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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2019

Jessica Babin and John Hulland

Some consumers are engaged in online curation, a type of user-generated content, in ways that can be impactful for brands. An example of online curation includes…

Abstract

Purpose

Some consumers are engaged in online curation, a type of user-generated content, in ways that can be impactful for brands. An example of online curation includes organizing themed collections of product images on Pinterest. The purpose of this paper is to present a framework of online consumer curation, introducing this topic to the marketing literature.

Design/methodology/approach

Through the analysis of the business and academic literature, as well as a careful study of many examples of online consumer curation, the authors present a framework for understanding online consumer curation.

Findings

The actions taken by online consumer curators are similar to those of museum or art gallery curators: acquiring, selecting, organizing and displaying content for an audience. The motivations for consumers to engage in online curation include building/displaying their identities and making social connections with their online audience. One outcome possible for the audience that views the curation is gaining access to carefully selected and recommended content.

Research limitations/implications

As online consumer curation is a new area of research, the authors suggest several marketing- and brand-relevant propositions that can be addressed in future research.

Practical implications

As consumers are frequently using product images and brand symbols in their online curation, it is important for marketing academics and practitioners to understand their actions.

Originality/value

The aim of the paper is to present a thorough introduction to the idea of online consumer curation by outlining relevant examples, providing a framework for understanding this activity and its implications for brand management, and listing ideas for future research.

Propósito

Algunos consumidores se dedican a la “curación” en línea, un tipo de contenido generado por el usuario (UGC), de manera que pueden ser impactantes para las marcas. Un ejemplo de “curación” en línea incluye la organización de colecciones temáticas de imágenes de productos en Pinterest. El propósito de esta investigación es presentar un marco sobre la “curación” del consumidor en línea, introduciendo este tema en la literatura de marketing.

Diseño/metodología/enfoque

A través de nuestro análisis de la literatura académica y empresarial, así como del estudio cuidadoso de muchos ejemplos de “curación” de los consumidores en línea, presentamos un marco para comprender la “curación” de los consumidores en línea.

Hallazgos

Las acciones realizadas por los “curadores” son similares a las de sus homólogos en museos o galerías de arte: adquirir, seleccionar, organizar y mostrar contenido para una audiencia. Las motivaciones para que los consumidores participen en la “curación” en línea incluyen construir/mostrar sus identidades y establecer conexiones sociales con su audiencia en línea. Un resultado posible para la audiencia que ve la “curación” es obtener acceso a contenido cuidadosamente seleccionado y recomendado.

Implicaciones teóricas

Como la “curación” en línea es una nueva área de investigación, sugerimos varias propuestas relevantes de marketing y marca que pueden abordarse en futuras investigaciones.

Implicaciones prácticas

Como los consumidores utilizan con frecuencia imágenes de productos y símbolos de marca en su “curación” en línea, es importante que los académicos y profesionales de marketing comprendan sus acciones.

Originalidad/valor

La investigación presenta una introducción exhaustiva a la idea de la “curación” del consumidor en línea describiendo ejemplos relevantes, proporcionando un marco para comprender esta actividad y sus implicaciones para la gestión de la marca, y enumerando ideas para futuras investigaciones.

Palabras clave

“Curación” del consumidor en línea, Comportamiento del consumidor en línea, Contenido generado por el usuario, Gestión de marca

Details

Spanish Journal of Marketing - ESIC, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2444-9709

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Deborah C. Fowler, Mitzi K. Lauderdale, Ben K. Goh and Jingxue (Jessica) Yuan

This study seeks to assess international tourists' perception of safety while shopping in the USA, using Las Vegas as the study site. Over recent years, Las Vegas became…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to assess international tourists' perception of safety while shopping in the USA, using Las Vegas as the study site. Over recent years, Las Vegas became an international destination for visitors from the Asia‐Pacific region to celebrate Chinese New Year. In February 2007, Las Vegas hosted the NBA All‐Star Game for the first time from February 16 to 18. The two major events occurred over the same weekend. When two cultures shared a single site, however, the combination presented an issue of safety concern.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using an intercept methodology over the three‐day period in a major shopping venue/casino from February 15 to 17, 2007.

Findings

The study finds that many of the tourists carried a large amount of cash on their person. As the week progressed, Asian visitors were less likely to feel their person and belongings were safe in the three major venues researched of restaurants, shopping centers, and amusement parks.

