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Book part
Publication date: 3 August 2011

Jenny M.H. Sok, Rob J. Blomme, Debbie M. Tromp and Jaap J. Van Muijen

The purpose of this research project was to identify success factors in the careers of top women in the hospitality industry. We started out by interviewing five women who…

Abstract

The purpose of this research project was to identify success factors in the careers of top women in the hospitality industry. We started out by interviewing five women who are currently working in a high management position in the hospitality industry, about their experiences on their way to the top. For the purpose of comparison we later on decided to apply theoretical sampling and include women from other industries, and subsequently men from inside and outside the hospitality industry. Grounded Theory analysis revealed six factors that influenced all their rising careers: internal drive, ambition, social skills, competencies, personality, and external factors. Although the factors were of varying importance at different stages of their professional life cycle, “internal drive” and “ambition” were found to be most important throughout the progressing careers. Some differences between the groups studied are described and implications for future research and practice are discussed.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-769-8

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Book part
Publication date: 3 August 2011

Abstract

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-769-8

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Book part
Publication date: 20 September 2014

Carlijne Joosten, Jenny Sok and Robert J. Blomme

Literature and practice show that the integration of feminine characteristics into leadership in the management of hotel organizations is becoming increasingly important…

Abstract

Literature and practice show that the integration of feminine characteristics into leadership in the management of hotel organizations is becoming increasingly important. Although some leading hotel chains claim to further this integration by encouraging women to develop their career paths upwards into the higher management ranks, little research has been conducted into this phenomenon. This is why this study seeks to assess and elaborate the current status of attempts to integrate feminine aspects into leadership within the hotel industry. The qualitative study held among hotel managers demonstrates that the terms ‘masculine’ and ‘feminine’ are confusing. Additionally, when feminine and masculine leadership are considered, these terms are not carefully implemented. Hence, there is a strong need for greater in-depth knowledge and effective training to enhance the successful implementation of feminine and masculine leadership in the hotel industry.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-174-9

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Book part
Publication date: 11 July 2013

Robert J. Blomme, Jenny Sok, Arjan van Rheede and Debbie M. Tromp

The relationship between work and family has long been the subject of lively debate in the political, public, and academic arena. Employers in the hospitality industry…

Abstract

The relationship between work and family has long been the subject of lively debate in the political, public, and academic arena. Employers in the hospitality industry should carefully consider the work–family balance of their employees because maintaining a good balance will result in lower costs, lower sick rates, and lower staff turnover. The term “balance” refers to the way in which work interferes with life at home and how home life interferes with work. It includes both the positive and negative effects that work has on the family domain and vice versa. As research on the psychological contract approach to the employment relationship is scarce with regard to work–family interference, it became the subject of this study. The results demonstrate that psychological contract measures, in particular time commitment, can explain work–family conflict, while job content can explain work–family enrichment. In addition, the study revealed that with the appearance of gender as a moderator, different additional factors may play a role in work–family enrichment and work–family conflict. Furthermore, it revealed that family structure is not a predictor for work–family interference. This paper discusses managerial implications and offers recommendations for further research.

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2018

Jenny Sok, Robert Jan Blomme, Melanie De Ruiter, Debbie Tromp and X.D. Lub

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between home-to-work spillover, measured as positive and negative home–work interference (HWI) and turnover intentions, as…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between home-to-work spillover, measured as positive and negative home–work interference (HWI) and turnover intentions, as well as the mediating role of perceptions concerning training and development practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected among 418 respondents who were working at two business schools. A confirmative structural equation modeling analysis was conducted for the analysis.

Findings

As expected, positive HWI showed negative relationships with turnover intentions, while negative HWI related positively to turnover intentions. Training and development practices mediated the relationship between positive HWI and turnover intentions; the mediation effect was stronger for women than it was for men. Training and development practices did not mediate the relationship between negative HWI and turnover intentions, however.

Practical implications

The outcomes suggest that helping employees to balance their work and home lives can be beneficial for employees, as well as for employers in terms of reducing turnover intentions.

Originality/value

As contributions, additional insight into the relationship between positive and negative non-work factors and turnover intentions by examining the ways in which both positive as well as negative HWI are related to turnover intentions. Furthermore, the research considers the mediating role played by perceptions concerning human resource (HR) practices, and particularly training and development practices as perceived by the employee, in the relationship between positive and negative HWI and turnover intentions.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 42 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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