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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Stephanie Kirchhoff, Heather Smyth, Jessica Sanderson, Yasmina Sultanbawa and Katrina Gething

The purpose of this study is to illustrate how means‐end chain theory can inform communications that effectively convey the health messages of vegetable consumption to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to illustrate how means‐end chain theory can inform communications that effectively convey the health messages of vegetable consumption to various publics.

Design/methodology/approach

Laddering interviews were conducted with 61 participants who consumed at least two serves of vegetables a day and were responsible in part or whole for shopping in their household. A means‐end chain value map was then constructed using mecanalyst software.

Findings

Using means‐end theory, an example communications strategy was developed from the dominant chain. The health and wellness features that respondents associated with vegetables were “freshness”, a “source of vitamins and minerals”, and “high nutritional value”. In the mind of the consumer, these features were linked to the benefit concept “maintain energy and vitality”, which in turn was connected to the consequence “maintain an active life”. The end‐states or goals participants ultimately connected to the health and wellness features of vegetables were that of “enjoy life” and “achieve goals”.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited in so far as subjects who consume less than two serves of vegetables are not recruited for this study.

Practical implications

It is suggested that social marketing initiatives designed to increase vegetable consumption may base messages on health‐related values or end‐states of being to resonate more effectively with consumers.

Social implications

High vegetable consumption is associated with a reduced risk of chronic disease. Effective strategies designed to increase vegetable consumption amongst populations may reduce the burden on health systems.

Originality/value

This study illustrates how consumers' cognitive processes can inform social marketing communications.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 113 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Ruth Elizabeth Sanderson and Stephen Whitehead

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the barriers women identify to their promotion in international schools and also the ways in which women can overcome these barriers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the barriers women identify to their promotion in international schools and also the ways in which women can overcome these barriers.

Design/methodology/approach

The field of enquiry is international schools, with the study drawing on qualitative research. The researchers interviewed 11 women from a leading international school in Seoul, South Korea.

Findings

The women interviewed provided rich qualitative data and identified a number of barriers relating to culture, including gender stereotyping and self-confidence issues, and organisational behaviour, including the lack of a work-life balance and the patriarchal and hierarchical structures in place. The suggested ways in which women could overcome the barriers included building self-confidence and seeking mentoring.

Practical implications

The women also developed a list of factors that any woman would need to contemplate if she is thinking about applying to be a senior manager, including qualifications, communication skills and acknowledging, tolerating and overcoming gender unfairness, in that men do not need to think about the same issues when seeking leadership positions.

Originality/value

This paper examines an area of gendered leadership that has received little critical academic scrutiny, international schools and is particularly valuable to women working in these schools. However, its scope extends to all international school leaders who seek to improve the effectiveness of their organisations by employing and promoting the best leaders available.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 58 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Career Development International, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Nick Axford and Vashti Berry

This article seeks to help senior local policy‐makers, managers and practitioners in children's services to develop robust but realistic and manageable strategies for…

Abstract

This article seeks to help senior local policy‐makers, managers and practitioners in children's services to develop robust but realistic and manageable strategies for measuring outcomes in a multi‐disciplinary context. Drawing on orthodox research methods, it sets out strategies for measuring outcomes in children's services at individual child, service and community levels. It is intended to show how, in a given local jurisdiction, different approaches to measuring outcomes could fit together logically and within a reasonable budget, so creating an outcome culture and contributing to the development and integration of services. The principles outlined would also apply to adult services.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2010

Sandra Bailey, James Ridley and Beth Greenhill

When the behaviour of people with intellectual disabilities challenges carers and services, complex and competing human rights issues may emerge. This article explores the…

Abstract

When the behaviour of people with intellectual disabilities challenges carers and services, complex and competing human rights issues may emerge. This article explores the human rights issues raised by both people's challenging behaviour and the attempts of others to respond to those behaviours. It is suggested that a human rights‐based approach to challenging behaviour offers a vehicle for balancing the ethical issues involved. Key concepts and practical tools from within our service to support clinicians in working more ethically with people's challenges are introduced. The potential advantages of taking a human rights‐based approach relative to other ethical approaches are also explored.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Book part
Publication date: 20 May 2019

Marit F. Svindseth and Paul Crawford

Abstract

Details

Humiliation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-098-6

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Book part
Publication date: 3 July 2018

Bruce Gurd, Cheryll Lim and Ellen Schuler

This chapter reports on a hybrid sector of disability provision in Australia and the changes to the sector due to the shift to person-centred care in Australia. It…

Abstract

This chapter reports on a hybrid sector of disability provision in Australia and the changes to the sector due to the shift to person-centred care in Australia. It explains the significant changes to the way the sector will respond to government and to client demands and how the organisations are responding to this by re-structuring and building new performance measurement systems including Social Return on Investment.

The first part of the chapter is descriptive of the change to person-centred care in the Australian disability sector using public reports. The second part of the chapter looks at the change at a micro level using an analysis of the literature.

Findings illustrate how the National Disability Insurance Scheme has brought about significant change between sectors of government and between providers, both government and non-government. Organisations have had to make significant changes to adapt to the government’s policy and especially funding change. This includes setting new governance and leadership models, changed human resource management practices and performance measurement systems.

The paper is a report relatively early in the transition phases, and therefore, more evidence is needed as the system change progresses. Still, the Australian disability sector provides a powerful example of significant hybridisation changes as a result of a shift to person-centred care.

This is a dramatic change from the Australian government to impose person-centred care. The adaptations of Australian organisations provide an interesting insight for the international community.

Details

Hybridity in the Governance and Delivery of Public Services
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-769-2

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Anna Marie Johnson, Claudene Sproles, Robert Detmering and Jessica English

The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper introduces and annotates periodical articles, monographs, and audiovisual material examining library instruction and information literacy.

Findings

Information is provided about each source, and the paper discusses the characteristics of current scholarship, and describes sources that contain unique scholarly contributions and quality reproductions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2017

Kevin J. Boudreau

Rather than organize as traditional firms, many of today’s companies organize as platforms that sit at the nexus of multiple exchange and production relationships. This…

Abstract

Rather than organize as traditional firms, many of today’s companies organize as platforms that sit at the nexus of multiple exchange and production relationships. This chapter considers a most basic question of organization in platform contexts: the choice of boundaries. Herein, I investigate how classical economic theories of firm boundaries apply to platform-based organization and empirically study how executives made boundary choices in response to changing market and technical challenges in the early mobile computing industry (the predecessor to today’s smartphones). Rather than a strict or unavoidable tradeoff between “openness-versus-control,” most successful platform owners chose their boundaries in a way to simultaneously open-up to outside developers while maintaining coordination across the entire system.

Details

Entrepreneurship, Innovation, and Platforms
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-080-8

Keywords

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