Originality/value

Few papers have addressed the safety concerns of international tourists in the USA, specifically in Las Vegas. Findings of this study contribute to the safety and security management of various tourist venues.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Jessica L. Hurst, Linda K. Good and Phil Gardner

The purpose of this study is to investigate interns’ supervisory support expectations, psychological contract obligations, job satisfaction, perception of advancement…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate interns’ supervisory support expectations, psychological contract obligations, job satisfaction, perception of advancement opportunities and affective organisational commitment in an attempt to gain a better understanding of how these variables influence interns’ conversion intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

This study focuses on college juniors and seniors who were enrolled in retail/service programs at one of three major US universities, and successfully completed a retail/service internship. An online survey was used to assess the influence of interns’ psychological contract expectations regarding employer obligations, supervisory support expectations, job satisfaction, perception of advancement opportunities, and affective organisational commitment on interns’ conversion intentions (intent to accept an offer for full‐time employment).

Findings

Findings indicate that employers can establish a foundation for intern retention by fulfilling obligations, both implicitly and explicitly. Furthermore, to ensure continued success of their interns, retailers should rely on supervisors and/or mentors to provide guidance, support and feedback.

Research limitations/implications

Research is limited to students who completed a retail/service internship during 2008.

Practical implications

Results provide practical implications to aid in internship program development, assist in interns’ educational and professional development, and enhance the likelihood of successful conversion of interns to employees for retail/service businesses.

Originality/value

This paper is based on actual feedback from interns. Findings will assist retailers in identifying how they can differentiate their internship programs from their competitors’, and how they can increase internship conversion rates. Additionally, the paper identifies salient factors that motivate interns to accept an offer for full‐time employment from their internship company.

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Jessica L. Hurst and Linda K. Good

The transition from higher education to employment is a major life change for many college seniors (currently, the Generation Y cohort). The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

The transition from higher education to employment is a major life change for many college seniors (currently, the Generation Y cohort). The purpose of this paper is to enhance the understanding of Generation Y and to present new insights regarding Gen Y's retail career expectations, perceptions of retail careers, future psychological contract/entitlement perceptions of retail careers, and career exploration of the US retailing industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilizing quantitative research methods via an on‐line survey, the authors examined 193 Gen Y college seniors' retail career perceptions and expectations, and explored the influence these factors have on future psychological contract/entitlement perceptions of employer‐employee obligations and retail career exploration from nine US universities.

Findings

College seniors' pre‐entry retail job expectations, perceptions of retail careers, and future psychological contract/entitlement perceptions of employee obligations were significant predictors of career exploration; college seniors' preconceived notions of retail careers, combined with what they feel they would owe their future employer, are instrumental in determining retail career exploration decisions.

Research limitations/implications

Findings suggest directions for university faculty, academic advisors, and industry practitioners on facilitating college seniors' transitions from higher education to the world of work by suggesting recruitment strategies that can attract, retain and motivate Gen Y.

Originality/value

The findings provide useful criteria for organizational development strategies to assist with the transition from higher education to the workforce and may also improve the success of recruiting Gen Y employees. In addition, the conceptualization of psychological contracts (i.e. entitlement perceptions) differentiates this study from prior psychological contract research.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2018

Nelesh Dhanpat, Tlou Manakana, Jessica Mbacaza, Dineo Mokone and Busisiwe Mtongana

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between employee retention and job security and the impact of retention factors on the job security of nurses…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between employee retention and job security and the impact of retention factors on the job security of nurses in public hospitals in South Africa. The retention of nurses is essential in public hospitals in South Africa. It is therefore critical that retention strategies are primed to ensure the job security of nurses.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is quantitative in nature, adopts a cross-sectional approach and is set within a positivist research paradigm. Pre-established questionnaires were used to collect data. Non-probability sampling was used to select a convenience sample. Questionnaires were distributed to three public hospitals in Johannesburg and 202 responses were received. The psychometric properties of the questionnaire were established through validity and reliability. Inferential and descriptive statistics were deployed to analyse data.

Findings

The study established that there is a relationship between retention factors and job security. The study further identified retention factors as predictors of job security and noted that training and development was the strongest predictor of job security amongst nurses. In addition, the study contributes towards research on retention practices of nurses from a South African perspective.

