel, in the Umm Sequim area. The Palm Strip Jumeirah region is one of the largest and crowded areas in Dubai with world-class facilities such as hotels, clinics, restaurants, beaches and clubs, making it a perfect location for tourists. The Umm Sequim region is in the same area where the iconic seven-star hotel, Burj Al Arab, is located. The place is also a “must be” place for tourists and has recorded a significant increase in traffic at different times of the year. Despite their strong presence locally and internationally, the firm was facing fierce competition from the hostile business environment. Industry trends and the business environment were changing the local and global gems and jewellery industry landscape. These changes had offset five diamonds’ business strategy and its long-held business tradition. As a result, the company yearly profit had started to plummet. The company needed to revise its existing business strategy and the way it operated in the market. Failure to do so would have resulted in the firm missing the huge growth opportunity and also put itself into jeopardy.

Complexity academic level

This case is useful for undergraduate and postgraduate students majoring in marketing, business management and/or strategic management.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Beulah Pereira, Kevin Teah, Billy Sung and Min Teah

The purpose of this paper is to conduct an in-depth interview with the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Larry Jewelry, a luxury jeweller with boutiques in Hong Kong and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conduct an in-depth interview with the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Larry Jewelry, a luxury jeweller with boutiques in Hong Kong and Singapore. Given the ever-evolving luxury jewellery market in South East Asia, it is paramount to understand the success factors of the luxury jewellery sector.

Design/methodology/approach

An in-depth interview approach is used to understand the antecedents of the success of the luxury jewellery sector. Specifically, this paper presents a complex business model of Larry Jewelry and an in-depth interview with the CEO of Larry Jewelry for current insights in the sector.

Findings

This paper highlights the history of Larry Jewelry, its product segments and the key elements of its business blueprint. Specifically, the success of Larry Jewelry is attributed to its business model and strong branding on quality, craftsmanship, rarity, human interaction and trust.

Originality/value

Despite the substantial growth in the luxury jewellery sector, there is relatively little research on the success factors of this industry, especially in South East Asia. The current research provides practical insights into business blueprint of a successful luxury jeweller in Hong Kong and Singapore.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Abstract

Subject area

Strategic management.

Study level/applicability

Upper-level undergraduate courses or introductory MBA courses.

Case overview

The need to diversify the financial risks of his scrap metal business based in Georgia led Levan to invest in a diamond trading company in the UAE. He agreed to be a sleeping partner and provide the capital to Kewon, a diamond specialist with a wealth of experience in the field, in their joint attempt to build an international network of diamond trade. Despite several difficulties faced on the way, their company seemed to generate stable returns for more than five years. Yet following the surprising discovery of multiple organizational inconsistencies, Levan decided to end the partnership with Kewon and establish his own retail jewelry store to be managed by the members of his family. Ultimately, he was confronted with two important decisions regarding both his jewelry business and the diamond company in which he had previously invested a significant amount of capital. The decisions he was about to make were of critical importance for the future of these companies and the people who managed them. By walking readers through a series of triggering events, this case offers the opportunity to evaluate the effectiveness of managerial actions through the application of various strategic management tools and frameworks.

Expected learning outcomes

Upon completion of this case study analysis, students should be able to: estimate the complexities associated with the management of a partnership-based venture in the context of emerging markets; perform a detailed diagnosis of an entrepreneurial venture, applying relevant strategic management tools and techniques; evaluate the effectiveness of managerial actions and decisions at different stages of the organizational lifecycle; and demonstrate the importance of the strategic adaptation of organizations through the deployment of viable decision-making skills.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Ganesan Kannabiran and Saumen Bhaumik

This paper aims to examine how creative industries can adopt supply chain management (SCM) approaches to achieve business excellence.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how creative industries can adopt supply chain management (SCM) approaches to achieve business excellence.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on case research of supply chain (SC) integration in a jewellery‐manufacturing organisation.

Findings

Organisations in the creative industries such as jewellery can achieve superior performance through systematic supply chain planning and implementation. Integrating SC planning with business planning, persistent commitment of the top management and making use of cross‐functional teams for implementation are some of the key determinants of SCM.

