Search results

1 – 10 of 111
To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2007

Jessica Gardner

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Jessica Gardner

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 19 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Jessica Gardner

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2015

Gaelynn P. Wolf Bordonaro, Laura Cherry and Jessica Stallings

The relationship between learning and mental health, as well as a growing body of literature, underscores the need for art therapy in educational settings. This is…

Abstract

The relationship between learning and mental health, as well as a growing body of literature, underscores the need for art therapy in educational settings. This is particularly true for learners with special needs. Shostak et al. (1985) affirmed that “for children with special needs, art therapy in a school setting can offer opportunities to work through obstacles that impede educational success” (p. 19). School art therapy facilitates improved social interaction, increased learning behaviors, appropriate affective development, and increased empathy and personal well-being. It can be adapted to meet the specific developmental needs of individual students and to parallel students’ developmental, learning, and behavioral objectives. This chapter introduces the reader to the history and basic constructs of art therapy as a psychoeducational therapeutic intervention in schools. Model programs are identified, as well as the role of the art therapist within the context of K-12 education settings. Additionally, examples of special populations who benefit from art therapy intervention within school systems are provided, along with considerations for school-wide art therapy.

Details

Interdisciplinary Connections to Special Education: Key Related Professionals Involved
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-663-8

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2016

Brian Hilligoss, Paula H. Song and Ann Scheck McAlearney

New organization theory posits that coordination mechanisms work by generating three integrating conditions: accountability (clarity about task responsibilities)…

Abstract

New organization theory posits that coordination mechanisms work by generating three integrating conditions: accountability (clarity about task responsibilities), predictability (clarity about which, when, and how tasks will be accomplished), and common understanding (shared perspectives about tasks). We apply this new theory to health care to improve understanding of how accountable care organizations (ACOs) are attempting to reduce the fragmentation that characterizes the US health care system. Drawing on four organizational case studies, we find that ACOs rely on a wide variety of coordination mechanisms that have been designed to leverage existing organizational capabilities, accommodate local contingencies. and, in some instances, interact strategically. We conclude that producing integrating conditions across the care continuum requires suites of interacting coordination mechanisms. Our findings provide a conceptual foundation for future research and improvements.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Jessica L. Hurst, Linda K. Good and Phil Gardner

The purpose of this study is to investigate interns’ supervisory support expectations, psychological contract obligations, job satisfaction, perception of advancement…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate interns’ supervisory support expectations, psychological contract obligations, job satisfaction, perception of advancement opportunities and affective organisational commitment in an attempt to gain a better understanding of how these variables influence interns’ conversion intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

This study focuses on college juniors and seniors who were enrolled in retail/service programs at one of three major US universities, and successfully completed a retail/service internship. An online survey was used to assess the influence of interns’ psychological contract expectations regarding employer obligations, supervisory support expectations, job satisfaction, perception of advancement opportunities, and affective organisational commitment on interns’ conversion intentions (intent to accept an offer for full‐time employment).

Findings

Findings indicate that employers can establish a foundation for intern retention by fulfilling obligations, both implicitly and explicitly. Furthermore, to ensure continued success of their interns, retailers should rely on supervisors and/or mentors to provide guidance, support and feedback.

Research limitations/implications

Research is limited to students who completed a retail/service internship during 2008.

Practical implications

Results provide practical implications to aid in internship program development, assist in interns’ educational and professional development, and enhance the likelihood of successful conversion of interns to employees for retail/service businesses.

Originality/value

This paper is based on actual feedback from interns. Findings will assist retailers in identifying how they can differentiate their internship programs from their competitors’, and how they can increase internship conversion rates. Additionally, the paper identifies salient factors that motivate interns to accept an offer for full‐time employment from their internship company.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Hope‐Arlene Fennell

Power relations affect all aspects of our lives. MacGregor Burns states that “Power is ubiquitous; it permeates human relationships … Power shows many faces and takes many…

Abstract

Power relations affect all aspects of our lives. MacGregor Burns states that “Power is ubiquitous; it permeates human relationships … Power shows many faces and takes many forms”. The purpose of this paper was to explore women principals’ experiences with power relations in the schools during times of increase in decentralization and accountability. The findings of this phenomenological study were that the six principals viewed power as an enabling, and a positive energy for change and growth in schools rather than a source of “top‐down” domination. Their descriptions of power also asserted that “power is not reducible to any one source”, and that an understanding of poststructuralist and structuralist theories of power will be essential for school leaders facing the dilemmas and challenges of the twenty‐first century.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 22 December 2017

Carrie James and Ashley Lee

Digital and social media have arguably altered the civic landscape, creating not only opportunities for civic voice and engagement but also distinct challenges. How do…

Abstract

Digital and social media have arguably altered the civic landscape, creating not only opportunities for civic voice and engagement but also distinct challenges. How do youth who are civically active think about activism and their own civic activities in this landscape? How does their sense of themselves as civic actors – the strength and salience of their civic identities – shape decisions to “speak up” online? In this chapter, we draw on data from interviews with civically active youth to explore connections between their civic identities and uptake of opportunities for voice online. Drawing on data from a follow-up study conducted two years after initial interviews, we also examine reported changes in online expression over time. We find that many – though not all – youth in our study appear to have strong civic identities, as indicated by their self-identification as “activists” and the centrality of voice to their conceptions of activism. We also observe connections between activist identification and online civic expression over time. Youths’ narratives about what informs their online voice decisions further suggest the relevance of forces that have influenced persistence in civic participation (such as life transitions, work, and family demands) in addition to pressures unique to the digital context (including online conflict and surveillance). This qualitative study suggests that strong civic identities may support uptake of, and persistence with, online civic expression and tolerance of related challenges. In the discussion, we consider implications for youth civic development and for the vitality and diversity of the digital civic sphere.

Details

Social Movements and Media
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-098-3

Keywords

1 – 10 of 111