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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

Jenny Kidd

The purpose of this paper is to highlight and reflect on the increased use of social media in the museums sector in the UK and beyond. It seeks to explore the challenges…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight and reflect on the increased use of social media in the museums sector in the UK and beyond. It seeks to explore the challenges of utilising such media for institutions steeped in discourses of authority, authenticity and materiality.

Design/methodology/approach

Arguments are illustrated using examples of practice and policy from across the museums sector, and are informed by critical theory. In particular, Erving Goffman's frame analysis is used as a means for understanding and articulating the current use of social media by museums.

Findings

There is currently a gulf between the possibilities presented by social media, and their use by many museums. This leads to forms of frame misalignment, which can be intensely problematic. It is crucial that museums increase their understanding of the frames within which such activity is being encouraged and experienced.

Research limitations/implications

The paper does not offer a comprehensive mapping of social media use by museums at the current time. Rather, it uses notable examples to foreground a number of concerns for exploration through further research.

Originality/value

The paper calls into question the naturalised discourse surrounding social media use in the museums sector. It calls for a re‐appraisal and re‐framing of such activity so that it might more genuinely and satisfactorily match the claims that are being made for and about it.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Book part
Publication date: 12 August 2017

Jenny L. Davis and Tony P. Love

Role-taking, perspective taking, and empathy have developed through parallel literatures in sociology and psychology. All three concepts address the ways that people…

Abstract

Purpose

Role-taking, perspective taking, and empathy have developed through parallel literatures in sociology and psychology. All three concepts address the ways that people attune the self to others’ thoughts and feelings. Despite conceptual and operational overlap, researchers have yet to synthesize existing research across the three concepts. We undertake the task of theoretical synthesis, constructing a model in which role-taking emerges as a multidimensional process that includes perspective taking and empathy as component parts.

Approach

We review the literatures on role-taking, perspective taking, and empathy across disciplines. Focusing on definitions, measures, and interventions, we discern how the concepts overlap, how they are distinct, and how they work together in theoretically meaningful ways.

Findings

The review identifies two key axes on which each concept varies: the relative roles of affect and cognition, and the relative emphasis on self and structure. The review highlights the cognitive nature of perspective taking, the affective nature of empathy, and the structural nature of role-taking. In a move toward theoretical synthesis, we propose a definition that centers role-taking as a sociological construct, with perspective taking and empathy representing cognition and affect, respectively.

Social implications

Role-taking is an important part of selfhood and community social life. It is a skill that varies in patterned ways, including along lines of status and power. Theoretical synthesis clarifies the process of role-taking and fosters the construction of effective interventions aimed at equalizing role-taking in interpersonal interaction.

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-192-8

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Sally Brown

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the experiences of conducting focus groups amongst acquaintances in naturally occurring settings, where participants were known…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the experiences of conducting focus groups amongst acquaintances in naturally occurring settings, where participants were known to each other and participation was less about being recruited, and more about being there when the focus group took place.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a qualitative study of multi-generational experiences of teenage parenting, and used interviews and focus groups. The study took an ethnographic approach, using case studies with a small number (4) of families, plus supplementary interviews, and focus groups with teenage parents and parents-to-be.

Findings

Using focus groups in naturally occurring settings alongside other qualitative data collection affords insights into the research topic that would not otherwise be available.

Originality/value

The paper discusses the challenges and benefits of using naturally occurring groups, and reflects on the way the findings from these groups illuminated aspects of the study concerning relationships. It argues that naturally occurring groups have advantages over conventionally organised focus groups that contribute to a deeper understanding of relationships between members.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 11 July 2013

Robert J. Blomme, Jenny Sok, Arjan van Rheede and Debbie M. Tromp

The relationship between work and family has long been the subject of lively debate in the political, public, and academic arena. Employers in the hospitality industry…

Abstract

The relationship between work and family has long been the subject of lively debate in the political, public, and academic arena. Employers in the hospitality industry should carefully consider the work–family balance of their employees because maintaining a good balance will result in lower costs, lower sick rates, and lower staff turnover. The term “balance” refers to the way in which work interferes with life at home and how home life interferes with work. It includes both the positive and negative effects that work has on the family domain and vice versa. As research on the psychological contract approach to the employment relationship is scarce with regard to work–family interference, it became the subject of this study. The results demonstrate that psychological contract measures, in particular time commitment, can explain work–family conflict, while job content can explain work–family enrichment. In addition, the study revealed that with the appearance of gender as a moderator, different additional factors may play a role in work–family enrichment and work–family conflict. Furthermore, it revealed that family structure is not a predictor for work–family interference. This paper discusses managerial implications and offers recommendations for further research.