Research limitations/implications

The paper presents a basis for understanding the scope for adopting SCM approaches in creative industries. Future research may be directed to identify and evaluate the parameters of successful adoption of SCM approaches in other creative industries. The research has the generic limitation of generalisability. However, it provides an insight into understanding the issues of SCM adoption in a developing country context.

Practical implications

Practitioners are required to use cross‐functional teams for SCM implementation, choose unique approaches to manage supply chain performance and exploit native talents in creative industries.

Originality/value

The paper brings out the key aspects of supply chain integration in creative industries with specific reference to a developing country.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 11 June 2019

Heba Mohamed Adel and Raghda Abulsaoud Ahmed Younis

This paper aims to study the impact of innovation climate (IC) on co-creating modular mass-customisation (CMMC) in terms of cost effectiveness, volume effectiveness…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the impact of innovation climate (IC) on co-creating modular mass-customisation (CMMC) in terms of cost effectiveness, volume effectiveness, responsiveness, product modularity and collaborative assembly. Additionally, this research paper investigates the effect of IC and CMMC on the value to customer (VC) in a modular jewellery emerging market that includes international companies.

Design/methodology/approach

After conducting a comprehensive literature review, the authors suggested a conceptual framework and examined it using mixed methods approach. In addition to qualitative focus groups, questionnaires were filled – across five-point Likert scale format – through 63 depth interviews carried out with subject-matter-experts working at 14 international organisations in the Egyptian modular jewellery market. SmartPLS software was used for structural equation modelling analysis.

Findings

Results showed that CMMC positively and significantly affects VC. Furthermore, IC positively and significantly affects both CMMC and VC.

Practical implications

Recent industrial developments that can be observed in such international modular jewellery sector can be enhanced by the empirical evidence of this research regarding the importance of developing IC for more creative manufacturing approach of modular mass-customisation and better VC.

Originality/value

To the best of our knowledge, it is the first empirical study that investigates the relationship between CMMC, IC and VC in a unique jewellery market, which recently generated high customer involvement in the assembly/reassembly processes. Conceptually and empirically, it consolidates and adds to the literature of production and operations management (mass-customisation), organisational studies and innovation science (organisational climate for innovation) and applied social sciences.

Details

Journal of Humanities and Applied Social Sciences, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2632-279X

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 7 October 2021

K. S. Manikandan

Corporate Strategy; Strategy.

Abstract

Subject area

Corporate Strategy; Strategy.

Study level/applicability

Post-graduate; Executive education; Under-graduate.

Case overview

The case is based on Titan Company Limited (Titan), one of India’s profitable diversified companies. Set in April 2020, the case presents the evolution of Titan’s growth strategy in the last three decades. The company had grown by continuously exploring adjacent categories in the personal lifestyle space. The case asks whether the strategy that has guided Titan for the past three decades would continue to provide growth. What changes, if any, should be made by C.K. Venkataraman—the new CEO who had taken charge a few months back in October 2019—and his team?

The case describes Titan’s evolution from 1987 to 2020. ‘Winning times’, the first section of the case, describes Titan’s early choices in the watches business that helped the company achieve market dominance and its successive choices to expand the scope of watches businesses by entering new adjacencies. The section also details the evolution of Titan’s design, manufacturing, marketing and retailing capabilities in early years. ‘Looking for another gem’ describes Titan’s venture into the jewellery business – the failure of its early attempts to export and its pivot to domestic market and the successful turnaround of the business. ‘On the fast track to growth’ deals with Titan’s accessories business. The section ‘Eyeing new businesses’ describes Titan’s foray into prescription eyewear and precision engineering businesses and the company’s performance in these businesses. ‘A new identity’ details Titan’s adoption of a distinct corporate identity in 2013. ‘New businesses’ provides information on Titan’s recent foray into fragrances and sarees business. The case ends with the section ‘Years ahead’ which asks what changes, if any, should be made by the leadership team.

Expected learning outcomes:

Upon completion of the case study discussion, participants will be able to: understand the concept of the ‘core competence’ and the three tests of core competence; how core competencies evolve in an organization over time; diversification (growth) strategy based on core competencies and adjacencies; and key managerial choices and organizational processes required to ensure effectiveness of diversification strategy based on core competencies.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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