Practical implications

The study recommendations are diagrammatically represented. If implemented by human resource practitioners and nursing management, they are likely to enhance job security.

Originality/value

The study provides insights on the retention of nursing professionals in public hospitals in Gauteng and identifies retention factors which contribute most towards job security.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Fang Meng and Yingjiao Xu

This research attempts to expand the understanding of the nature of tourist shopping behavior. More specifically, this study aims to explore the influences of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This research attempts to expand the understanding of the nature of tourist shopping behavior. More specifically, this study aims to explore the influences of the components of planned behavior, impulsive behavior, and experiential consumption on tourists' intentions to shop/purchase in the tourism context.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual study reviews and investigates the major current research in the areas of planned behavior, impulse purchase, experiential consumption, as well as tourism shopping behavior/experience. By reviewing and assessing important relevant concepts, this study proposes a conceptual framework of tourist shopping behavior.

Findings

Based on the extensive review and discussion of the related literature, this study proposes that tourist shopping intention and actual purchase behavior are influenced by various indicators, including planned behavior, impulsive behavior, and experiential consumption factors. In other words, tourist shopping behavior is a mixture of planned, impulsive, and experiential consumption behavior.

Originality/value

The study of tourism shopping is still limited and in an exploratory stage. The resulting theoretical framework of this study is an inclusive overarching structure systematically explaining the nature of tourist shopping behavior from the perspectives of planned behavior, impulsive buying, and experiential consumption. This study is expected to provide better information and understanding of the factors influencing tourist shopping behavior, which, in turn, will lead to improved planning, marketing and management of sales, expenditures and opportunities in the tourism and retail industries.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Tammy R. Kinley, Judith A. Forney and Youn‐Kyung Kim

Shopping is a popular tourist activity. While a person might not travel for the purpose of shopping, many tourists shop while traveling. This study aims to examine travel…

Abstract

Purpose

Shopping is a popular tourist activity. While a person might not travel for the purpose of shopping, many tourists shop while traveling. This study aims to examine travel motivation as a predictor of the importance assigned to desired shopping center attributes for three different shopping centers, and their effect on satisfaction, and re‐patronage intention.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via mall‐intercept surveys from 624 tourist shoppers at seven shopping centers. A tourist was defined as a person who traveled a distance of at least 50 miles from their home.

Findings

Desired shopping center attributes are influenced by travel motivation. For the superregional center, a linear relationship was computed for the exploration travel motive, mall environment, overall satisfaction and re‐patronage intention. Interestingly, overall satisfaction with the shopping center was not a significant predictor of re‐patronage intention in the theme/festival or super off‐price centers.

Originality/value

Given the importance of shopping in the travel agenda, identification and consideration of different travel motivations can facilitate development of the shopping center environment for maximum customer satisfaction. All of the motivations may co‐exist in the same family or tourist unit (e.g. convention attendees). These findings can be particularly useful in designing amenities and targeting promotional campaigns to different audiences.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2019

Richa Pandey and V. Mary Jessica

The purpose of this study is to explain the relationship between behavioural biases, investment satisfaction and reinvestment intention considering the effect of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explain the relationship between behavioural biases, investment satisfaction and reinvestment intention considering the effect of evolutionary psychology. The study believes that biases are not at all times bad; sometimes, biases can assist the individual investor to select the top course of action and allow them to go for the less costly mistakes, thereby helping in achieving satisficing behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using structured and a close-ended questionnaire from a sample of 560 respondents by using multi-stage stratified sampling method. PLS-SEM was used for preliminary validation of the questionnaire. Mediation model using the structural equation model (SEM) with the help of AMOS 20 was used for the analyses. Pre-requisite assumptions for SEM were checked by using sample characteristics. The study has three constructs with multiple items; hence, the instrument validation was done by measuring the construct validity and reliability using Cronbach’s alpha, exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis with the help of SPSS 20 and AMOS 20.

Findings

The study confirms that behavioural biases influence investment decisions in the real estate market. Further, investment satisfaction is found to have a significant and complementary partial mediating effect. The positive mediating effect of investment satisfaction between behavioural biases and reinvestment intention shows that biases are natural tendencies in response to limit to learning which can be explained by evolutionary psychology.

