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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Stephen A. Doyle and Jenny Reid

This paper aims to consider the adaptability of the traditional growth strategies of couture/fashion houses in the context of non‐fashion sectors.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to consider the adaptability of the traditional growth strategies of couture/fashion houses in the context of non‐fashion sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

By means of a case study approach based upon David Linley & Co. Ltd, a furniture design company, it explores the relevance of implementing a strategy based upon product extension as a means to market development and internationalisation.

Findings

The research demonstrates the distinct and conscious similarities between the strategy adopted by the company and that of the fashion houses as delineated in the literature. The paper concludes that there is value in pan‐sector consideration in respect of strategic planning, particularly when there are acknowledged similarities in the relative positioning of the companies within their markets.

Originality/value

Provides information on the strategic thinking of one company – based on the probable experiences and expectations of customers – which may have wider applicability in other areas of the fahion industry.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 18 May 2001

Calvin J. Larson

This chapter focuses on child abuse in the United States, how it is defined and measured, and its behavioral and social consequences. Throughout, the discussion is guided…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on child abuse in the United States, how it is defined and measured, and its behavioral and social consequences. Throughout, the discussion is guided by concern with the organizations involved in confronting child abuse, from identifying its diverse forms and documenting their prevalence to policy formation and programmatic response. Major topics examined include the cycle of violence thesis, prevention and treatment, and problems and issues related to conceptual ambiguity (in particular, the absence of a generally accepted operational definition of child abuse) such as theoretical fragmentation and important knowledge gaps. Chief among the conclusions is the absence of the organizational unity and financial support necessary to facilitate the acquisition of the knowledge prerequisite to developing informed social policy and devising effective action programs.

Details

The Organizational Response to Social Problems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-716-6

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Tammi Walker, Jenny Shaw, Lea Hamilton, Clive Turpin, Catherine Reid and Kathryn Abel

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of prison staff working with imprisoned women who self-harm in English prisons. In this small-scale study, 14…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of prison staff working with imprisoned women who self-harm in English prisons. In this small-scale study, 14 prison staff in three English prisons were interviewed to examine the strategies currently used by them to support imprisoned women who self-harm.

Design/methodology/approach

Thematic analysis (Braun and Clarke, 2006) was used to identify three key themes: “developing a relationship”, “self-help strategies” and “relational interventions”.

Findings

Many staff expressed some dissatisfaction in the techniques available to support the women, and felt their utility can be restricted by the prison regime.

Research limitations/implications

This study suggests that there is currently a deficit in the provision of training and support for prison staff, who are expected to fulfil a dual role as both custodian and carer of imprisoned women. Further research into prison staff’s perception of the training currently available could highlight gaps between current theory and practice in the management of self-harm and thus indicate content for future training programmes. Research exploring the impact of working with imprisoned women who self-harm is suggested to identify strategies for supporting staff. It must be acknowledged that this is a small-scale qualitative study and the findings are from only three prisons and may not apply to staff in other settings.

Originality/value

Currently few studies have focussed on the perspective of prison staff. This study is one of very few studies which focusses on the techniques and resources available to support the women, from the perspective of the prison staff.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 27 December 2013

Ashleigh Thompson

Previous quantitative research documents that college students with disabilities do not attain higher education at rates equal to their nondisabled peers. This qualitative…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous quantitative research documents that college students with disabilities do not attain higher education at rates equal to their nondisabled peers. This qualitative study posits that socioeconomic status (SES) is a determinant of this discrepancy, and explores how SES and disability shape the college experience of New York City (NYC) students with learning disabilities (LDs), specifically.

Methodology

Research findings from semi-structured interviews with students with LDs (n = 10) at a low-SES and a high-SES colleges are presented against the backdrop of administrative data from NYC baccalaureate-granting colleges (n = 44), disability staff surveys (n = 21), and disability staff interviews (n = 9). Examined through the lens of political economy, qualitative data demonstrate the ways colleges create environments that enable or hinder student success through difference in policy implementation.

