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Article
Publication date: 27 August 2020

Michaela Jackson, Lukas Parker, Linda Brennan and Jenny Robinson

After comprehensive review of discourse surrounding school-banking programmes and marketing to children, the authors develop evidence-based guidelines for such programmes…

Abstract

Purpose

After comprehensive review of discourse surrounding school-banking programmes and marketing to children, the authors develop evidence-based guidelines for such programmes. Guidance for organisations is provided to ensure they understand these products' impact on children and other vulnerable consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive, systematised review of literature related to school-banking programmes was undertaken during 2019, 22 Boolean searches were collated, appraised using a five-step quality appraisal framework and analysed against selection criteria. To accommodate literature across disciplines, quality appraisal combined two existing hierarchies of evidence and peer-review status.

Findings

Searches returned over 375,000 articles; 149 were relevant and met quality thresholds. Evidence supports the role of financial education in producing positive financial outcomes. However, education should involve communities and families to enhance consumer socialisation and limit negative consequences. From this, guidelines are presented accounting for students' and parents' ability to understand marketing messages and the impact of in-school marketing on students – including on longer-term perceptions, attitudes and behaviours.

Practical implications

Guidelines are to assist financial institutions, policymakers and schools balance the benefits of financial literacy and education with potentially negative consequences of school-banking programmes. Classifying programmes as marketing rather than CSR also benefits organisations contributing corporate resources and voluntarily engaging practices underpinned by commitment to community well-being.

Originality/value

Avoiding moral panic, the authors instead outline evidence-based guidelines on school-banking programmes. The quality appraisal process used in this review offers a new approach to synthesising inter-disciplinary evidence.

Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Richard Harris

Consideration needs to be given to the difference [that] the diversity of cities makes to theory.Robinson (2002, p. 549)

Abstract

Consideration needs to be given to the difference [that] the diversity of cities makes to theory.Robinson (2002, p. 549)

Details

Suburbanization in Global Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-348-5

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Abstract

Details

Mediated Millennials
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-078-3

Book part
Publication date: 22 April 2003

Lawrence Angus, Ilana Snyder and Wendy Sutherland-Smith

This chapter reports research conducted in Melbourne, Australia that is focused on the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in schools and families…

Abstract

This chapter reports research conducted in Melbourne, Australia that is focused on the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in schools and families. The emphasis is on the relationship between technology, learning, culture and (dis)advantage. It is generally agreed that ICTs are associated with major social, cultural, pedagogical and lifestyle changes, although the nature of those changes is subject to conflicting norms and interpretations. In this chapter we adopt a critical, multi-disciplined, relational perspective in order to examine the influence of ICTs, in schools and homes, on a sample of students and their families.

Details

Investigating Educational Policy Through Ethnography
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-018-0

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Mark Hofer and Kathleen Owings Swan

If integrating technology means nothing more than enhancing the traditional delivery system of social studies content, where laptops replace notebooks, where PowerPoint…

Abstract

If integrating technology means nothing more than enhancing the traditional delivery system of social studies content, where laptops replace notebooks, where PowerPoint slides replace handwritten overheads, where e-textbooks replace hard copy textbooks, then we will be no closer to the NCSS vision of transformative, powerful social studies instruction. (Doolittle & Hicks, 2003, p.75)

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 8 December 2021

Abstract

Details

Media, Development and Democracy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-492-9

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 25 March 2021

Abstract

Details

Theorizing Criminality and Policing in the Digital Media Age
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-112-4

Book part
Publication date: 11 November 2019

David J. Park

This research draws on qualitative interviews with primarily lower socioeconomic status (SES) public library internet users to illuminate their perceptions of economic…

Abstract

This research draws on qualitative interviews with primarily lower socioeconomic status (SES) public library internet users to illuminate their perceptions of economic benefits afforded by the internet. This powerful evidence challenges utopian new technological theories. The results from this study allow for the comparison of perspectives from Millennials, Generation Xers, Boomers, and the Silent generation. These results suggest a disconnect between the cultural mythology around the internet as an all-powerful tool and the lived experiences of lower SES respondents. Lower SES participants primarily use the internet to train and educate themselves in areas where they would like to work in the process of applying for jobs using the internet. Participants recognized marginal benefits such as socialization and less burdensome job application processes. However, they struggled to identify significant job-related benefits when comparing applying for jobs online as opposed to applying for jobs in person. With the exception of millennials, all generational groups believed in the economic promise of the internet to make their lives easier given enough time. Millennials, however, challenged the techno-utopianism expressed by other generations. Only millennials recognized the realities of digital inequalities that make techno-utopian outcomes unattainable given broader economic realities for low-SES individuals.

Details

Mediated Millennials
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-078-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1978

John Robinson

Discussions about an Open College — a system of flexible learning opportunities for those aiming at ends other than degrees and diplomas — have gathered strength and…

Abstract

Discussions about an Open College — a system of flexible learning opportunities for those aiming at ends other than degrees and diplomas — have gathered strength and subsided many times in the UK during the last fifteen years. It is not widely known that during the period 1963–1965, when Sir Harold Wilson (then Opposition Leader and Prime Minister Wilson) was making his challenging speeches about a University of the Air and the academic and newspaper fraternities were both having fun with ‘telly degrees’, the senior educationists at the BBC were in close discussion with HM Inspectorate and DES officials on an equally ambitious but less charismatic project. This was a proposal for using radio and television in close collaboration with correspondence courses and local tuition to extend opportunities in technical and commercial education and in preparatory courses for higher education: in other words, an Open College. It was Miss Jenny Lee's insistence that the new institution must be ‘a university, and nothing less than a university’ that finally closed the files on those discussions; and, in terms of political survival through a period of recession, no doubt she was right.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 20 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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