Research limitations/implications

There are chances that the result obtained here is because of myopic decision-making behaviour in which the long-time horizon is not considered and behavioural biases, as well as evolutionary psychology, are adaptive, so the result may change in the long-time horizon, which seeks further investigations. The study talked about the relationship between behavioural biases, investment satisfaction and reinvestment intention; it will be interesting to bring some more constructs in this model, for example, investment intention and reinvestment behaviour; this can deliver a more precise picture in this regard.

Practical implications

Understanding such relationships will help in better clarity about the way investment is made. The study confirms that market behaviour in the real estate market is sub-optimal, which shows that there is an opportunity for attentive investors by trading and gathering on information. Real estate practitioners can get clues from market anomalies and investor phenomena; understanding these may suggest ways to use them in the market.

Social implications

Reforms in the housing sector do not only satisfy one of the basic needs but also leads to holistic economic development. Besides direct contribution, it contributes to social capital.

Originality/value

The study extends the current knowledge base about the relationship between behavioural biases, investment satisfaction and reinvestment intention. This study investigates the behavioural biases influencing the real estate market investment decisions of non-professional investors considering the effect of evolutionary psychology.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2019

Balkrushna Potdar, Tony Garry, John Guthrie and Juergen Gnoth

The purpose of this paper is to explore how interactional justice within a retail context may influence employee organizational commitment and how this may evoke…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how interactional justice within a retail context may influence employee organizational commitment and how this may evoke guardianship behaviors that manifest in shoplifting prevention.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses a phenomenological approach conducting semi-structured in-depth interviews with 26 shop-floor employees of two major national supermarket chains in New Zealand.

Findings

The findings suggest that interactional justice in the workplace is important in shaping organizational commitment amongst employees. Additionally, heightened organizational commitment may have a significant effect on employee propensity to engage in shoplifting prevention/guardianship behavior. A conceptual model is developed based on these findings.

Practical implications

Retail managers may promote and exercise interactional justice practices with employees to improve their organizational commitment and consequential shoplifting prevention/guardianship behaviors.

Originality/value

The contribution of this paper is threefold. First, and from a theoretical perspective, it offers both a conceptual foundation and empirical-based evaluation of interactional justice and its effect on organizational commitment and, specifically, on guardianship/shoplifting prevention behaviors. Second, and from a pragmatic perspective, the conceptual model derived from this research may assist retailers in developing interactional justice strategies that encourage organizational commitment of employees that consequently leads to employees’ guardianship/shoplifting prevention behaviors. Finally, it explores significance and role of employee perceptions of interactional justice, employee workplace attachment and organizational commitment within the context of retail crime prevention.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2008

Anna Essén and Solveig Wikström

This paper aims to explore the role of emotions in consumers' evaluations of service quality.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the role of emotions in consumers' evaluations of service quality.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses empirical qualitative data from in‐depth interviews with 26 senior citizens who are consumers of long‐term residential care services in a Swedish rural community. The empirical findings are analysed inductively in terms of dimensions derived from the literature on the role of emotions in consumers' evaluations of service quality.

Findings

When explaining their overall evaluations of service quality, the respondents referred exclusively to service dimensions that had evoked emotional reactions. However, although these service dimensions were the only ones to influence the consumers' perceptions of service quality, respondents tended to reflect about these dimensions in a cognitive manner. The remaining service dimensions, which did not evoke any emotional memories, did not influence the respondents' perceptions of the overall quality of services rendered.

Research limitations/implications

Emotional reactions can direct the attention of consumers to certain service dimensions, and subsequently trigger cognitive evaluations of these dimensions. The emotional and cognitive responses of consumers to services are thus interrelated. More research is needed into the mechanism of this interaction.

Practical implications

Service providers should recognise that consumers' emotional and cognitive reactions are intertwined. For providers of aged‐care services, this study suggests certain service dimensions that are worthy of further attention in seeking positive evaluations of services from users.

Originality/value

Previous research has tended to distinguish between emotional and cognitive evaluations of services. This study challenges this distinction by demonstrating that dimensions that have traditionally been viewed as “non‐emotional” can be influenced by “emotional” reactions. Thus, the study shows that “emotional bias” can lead to some dimensions having a disproportionate influence on overall evaluations of service.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

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