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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2019

Jill Allen, Jessi L. Smith and Lynda B. Ransdell

As universities grapple with broadening participation of women in science, many ADVANCE funded institutions hone in on transforming search committee practices to better…

Abstract

Purpose

As universities grapple with broadening participation of women in science, many ADVANCE funded institutions hone in on transforming search committee practices to better consider dual-career partners and affirmative action hires (“opportunity hires”). To date, there is a lack of empirical research on the consequences and processes underlying such a focus. The purpose of this paper is to examine whether and how two ADVANCE-recommended hiring practices, dual-career hiring and affirmative action hiring, help or hinder women’s participation in academic science.

Design/methodology/approach

In two experiments, the authors tested what happens to a science candidate’s evaluation and offer when that candidate reveals he or she has a dual-career partner (vs is a solo-candidate, Experiment 1) or if it is revealed that the candidate under review is the dual-hire partner or is a target of opportunity hire (vs primary candidate, Experiment 2). A random US national sample of academic scientists provided anonymous external recommendations to an ostensible faculty search committee.

Findings

Evaluators supported the job offer to a primary candidate requiring a heterosexual partner accommodation. This good news, however, was offset by the results of Experiment 2, which showed that support for the partner or affirmative action candidate depended on the evaluator’s gender. Taken together, the research identifies important personal and contextual features that sometimes do – and sometimes do not – impact hiring perceptions of women in science.

Originality/value

The authors believe the effects of such an emphasis on opportunity hires within ADVANCE funded institutions may be considerable and inform changes to policies and practices that help bring about gender equality.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2019

Romy Chammas, Jessy El-Hayek, Mira Fatayri, Reine Makdissi and Christelle Bou-Mitri

The development and commerce of functional foods (FF) is complex, expensive and risky. Besides technological obstacles and legislative aspects, consumer demands also need…

Abstract

Purpose

The development and commerce of functional foods (FF) is complex, expensive and risky. Besides technological obstacles and legislative aspects, consumer demands also need to be considered. The purpose of this study is to assess the Lebanese consumer’s knowledge, attitudes and acceptance of FF and functional ingredients.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional study recruited a convenience sample of adults living in Mount Lebanon in 2015. An interviewer-based questionnaire assessed socio-demographic factors, medical status, consumption and knowledge of FF and FI ingredients. The data were analyzed using statistical package for social sciences.

Findings

Out of 251 respondents, 40.6 and 32.0 per cent were knowledgeable about FF and FI, respectively, and 67.3 per cent consumed them. Calcium (48.0 per cent) and omega-3 (38.6 per cent) were identified as the most important FI. The consumption of FF was mainly owing to their nutritional benefits beyond basic nutrition (44.2 per cent); however, fearing artificial additives and their side effects (33.4 per cent) were reasons for rejecting them. FF knowledge was higher among young (p = 0.005) and single individuals (p = 0.002) and those going to the gym (p = 0.001), whereas willingness to learn about them was only associated with higher education (p < 0.001). Prebiotic yogurt consumption was higher among gym visitors (p = 0.017) and knowers of FF (p < 0.001). The consumption of protein bars and shakes was higher among males and those going to the gym (p < 0.001). The consumption of cereal bars was higher among young individuals, single, with high income, going to the gym and knowledgeable about FF (p < 0.05).

Originality/value

The findings are useful for market orientation, development and successfully negotiating new market opportunities of FF for both food industries and policymakers.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 49 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 22 May 2017

Marisha L. Humphries and Iheoma U. Iruka

Inequalities in education have existed since the beginning of formal education. Educational disparities often emerge as you compare groups of students based on race…

Abstract

Inequalities in education have existed since the beginning of formal education. Educational disparities often emerge as you compare groups of students based on race, ethnicity, socioeconomic class, gender, and geography. This chapter seeks to stress the important role that early childhood experiences, including specific structures and processes during these foundational years play in potentially preventing the educational gaps of Black students. This requires intentional shifting from solely focusing on educational gaps to one that focuses on specific practices and policies that must be implemented to ensure that Black children are afforded the opportunities to meet their potential.

Details

African American Children in Early Childhood Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-258-9

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Jessy Nair, Aarthy Chellasamy and B.N. Balaji Singh

Extant literature regarding factors essential for successful information technologies (IT) implementation in small and medium enterprises (SMEs) does not significantly…

Abstract

Purpose

Extant literature regarding factors essential for successful information technologies (IT) implementation in small and medium enterprises (SMEs) does not significantly address readiness factors for IT implementation in an Indian context. This exploratory research develops and tests a framework to analyse the antecedents to organisational preparedness for adoption of IT infrastructure in SMEs.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory research adopts a mixed-method approach to test the technology, organization and environment (TOE) framework. In-depth interviews with SME owners are conducted to develop the case study, and the measures obtained are tested through a survey at a small and medium business industrial cluster in Southern India in SMEs.

Findings

The case study indicates SME owners’ drive to initiate technology preparedness for organisational sustainability is a key factor, a measure not seen during the literature review. An empirical study tests the measures. Pressure from customers, owner’s age, sales of SME, owner’s attitude towards IT and owner’s knowledge of IT was confirmed, which indicates organisational factors have more impact compared to technological and environmental factors.

Research limitations/implications

The academic scope of this research paper can be extended to contexts such as readiness in IT infrastructure for digital transformation.

Practical implications

The validated research framework can be used by organisation stakeholders and SME IT practitioners for successful IT adoption.

Social implications

SMEs contribute significantly to gross domestic product (GDP) and provide employment opportunities. Hence, this research provides a tested model that SMEs owners/managers can adopt as a framework to augment competitiveness to implement IT.

