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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Hazel Morbey, Jenny Pannell and Robin Means

Older people who are homeless, or at risk of homelessness, have been the ‘forgotten homeless’ in policy debates and service provision. They tend to be less visible and…

Abstract

Older people who are homeless, or at risk of homelessness, have been the ‘forgotten homeless’ in policy debates and service provision. They tend to be less visible and less vocal than other groups, and low priority has been given to the impact of homelessness on their health and well‐being. Through the Older Homelessness Partnership Programme two national charities, The Housing Associations Charitable Trust and Help the Aged, funded seventeen innovative projects throughout the UK to provide services for this user group. The homeless charity Crisis contributed to an evaluation of the Programme. This paper explores the complex and multiple needs of older homeless people, which challenge the popular myth of the older homeless person as an archetypal "tramp" figure.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Jenny Pannell and Guy Palmer

Older people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness have diverse and varied needs. Their needs are not the same as those of either younger homeless people or older…

Abstract

Older people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness have diverse and varied needs. Their needs are not the same as those of either younger homeless people or older people who already have secure and appropriate housing. This article explains the problems and proposes cost‐effective solutions for commissioners and providers.

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

Jenny Pannell and Imogen Blood

This briefing paper was commissioned by Help the Aged to inform a meeting held earlier this year. The recommendations from that meeting are summarised at the end of the…

Abstract

This briefing paper was commissioned by Help the Aged to inform a meeting held earlier this year. The recommendations from that meeting are summarised at the end of the briefing. The paper draws on the following sources: a short survey of national advice, housing and older people's organisations carried out in April 2002, a brief review of previous research reports on older people and housing advice, and a summary of current government and other initiatives relevant to older people and housing advice.

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Karen Kennedy, Jenny Pannell and Neil Summers

Nutrition and exercise matter for everyone, including people with learning disabilities. Poor nutrition and lack of exercise can have adverse effects on emotional and…

Abstract

Nutrition and exercise matter for everyone, including people with learning disabilities. Poor nutrition and lack of exercise can have adverse effects on emotional and physical health and well‐being, which then affect the ability to cope with the demands of everyday life, including independent living and enjoyment of voluntary or paid work, college and leisure activities. Support staff need training and advice to understand this if they are to facilitate optimal quality of life.

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Tina Fear, Nancy Carlton, Frances Heywood, Misa Izuhara, Jenny Pannell and Robin Means

Issues raised here are drawn from the findings of a housing investigation that explored harassment and abuse of older tenants in the private rented sector. The project…

Abstract

Issues raised here are drawn from the findings of a housing investigation that explored harassment and abuse of older tenants in the private rented sector. The project examined older people's experiences and raised important links between health and housing. The article highlights financial abuse directed towards these older people and examines implications for professionals and agencies.

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The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Jenny Pannell

Housing and support are essential if people misusing drugs and alcohol are to address their substance misuse and their other physical, mental and emotional health needs…

Abstract

Housing and support are essential if people misusing drugs and alcohol are to address their substance misuse and their other physical, mental and emotional health needs. If their housing and related support needs are not addressed at each stage of the treatment journey, they are much less likely to enter or remain in treatment. This article outlines the policy context, discusses barriers in service development, explores the role of housing with support for substance users and gives examples of imaginative commissioning and provision. It is based on recent work for the Department of Health Care Services Improvement Partnership.

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Lynn Watson

Abstract

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Abstract

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Abstract

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The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Tammi Walker, Jenny Shaw, Lea Hamilton, Clive Turpin, Catherine Reid and Kathryn Abel

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of prison staff working with imprisoned women who self-harm in English prisons. In this small-scale study, 14…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of prison staff working with imprisoned women who self-harm in English prisons. In this small-scale study, 14 prison staff in three English prisons were interviewed to examine the strategies currently used by them to support imprisoned women who self-harm.

Design/methodology/approach

Thematic analysis (Braun and Clarke, 2006) was used to identify three key themes: “developing a relationship”, “self-help strategies” and “relational interventions”.

Findings

Many staff expressed some dissatisfaction in the techniques available to support the women, and felt their utility can be restricted by the prison regime.

Research limitations/implications

This study suggests that there is currently a deficit in the provision of training and support for prison staff, who are expected to fulfil a dual role as both custodian and carer of imprisoned women. Further research into prison staff’s perception of the training currently available could highlight gaps between current theory and practice in the management of self-harm and thus indicate content for future training programmes. Research exploring the impact of working with imprisoned women who self-harm is suggested to identify strategies for supporting staff. It must be acknowledged that this is a small-scale qualitative study and the findings are from only three prisons and may not apply to staff in other settings.

Originality/value

Currently few studies have focussed on the perspective of prison staff. This study is one of very few studies which focusses on the techniques and resources available to support the women, from the perspective of the prison staff.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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