Search results

1 – 6 of 6
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Rachel Humphris, Hannah Bradby, Beatriz Padilla, Jenny Phillimore, Simon Pemberton and Silja Samerski

Research has long focused on the notion of access and the trajectory towards a healthcare encounter but has neglected what happens to patients after these initial…

Abstract

Purpose

Research has long focused on the notion of access and the trajectory towards a healthcare encounter but has neglected what happens to patients after these initial encounters. This paper focuses attention on what happens after an initial healthcare encounter leading to a more nuanced understanding of how patients from a diverse range of backgrounds make sense of medical advice, how they mix this knowledge with other forms of information and how they make decisions about what to do next.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on 160 in-depth interviews across four European countries the paper problematizes the notion of access; expands the definition of “decision partners”; and reframes the medical encounter as a journey, where one encounter leads to and informs the next.

Findings

This approach reveals the significant unseen, unrecognised and unacknowledged work that patients undertake to solve their health concerns.

Originality/value

De-centring the professional from the healthcare encounter allows us to understand why patients take particular pathways to care and how resources might be more appropriately leveraged to support both patients and professionals along this journey.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Jenny Bronstein

The purpose of this paper is to explore a different perspective about the role that information plays in the integration process of migrant workers by exploring the views…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore a different perspective about the role that information plays in the integration process of migrant workers by exploring the views and opinions of individuals and organizations that work with these communities on a daily basis. The study proposes a new perspective of Ager and Strang’s framework of integration by looking at its different elements through the perspective provided by Gibson and Martin’s (2019) concept of information marginalization and Dervin’s sense-making notion of resistance.

Design/methodology/approach

Ten intermediaries working with migrants were interviewed using semi-structure interviews. They were analyzed using an integrative approach of deductive and inductive content analysis and rendered categories drawn from the theoretical frameworks and categories that emerged from the data.

Findings

The content analysis of the data revealed that information marginalization is characterized by the lack of cultural knowledge and lack of language proficiency that impact the migrants abilities to fulfill their everyday needs, experience a safe and stable environment. Information marginalization results in migrants experiencing self-protective behaviors such as secrecy and an inability to trust information sources that are not contextualized by insiders. Findings show that information resistance can be overcome by making information available in relevant formats and distributed through trusted sources.

Social implications

The study revises the notion of information marginalization by trying to understand the social and cultural gap that from both sides of the issues of integration.

Originality/value

The study presents a different perspective of the role of information in the integration process of migrants by examining the views and opinions of intermediaries working with these populations. Also, the study reframes existing notions of information marginalization and resistance by addressing both sides of the cultural and social gap embodies marginalization.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 76 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Anna Leask and Ivana Rihova

This paper aims to determine the role of heritage tourism in Shetland Island destination development and how this links to tourism public policy in island communities.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine the role of heritage tourism in Shetland Island destination development and how this links to tourism public policy in island communities.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is conducted in the Shetland Islands, located off the north coast of Scotland, UK. Descriptive and inductive approaches are utilized to enable the researchers to recognize multiple social structures and draw conclusions from observations and specific information. Primary research focuses on semi‐structured interviews with key informants. Data is analyzed via a mix of content analysis and interpretation of the responses through a connected narrative approach.

Findings

Seasonality is a key feature of Shetland Island tourism, alongside other key limitations to growth including transport links and climatic conditions. Potential conflicts exist between tourism stakeholders and their perceptions of the effectiveness of the heritage tourism public policy in Shetland, though overall stakeholder collaboration succeeds in enhancing heritage conservation and development.

Practical implications

While the findings relate specifically to the Shetland Islands, the general conclusions offer an example of best practice concerning tourism public policy for heritage‐focused tourism in island communities, which could be used in comparable destinations.

Originality/value

The choice of the Shetland Islands as an example of a cold water island destination offers the opportunity to extend existing research and examine how the community of Shetland embraces the opportunities afforded by tourism as an alternative to traditional industries.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Jessica Langston

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of five men participating in the Mellow Dads Parenting Programme delivered for the first time in an English Prison…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of five men participating in the Mellow Dads Parenting Programme delivered for the first time in an English Prison, in partnership with a neighbouring local authority.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews conducted before and after the programme were analysed through the perspective of a group of community-based peer researchers, former graduates of the community-based programme. The study prioritised the peer researchers’ “insider knowledge”, drawing on a transformative paradigm to illuminate the strengths and challenge the assumptions often held about fathers in the context of vulnerable families.

