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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

William Walker Wroe, Jessica Gladstone, Tim Phillips, Scott Fish, Joseph Beaman and Austin McElroy

This paper aims to establish a method to verify in real time the quality of a part being built using Selective Laser Sintering (SLS).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to establish a method to verify in real time the quality of a part being built using Selective Laser Sintering (SLS).

Design/methodology/approach

A SLS build of 30 Nylon 12 tensile bars was done while using an infrared camera to record the thermal history of each bar. The thermal history was then compared to the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of each bar. In addition, an attempt was made to identify where the fracture of each bar occurred based on its thermal history.

Findings

Several analysis techniques were used to compare the thermal history of each bar to its UTS. The strongest correlation found was 0.746. In addition, multiple strategies for predicting the break location where used, with the most successful making a correct prediction on 46 per cent of the bars.

Originality/value

This paper studies the feasibility of in-situ build verification, a technique that if successful would greatly help the further adoption of SLS as a method of manufacturing.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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Book part
Publication date: 25 March 2019

Allan Wigfield and Jessica R. Gladstone

We discuss the development of achievement motivation from the perspective of Eccles and colleagues’ expectancy-value theory (EVT), focusing on the importance of children…

Abstract

We discuss the development of achievement motivation from the perspective of Eccles and colleagues’ expectancy-value theory (EVT), focusing on the importance of children developing positive expectancies for success and valuing of achievement to help them cope with change and uncertainty. Although research has shown that, overall, children’s expectancies and values decline, recent studies show many different trajectories in the overall pattern. Children’s expectancies and values predict their school performance and choices of which activities to pursue in and out of school, with these relations getting stronger as children get older. When children’s expectancies and values stay more positive, they can better cope with change and uncertainty, such as the increasing difficulty of many school subjects, or broader changes such as immigrating to a new country. Parents can buffer children’s experiences of change and uncertainty by encouraging them to engage in different activities and by providing them opportunities to do so. Parents’ positive beliefs about their children’s abilities and discussing with them the importance of school can moderate the observed decline in children’s ability beliefs and values. For immigrant and minority children, parents’ emphasis on the importance of school and encouragement of the development of a positive sense of their racial/ethnic identity are critical buffers. Positive teacher–child relations also are a strong buffer, although research indicates that immigrant and minority children often have less positive relations with their teachers. We close with a discussion on recent EVT-based intervention research that shows how children’s beliefs and values for different school subjects can be fostered.

Details

Motivation in Education at a Time of Global Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-613-4

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Book part
Publication date: 25 March 2019

Abstract

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Motivation in Education at a Time of Global Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-613-4

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Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2017

Eva Tutchell and John Edmonds

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The Stalled Revolution: Is Equality for Women an Impossible Dream?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-602-0

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Library Hi Tech News, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Victoria Marshall and Chris Goddard

In this chapter, the authors focus on a range of Australian news articles selected for their relevance to key themes in the area of child abuse and examine two high…

Abstract

In this chapter, the authors focus on a range of Australian news articles selected for their relevance to key themes in the area of child abuse and examine two high profile cases of child abuse deaths that were extensively reported on by the media and led to system reform. Challenges for media reporting on child abuse in Australia including a changing media landscape, lack of available child abuse data and lack of publicly available serious case reviews are discussed. The authors argue that there is a need for attention to be paid to children's resistance and agency in the context of violence and abuse to counter the objectification of children and uphold their rights. Following Finkelhor (2008), the authors argue that media reporting on child abuse in Australia reflects a general approach to child abuse that is fragmented, with different types of abuse viewed as separate from one another, and call for a more integrated understanding of child abuse. The authors highlight the complexity of media responses to child abuse in Australia, noting that while the social problem of child abuse can be misrepresented by the media, media reporting has also triggered significant systemic reform and advocated for children in cases where other systems failed them.

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Gendered Domestic Violence and Abuse in Popular Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-781-7

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Book part
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Abstract

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Gender and Contemporary Horror in Television
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-103-2

Abstract

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Singing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-332-1

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2015

Tessa Hughes and Maria Castro Romero

The purpose of this paper is to develop an approach within the guidance of the Mental Capacity Act (2005) to meaningfully include people diagnosed with dementia (PDwD) in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an approach within the guidance of the Mental Capacity Act (2005) to meaningfully include people diagnosed with dementia (PDwD) in research endeavours.

Design/methodology/approach

As part of a broader study of self-authored narratives of care experiences, PDwD were involved in the development and implementation of a process method of consent, in which consent conversations were contextual, responsive and ongoing, and were audited with the use of field diaries.

Findings

Working within people’s relational contexts (i.e. care staff and family), eight participants with a range of dementia diagnoses and care needs made and verbally communicated research-related decisions. A desire to participate was consistently conveyed across research encounters, regardless of the extent of memory problems. Participants also demonstrated keen awareness of the links between memory problems, rights and inclusion, alongside a sense of personal identity and the capacities to clearly communicate this.

Research limitations/implications

A process model of consent encouraged formal reflection upon ethical and pragmatic complexities, and is relevant to persons diagnosed with dementia making both care- and research-related decisions. Further work is needed to include people with a broader range of communication support needs.

Originality/value

This research demonstrates substantial possibilities for eliciting and responding to the views of people with dementia diagnoses (previously excluded from research). Results open opportunities for genuine long-term research and care partnerships with PDwD for practice, service and policy development.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2020

Ghorban Hemati Alamdarloo and Hasan Mradi

Autism spectrum disorder is a kind of neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by persistent deficits in social communication and interaction across multiple contexts…

Abstract

Purpose

Autism spectrum disorder is a kind of neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by persistent deficits in social communication and interaction across multiple contexts, and restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests or activities. The purpose of this paper is to determine the effectiveness of sensory integration intervention on emotional-behavioral problems in children with autism spectrum disorder.

Design/methodology/approach

This research was conducted in a pretest-posttest design with control group. The participants were 30 children with autism spectrum disorder (6–11 years old) who were selected through convenience sampling from among children with autism spectrum disorder in Zeinab center of Isfahan and were randomly divided into two groups of 15 subjects. The children of the experimental group received 14 sessions of sensory integration intervention while the control group did not receive this intervention. To measure emotional-behavioral problems, the Behavior Assessment System for Children-Second Edition was used. To analyze the data, ANCOVA and MANCOVA tests were used.

Findings

The results showed that sensory integration intervention improves emotional-behavioral problems and its subscales (hyperactivity, aggression, behavioral problems, anxiety, depression, somatization, attention problems, learning difficulties, atypicality and withdrawal) in children with autism spectrum disorder.

Research limitations/implications

Therefore, it can be concluded that sensory integration intervention can be a suitable treatment for reducing sensory problems and improving emotional-behavioral problems in children with autism spectrum disorder.

Originality/value

The study of the effect of sensory integration on emotional-behavioral problems in children with autism spectrum disorder is necessary as a simple and non-side-effect educational and therapeutic method, both as a step to fill the research gap in this field, besides being a cheap and affordable way for improving the various skills of children with autism spectrum disorder for professionals, teachers, parents and educators.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

Keywords

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