Findings

Student themes like stress, identity, and entitlement are discussed against the theoretical and empirical exploration of the intersectionality of SES and disability. Socioeconomic differences are linked to variation in students’ college choice, accessing evaluations, requesting accommodations, and receiving supplementary supports.

Details

Disability and Intersecting Statuses
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-157-1

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2019

Sanket Sunand Dash and Lalatendu Kesari Jena

The purpose of this paper is to define workplace victimization as any behavior that impairs employees’ basic psychological needs and explores the mutually interactive…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to define workplace victimization as any behavior that impairs employees’ basic psychological needs and explores the mutually interactive association between trait self-deception; emotional neglect, especially by supervisors, and workplace victimization.

Design/methodology/approach

Workplace victimization is identified as a pervasive problem in organization. This paper zeroes in on self-deception and emotional neglect as two possible antecedents of workplace victimization, explores the genesis of the two concepts and analyzes their conceptual relationship with each other and with workplace victimization. Based on the conceptual analysis, it identifies the lack of intentionality as a common element in both constructs and identifies a set of possible frameworks linking self-deception, emotional neglect and workplace victimization for future research.

Findings

This paper explores four possible frameworks to model the expected association while advocating for investigation of these given models to check whether one has considerable expository success than other by either connecting or disassociating these two constructs.

Research limitations/implications

The amount of linkage between self-deception and emotional neglect at workplace is worth investigating, and this research paper presents several possible models that might help to focus and organize the future workplace investigations.

Practical implications

The current paper postulates that supervisors’ and subordinates’ ability to display appropriate leadership and follower behavior and interaction will be impaired if they are high in trait self-deception and have been the victim or perpetrators of emotional neglect.

Originality/value

In the workplace, self-deceptive individuals display behaviors such as conscientiousness, resilience, optimism and competitiveness that are considered characteristics of good employees and, hence, are more likely to be promoted to supervisory positions, where emotional neglect of others such as subordinates becomes more pertinent.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 6 August 2020

Jenny Lawrence, Hollie Shaw, Leanne Hunt and Donovan Synmoie

This chapter attempts to capture what teaching excellence looks and feels like for students. Our research reports on research conducted by two student authors at separate…

Abstract

This chapter attempts to capture what teaching excellence looks and feels like for students. Our research reports on research conducted by two student authors at separate institutions. It suggests that the most crucial aspect of the student experience of ‘teaching excellence’ is a teacher's ability to build rapport and create meaningful interpersonal relationships with their students. Leanne Hunt's research was conducted with her fellow students at the University of Bradford. She outlines how, for her participants, the student–teacher rapport informed a positive learning experience which translated into a mutual understanding of excellent teaching. Widening participation, college-based HE student Hollie Shaw, now at Sheffield Hallam University, defines teaching excellence as flexible enough to respond to student learning needs, but strong enough to inspire interest in the discipline. In this chapter, we consider their separate testimonies carefully: we argue that exploring unconscious bias furthers understanding of how differences between student and teacher may compromise interpersonal relations and so student recognition of a tutor's positive and crucial role in the student experience and the implications of how one might measure this given the emphasis on proxies for teaching excellence in the TEF. We suggest breaking down unconscious bias calls for embracing differences, reflection and recognising the complexities of contemporary staff and student university lives. This chapter's exploration of staff–student partnership opens up potential for the creation of more equitable and honest learning dynamics in higher education – where a nuanced understanding of ‘teaching excellence’ can be defined, understood and evidenced within a HEI, with external bodies such as the Office for Students, and included in the Teaching Excellence Framework.

Details

Challenging the Teaching Excellence Framework
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-536-8

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Jenny Poolton, Hossam S. Ismail, Iain R. Reid and Ivan C. Arokiam

To examine the application of the principles of “agile manufacturing” to marketing strategy, planning and management, in the context of small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs).

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the application of the principles of “agile manufacturing” to marketing strategy, planning and management, in the context of small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

Uses the case‐study method to test the development and deployment of “agile marketing” by applying the marketing techniques normally practised only by larger companies, within the “hard” and “soft” constraints imposed by one small company's managerial attitudes, corporate resources and time horizons. The host company was a UK supplier of technological products to other manufacturers; it had no history of marketing. The focus of the study was on the third stage of the agility framework: how a proactive marketing approach can be used to generate new custom.

