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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Tammi Walker, Jenny Shaw, Lea Hamilton, Clive Turpin, Catherine Reid and Kathryn Abel

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of prison staff working with imprisoned women who self-harm in English prisons. In this small-scale study, 14…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of prison staff working with imprisoned women who self-harm in English prisons. In this small-scale study, 14 prison staff in three English prisons were interviewed to examine the strategies currently used by them to support imprisoned women who self-harm.

Design/methodology/approach

Thematic analysis (Braun and Clarke, 2006) was used to identify three key themes: “developing a relationship”, “self-help strategies” and “relational interventions”.

Findings

Many staff expressed some dissatisfaction in the techniques available to support the women, and felt their utility can be restricted by the prison regime.

Research limitations/implications

This study suggests that there is currently a deficit in the provision of training and support for prison staff, who are expected to fulfil a dual role as both custodian and carer of imprisoned women. Further research into prison staff’s perception of the training currently available could highlight gaps between current theory and practice in the management of self-harm and thus indicate content for future training programmes. Research exploring the impact of working with imprisoned women who self-harm is suggested to identify strategies for supporting staff. It must be acknowledged that this is a small-scale qualitative study and the findings are from only three prisons and may not apply to staff in other settings.

Originality/value

Currently few studies have focussed on the perspective of prison staff. This study is one of very few studies which focusses on the techniques and resources available to support the women, from the perspective of the prison staff.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Book part
Publication date: 6 August 2020

Jenny Lawrence, Hollie Shaw, Leanne Hunt and Donovan Synmoie

This chapter attempts to capture what teaching excellence looks and feels like for students. Our research reports on research conducted by two student authors at separate…

Abstract

This chapter attempts to capture what teaching excellence looks and feels like for students. Our research reports on research conducted by two student authors at separate institutions. It suggests that the most crucial aspect of the student experience of ‘teaching excellence’ is a teacher's ability to build rapport and create meaningful interpersonal relationships with their students. Leanne Hunt's research was conducted with her fellow students at the University of Bradford. She outlines how, for her participants, the student–teacher rapport informed a positive learning experience which translated into a mutual understanding of excellent teaching. Widening participation, college-based HE student Hollie Shaw, now at Sheffield Hallam University, defines teaching excellence as flexible enough to respond to student learning needs, but strong enough to inspire interest in the discipline. In this chapter, we consider their separate testimonies carefully: we argue that exploring unconscious bias furthers understanding of how differences between student and teacher may compromise interpersonal relations and so student recognition of a tutor's positive and crucial role in the student experience and the implications of how one might measure this given the emphasis on proxies for teaching excellence in the TEF. We suggest breaking down unconscious bias calls for embracing differences, reflection and recognising the complexities of contemporary staff and student university lives. This chapter's exploration of staff–student partnership opens up potential for the creation of more equitable and honest learning dynamics in higher education – where a nuanced understanding of ‘teaching excellence’ can be defined, understood and evidenced within a HEI, with external bodies such as the Office for Students, and included in the Teaching Excellence Framework.

Details

Challenging the Teaching Excellence Framework
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-536-8

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Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2010

Michelle K. Duffy, Jason D. Shaw, Jenny M. Hoobler and Bennett J. Tepper

We extend emotional-labor research by developing a time-based theory of the effects of emotion regulation in emotional-labor performance. Drawing on Gross's (1998a…

Abstract

We extend emotional-labor research by developing a time-based theory of the effects of emotion regulation in emotional-labor performance. Drawing on Gross's (1998a) process model, we argue that antecedent- and response-focused regulatory styles can be used to make differential predictions about outcomes such as performance, health, and antisocial behavior and that these effects differ in shorter- and longer-time windows. We discuss the theoretical implications and address the strengths and limitations of our approach.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-126-9

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2006

Adrian Hayes and Gill Lever‐Green

Suicide prevention is a priority issue in HM Prison Service of England and Wales. Past training in this area has concentrated on the completion of paperwork over direct…

Abstract

Suicide prevention is a priority issue in HM Prison Service of England and Wales. Past training in this area has concentrated on the completion of paperwork over direct interactions with suicidal people. HM Prison Service commissioned STORM, a training scheme focusing on interviewing skills and the identification of risk factors, successfully used in community health settings, piloted it in five prisons and retained it as part of its compulsory training for prison assessors of suicide risk. Although from spring 2007 STORM will no longer be compulsory, its impact has been shown in plans for future development of training.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Adrian J. Hayes, Daniel Pratt and Jenny Shaw

A new service was developed to provide transitional care between acute and secure services for people with serious mental illness who are considered “difficult to manage”…

Abstract

Purpose

A new service was developed to provide transitional care between acute and secure services for people with serious mental illness who are considered “difficult to manage”. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the work of the service by examining referrals made, strategies employed for each referral, and patient outcomes, as well as investigating issues in the service's development and implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

A retrospective descriptive study by review of 38 case notes, and qualitative interviews of 47 staff within the service and those referring to the service.

Findings

In the first eight months, 38 patients were referred due to violence, aggression and management problems. Most interventions provided by the service involved working with referring staff, rather than direct patient contact. Subsequently, 16 per cent required referral to higher levels of security. Interviews showed the team's aims needed to be more clearly established, but that ward staff found the service to be a useful and productive resource.

Research limitations/implications

The study is descriptive and retrospective, but showed that the service provided appropriate interventions for managing patients with serious mental illness and challenging behaviour.

Practical implications

A transitional service may have value in keeping patients in the least restrictive setting. Careful planning is needed in designing novel interventions, ensuring clear aims and effective management.

Originality/value

The service under study was novel, and may be useful in facilitating successful transfer from, or preventing admission to, secure services.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Abstract

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 February 2008

Abstract

Details

Education + Training, vol. 50 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2009

Ian Shaw

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2018

Daniel Baxter, Jenny Flinn and Lucrezia Flurina Picco

The purpose of this paper is to investigate major event related terrorism and the resulting challenges that event professionals may face when hosting major events in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate major event related terrorism and the resulting challenges that event professionals may face when hosting major events in cities as part of a destination marketing strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was based in the UK due to the significant rise in terrorist activities that have taken place in its urban cities in recent years. The exploratory nature of this study utilised semi-structured interviews with UK event professionals, enabling a preliminary, in-depth investigation of the challenges that events professionals face as a result of major event related terrorism.

Findings

The research findings identify three challenges faced by event professionals when organising major events: knowledge and understanding in relation to major event related terrorism; the impact of major event related terrorism in terms of responsibility and accountability; and managing for major event related terrorism in budgetary terms.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to the UK, other destinations will pose their own unique challenges when hosting and managing events. It is suggested that this research be evaluated against similar studies in other destinations. This is a preliminary study and each of the topics identified within the findings warrant further exploration in their own right.

Originality/value

The paper offers an insight into the challenges faced by event professionals in the UK when delivering major events as part of a destination marketing strategy. With the increase in major event related terrorism in cities the findings of this research are of relevance not only to event professionals but anyone with a role in destination and tourism development.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1970

Alexander Law

ALLAN RAMSAY'S The Gentle Shepherd is one of these dramas that few people nowadays have read or seen. True, the production in The Royal High School during two of the…

Abstract

ALLAN RAMSAY'S The Gentle Shepherd is one of these dramas that few people nowadays have read or seen. True, the production in The Royal High School during two of the earlier Edinburgh Festivals drew the attention of many to this old favourite, and the charm of Ramsay's words and songs produced in the classic setting of the old High School hall is such a pleasant memory that a revival at some future Festival would be welcome.

Details

Library Review, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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