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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2013

Jeremy Doucet, Xiang Zhang and Philip Irving

This paper aims to present the implementation of a finite element (FE) model used to establish crack and delamination development in a Glare reinforced aluminium plate…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the implementation of a finite element (FE) model used to establish crack and delamination development in a Glare reinforced aluminium plate under fatigue loading. This model predicts the behaviour of bonded GLARE straps used as crack retarders for life extension of aircraft structures. In particular, it takes into account the interaction that exists between the substrate crack and the delamination crack at the interface with the reinforcement.

Design/methodology/approach

In this work, a 3D FE model with three-layer continuum shell elements has been developed to calculate changes in substrate stress intensity and in fatigue crack growth (FCG) rate produced by bonded strap reinforcement. Both circular and elliptical strap delamination geometries were incorporated into the model. Calculated stress intensity factors (SIFs) were used together with measured FCG data for substrate material to predict FCG rates for the strapped condition.

Findings

The model predicted a decrease in the SIF and a retardation of FCG rates. The SIF was predicted to vary through the thickness of the substrate due to the phenomenon of secondary bending and also the bridging effect caused by the presence of the strap. The influence of delamination shape and size on substrate crack stress intensity and delamination strain energy release rate has been calculated.

Originality/value

This research aims at developing modelling techniques that could be used when studying larger reinforced structures found in aircraft.

Details

International Journal of Structural Integrity, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9864

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2014

Xiaocan (Lucy) Wang, Natalie Bulick and Valentine Muyumba

The purpose of this paper is to describe the Electronic Theses and Dissertations program implemented and managed by the Indiana State University since 2009. The paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the Electronic Theses and Dissertations program implemented and managed by the Indiana State University since 2009. The paper illustrates issues relating to the background, policies, platform, workflow and cataloging, as well as the publication and preservation of graduate scholarship.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examined many aspects of the Electronic Theses and Dissertations program and addressed issues dealt before, during and after the publication of the electronic theses and dissertations collection. The approaches the authors utilized are literature review and personal management experience from working on the program.

Findings

Implementing an Electronic Theses and Dissertations program involves providing a series of management services. These services include developing relevant policies, implementing an archiving and publication platform and creating submission and publishing workflows, as well as cataloging, disseminating and preserving the student collection. Openly publishing the collection through a range of access points significantly increases its visibility and accessibility. Adopting several archival and preservation strategies ensures the long-term readiness of the collection.

Originality/value

This paper will provide useful practices for implementing an ETD program to those institutions new to the ETD initiative process. It also contributes to the current body of literature and to the overall improvement of ETD programs globally.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

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