Findings

“Agile marketing” innovations released latent capacity, and a strategic marketing plan was devised to win new custom. After follow‐up, four new customers had been recruited, and the potential for developing long‐term relations with them was good. This proactive approach was recognised by the company to be a cost‐effective route to business growth, as was the ease with which the plan could be reconfigured when new market niches were to be targeted.

Research limitations/implications

The case study provides one “snapshot” of the outcome of transferring agility principles from manufacturing to marketing. The findings are nonetheless indicative and thought‐provoking.

Practical implications

Such marketing as small companies practise is more likely to be reactive than proactive. They rarely have the resources to take advantage of marketing ideas transferred from the big‐business setting. There are thus many constraints on their ability to respond cost‐effectively and swiftly to changes in their operating environment. The more flexible and reconfigurable the manufacturing and marketing systems, the more likely that growth will be achieved. Any spare capacity can then be channelled into recruiting new customers.

Originality/value

Transfers a planning framework and set of procedures from manufacturing management to marketing strategy and planning in the challenging environment of SMEs.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 12 September 2017

Moosung Lee, Jenny Dean and Yeonjeong Kim

Using data from the Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Study, this study examines the structural relationships between negative school social relationships, school…

Abstract

Using data from the Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Study, this study examines the structural relationships between negative school social relationships, school safety, educational expectation, and academic achievement of Latino immigrant students. Results from multilevel structural equation modeling show that discrimination, unhelpful school social relationships, and experiences of unsafe school environments influence Latino immigrant adolescents’ academic achievement indirectly and directly through their educational expectations. Specifically, this study explores how noncognitive and contextual factors embedded in different structural layers of school organization influence Latino immigrant adolescents’ academic achievement. It draws attention to the impact of negative school factors such as discriminatory and unsupportive school social relationships, and negative and unsafe school structures that undermine school life. Based on our findings, we argue that as Latino immigrant students internalize negative experiences from their school experiences during the critical period of adolescence, such accumulated negative internalization may reinforce negative self-perceptions and inaccurate stereotypes. Not only discrimination but also other negative school features such as the absence of academic supporters, nonacademically oriented friends, and unsafe learning environments inhibit them from navigating positive school opportunities and ultimately, successful school achievement. Implications for the social organization of U.S. public secondary schools with a focus on Latino immigrant adolescents’ academic achievement are discussed.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 September 2020

Matt Fossey, Lauren Godier-McBard, Elspeth A. Guthrie, Jenny Hewison, Peter Trigwell, Chris J. Smith and Allan O. House

The purpose of this paper is to explore the challenges that are experienced by staff responsible for commissioning liaison psychiatry services and to establish if these…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the challenges that are experienced by staff responsible for commissioning liaison psychiatry services and to establish if these are shared by other health professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a mixed-methods design, the findings from a mental health commissioner workshop (n = 12) were used to construct a survey that was distributed to health care professionals using an opportunistic framework (n = 98).

Findings

Four key themes emerged from the workshop, which was tested using the survey. The importance of secure funding; a better understanding of health care systems and pathways; partnership working and co-production and; access to mental health clinical information in general hospitals. There was broad convergence between commissioners, mental health clinicians and managers, except in relation to gathering and sharing of data. This suggests that poor communication between professionals is of concern.

Research limitations/implications

There were a small number of survey respondents (n = 98). The sampling used an opportunistic framework that targeted commissioner and clinician forums. Using an opportunistic framework, the sample may not be representative. Additionally, multiple pairwise comparisons were conducted during the analysis of the survey responses, increasing the risk that significant results were found by chance.

Practical implications

A number of steps were identified that could be applied in practice. These mainly related to the importance of collecting and communicating data and co-production with commissioners in the design, development and monitoring of liaison psychiatry services.

Originality/value

This is the first study that has specifically considered the challenges associated with the commissioning of liaison psychiatry services.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Primary Teachers, Inspection and the Silencing of the Ethic of Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-892-1

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