Findings

Using a thematic framework, the research group found that the programme facilitators were fundamental in providing a safe and nurturing space within which participants could openly reflect and consider their past experiences whilst acquiring new skills. Participants reported changes in their understanding of themselves, their children and their perceptions of accessing parenting groups. The programme’s unique provision of weekly activity sessions without the presence of the children’s mothers enabled the participants to legitimise their role and parent in a way unavailable since their incarceration. The integrated approach to service delivery enabled practitioners from within the prison and the community to adopt a shared culture focused upon the whole family in the context of the ongoing incarceration of the father.

Research limitations/implications

The findings detail the potential in local partnerships between organisations committed to strengthening family connections, in particular the need to reconsider the current policy of providing additional visits in order to strengthen family relationships.

Originality/value

The unique partnership between the author and the community-based peer researchers illuminates an invaluable perspective when exploring the pilot of Mellow Dads, the findings of which have the potential to challenge the ways in which the fathering role is promoted and fulfilled within the prison system.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Trudie Walters, Raphaela Stadler and Allan Stewart Jepson

The importance of events for marginalised groups has largely been overlooked within tourism, hospitality and event studies. The purpose of this study is to address this…

Abstract

Purpose

The importance of events for marginalised groups has largely been overlooked within tourism, hospitality and event studies. The purpose of this study is to address this gap, emphasising the positive outcomes of power relationships rather than the negative, which have traditionally been the focus in event studies.

Design/methodology/approach

The study investigated eight events for indigenous and ethnic minority groups, rural women, disabled people and seniors in Australia and New Zealand. Qualitative data was collected via participant observation, reflexive ethnography, semi-structured interviews and in-the-moment conversations. An inductive thematic approach was taken to data analysis.

Findings

Eight themes around notions of power and empowerment were identified during the analysis: providing a platform, giving/taking ownership, gaining confidence, empowering with/through knowledge, respect, pride and affirmation, freedom to “be” and resistance. These were then viewed through the lenses of social-structural and psychological empowerment, enabling a deeper understanding of power at/through events.

Research limitations/implications

The paper presents a framework for empowerment that enables event organisers to both understand and deliberately plan for the productive use of power, which can reaffirm important event aims, objectives and values. It can also be used by researchers as a framework through which to identify and assess the contributing elements of empowerment at events and by local government to guide policymaking around events.

Originality/value

This study is the first to highlight best practices for the positive use of power at events that “empowers” marginalised groups. Grounded in empowerment theory, the study offers a new lens to reframe notions of power and provides a theoretical framework that will be of value for both critical event studies researchers, event organisers and policymakers alike.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Girish Prayag and Chris Ryan

This paper aims to report the results of a study into visitor evaluations of interactions with hotel employees in Mauritius. Given that the island's core tourism product…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report the results of a study into visitor evaluations of interactions with hotel employees in Mauritius. Given that the island's core tourism product is based on luxury resorts, tourist‐hotel employee interactions possess a potential for determining satisfactory or unsatisfactory holiday evaluations on the part of visitors.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 103 visitors is interviewed using a semi‐structured guide comprising open‐ended questions. This approach reflects the lived experiences of guests and helps to better assess the role played by nationality when reporting visitor‐staff interactions. Data are analyzed using both thematic analysis and textual analysis software.

Findings

Nationality, ethnicity and languages spoken are found to be factors that determine differences in requirements from hotel staff on the part of tourists. Nationality is the strongest discriminator of these requirements.

Research limitations/implications

As with many examples of qualitative research, the findings are time and place specific. Yet nonetheless, the concepts of personal construct theory permit some generalization.

Practical implications

Resort complex staff and management need to note the differences required by guests of different national groupings, and to appreciate that less than warm responses by some clients are not indicative of dissatisfaction.

Originality/value

The paper distinguishes between guests not only on the basis of nationality and ethnicity, but also languages spoken. No similar study relating to resort complexes in Mauritius has been identified. The study also uses two modes of textual data analysis to support the interpretation offered.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

1 – 6 of 6