Originality/value

The study adopts a mixed-method research design and is, perhaps, a first in the Indian context to explore variables through case study and validate identified measures through an empirical study. The model can be used by SME owners and practitioners to ascertain factors for organisational preparedness for IT adoption.

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Giovanni Battista Dagnino, Gabriella Levanti and Arabella Mocciaro Li Destri

This chapter aims to identify the main determinants that define the architectural properties of network emergence and significantly influence the dynamics underlying…

Abstract

This chapter aims to identify the main determinants that define the architectural properties of network emergence and significantly influence the dynamics underlying network evolution in time. The identification and analysis of these determinants, as well as the dynamic processes tied to them, allows to appreciate the competitive bases and consequences of network morphology. To this purpose, using a complex systems perspective as an integrative conceptual approach, we represent networks as complex dynamic systems of knowledge and capabilities. We perform a comparative in-depth analysis of the processes underlying the emergence and evolution of STMicroelectronic's global network and of Toyota's supplier network in the US so as to allow an elucidatory empirical assessment of the theoretical representation elaborated in the article.

Details

Network Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1442-3

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Jessy El-Hayek Fares, Sibelle Al-Hayek, Jaafar Jaafar, Nathalie Djabrayan and Antoine G. Farhat

This study aims to examine the effect of socio-demographic, lifestyle and dietary factors on body composition among students from a private Lebanese University.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effect of socio-demographic, lifestyle and dietary factors on body composition among students from a private Lebanese University.

Design/methodology/approach

In this cross-sectional study, socio-demographic and lifestyle variables were collected. Height and waist circumference were measured. Inbody 720 (Biospace, Korea) was used to assess body composition (percentage body fat [PBF], visceral fat area [VFA], skeletal muscle mass [SMM]) and fitness score. Diet was assessed using the MEDFICTS (meats, eggs, dairy, fried foods, fat in baked goods, convenience foods, fats added at the table and snacks) questionnaire.

Findings

Out of 392 students, 3.1 per cent were underweight, 59 per cent were normal and 40 per cent were overweight and obese. In women,10.5 per cent adhered to the therapeutic lifestyle changes (TLC) compared to men (2.5 per cent), while 52.5 per cent of men needed dietary changes compared to 39.5 per cent of women, (p < 0.01). The most important predictors of PBF were being a woman, older age, lower fitness score and lower MEDFICTS score. The predictors of VFA were being a man, older age, less sleep time and lower fitness score. Being a man, smoking, higher fitness score and higher MEDFICTS score were predictors of SMM.

Practical implications

Upon university acceptance and as part of usual health screenings in universities, the authors’ study recommends screening of lifestyle and dietary habits of students, identifying students at risk and providing appropriate health interventions tailored to students’ needs.

Originality/value

This study is the first, in Lebanon, to assess the effects of sleep, stress, fitness and dietary habits on body composition of Lebanese university students.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Book part
Publication date: 24 May 2007

Frederic Carluer

“It should also be noted that the objective of convergence and equal distribution, including across under-performing areas, can hinder efforts to generate growth

Abstract

“It should also be noted that the objective of convergence and equal distribution, including across under-performing areas, can hinder efforts to generate growth. Contrariwise, the objective of competitiveness can exacerbate regional and social inequalities, by targeting efforts on zones of excellence where projects achieve greater returns (dynamic major cities, higher levels of general education, the most advanced projects, infrastructures with the heaviest traffic, and so on). If cohesion policy and the Lisbon Strategy come into conflict, it must be borne in mind that the former, for the moment, is founded on a rather more solid legal foundation than the latter” European Commission (2005, p. 9)Adaptation of Cohesion Policy to the Enlarged Europe and the Lisbon and Gothenburg Objectives.

Details

Managing Conflict in Economic Convergence of Regions in Greater Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-451-5

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2013

Paulette Hebert, Mihyun Kang and Jessy Kramp

The purpose of this paper is to examine safety lighting at an existing US government facility.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine safety lighting at an existing US government facility.

Design/methodology/approach

Field measurements of exterior illumination were conducted at four building sites housing laboratories, offices and a cafeteria at night and the findings were compared to the industry recommendations, the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES) safety lighting recommendations.

Findings

Laboratory, office and cafeteria building exteriors were classified as “high hazard” due to area wildlife, potentially dangerous equipment and chemicals, the threat of intruders, and uneven terrain. Some sites' existing light levels fell far below industry recommendations and others greatly exceeded recommendations. Most of the existing lighting was uneven, unsustainable, rendered colors poorly, produced glare and/or remained energized when no one was present.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited by the small number of sites and limited geographical area of the sites. Lighting field studies can improve user safety, save energy and reduce facilities' waste.

Practical implications

This study employs a relatively simple approach to examine safety lighting that facility managers could adapt for their own facilities to inform improvements.

Originality/value

The current lack of lighting field studies, safety lighting research and case studies regarding government facilities is addressed by contributions of this research.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Anders Örtenblad

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Abstract

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Book part
Publication date: 23 July 2015

William Feighery

Political parties and marketers have for centuries employed visuals as effective means of conveying their messages. Yet surprisingly, little has been written on the…

Abstract

Political parties and marketers have for centuries employed visuals as effective means of conveying their messages. Yet surprisingly, little has been written on the evident interplay between the visual rhetoric of political campaigns and destination image. Influenced by Foucault’s notion of subjectivity and drawing on critical discourse analysis, this chapter analyzes the visual rhetoric of the radical right-wing Swiss People’s Party campaign posters in order to explore the relationship between political rhetoric and destination image. It is concluded that while this image of Switzerland may be negatively influenced by the rhetoric of the party, the reflex of the state may inadvertently perpetuate cultural fundamentalism and exclusion.

Details

Tourism Research Frontiers: Beyond the Boundaries of Knowledge
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-993-5

Keywords

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