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1966

James Kidd

THIS DOES NOT PURPORT TO BE an apologia for the old guard‐book style name‐catalogue, but, forgetting mere canons of stream‐lined efficiency, let us admit that there is…

Abstract

THIS DOES NOT PURPORT TO BE an apologia for the old guard‐book style name‐catalogue, but, forgetting mere canons of stream‐lined efficiency, let us admit that there is some character, some romantic appeal about it that a card catalogue cannot rival. Cards just haven't got personality or colour: they are unitary and strictly functional, a jumble of unconnected parts without a common link to make them a homogeneous entity. The guard‐book catalogue, for all its problems of maintenance and often cumbersome inefficiency, does, I contend, make life more interesting for the cataloguer—and the imaginative user.

Details

Library Review, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2013

Annamarie C. Klose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the Spring 2013 MARAC Conference.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the Spring 2013 MARAC Conference.

Design/methodology/approach

This report focuses on the use of technology in archives, libraries, and museums, as presented in various sessions at the Spring 2013 MARAC Conference.

Findings

Archives, libraries, and museums are utilizing various technologies including QR codes, data visualization, open‐source platforms, and single search boxes to better reach and serve the demands and expectations of today's users.

Originality/value

The paper condenses the author's notes from various sessions.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 December 2020

Melanie Randle and Nadia Zainuddin

Governments are increasingly marketising human services in developed countries, with the aim of giving individuals more choice and control over the support they receive…

Abstract

Purpose

Governments are increasingly marketising human services in developed countries, with the aim of giving individuals more choice and control over the support they receive. Marketisation effectively transforms “clients” into “consumers” who are exposed to competitive market conditions and the marketing strategies of service organisations. However, the heterogeneity amongst citizens leaves some segments of populations more vulnerable within marketised systems. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of the marketisation of human services on the value delivered to consumers of disability services. Given that the nature of disabilities can vary greatly, the study also examines the impact of the degree of disability on value creation and destruction for disability service consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative, individual-depth interviews were conducted with 35 participants: 17 were consumers of disability services (either because they have a disability or care for someone who does) and 18 were disability service providers (for example, managers of disability programmes).

Findings

Factors that influence value creation and destruction include quality and turnover of staff, organisation and communication of service providers, ability to advocate effectively, level of funding and accessibility of services. Heterogeneity amongst consumers is also identified as a key factor affecting the creation and destruction of value.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to apply marketing techniques, such as market segmentation, to identify heterogeneity in relation to value creation and value destruction in the context of human services. It also considers the notion of consumer vulnerability, stemming from disability, as an important lens through which the outcomes of marketised human service systems can be evaluated.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

T. Kwikkers, J. Lantaires, R.B. Turnbull, H.T. Law, Barry George and Dave Savage

On 20 April ISHM‐Benelux held its 1988 Spring meeting at the Grand Hotel Heerlen. This meeting was totally devoted to implantable devices, in particular to the…

Abstract

On 20 April ISHM‐Benelux held its 1988 Spring meeting at the Grand Hotel Heerlen. This meeting was totally devoted to implantable devices, in particular to the technologies used for these high reliability, extremely demanding devices. For this meeting ISHM‐Benelux was the guest of the Kerkrade facility of Medtronic. Medtronic (headquartered in Minneapolis, USA) is the world's leading manufacturer of implantable electronic devices. Apart from the assembly of pacemakers and heart‐wires, the Kerkrade facility acts as a manufacturing technology centre for Medtronic's European facilities.

Details

Microelectronics International, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-5362

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Declan Dunne, Nikhil Lal, Nagarajan Pranesh, Michael Spry, Christopher Mcfaul and Paul Rooney

A clinical audit is a key component of the clinical governance framework. The rate of audit completion in general surgery has not been investigated. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

A clinical audit is a key component of the clinical governance framework. The rate of audit completion in general surgery has not been investigated. The purpose of this paper is to assess the rates of audit activity and completion and explore the barriers to successful audit completion.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a multi-centre study evaluating current surgical audit practice. A standardised audit proforma was designed. All clinical audits in general surgery during a two-year period were identified and retrospectively reviewed. Data held by the audit departments were collated, and individual audit teams were contacted to verify the data accuracy. Audit teams failing to complete the full audit cycle with a re-audit were asked to explain the underlying reasons behind this.

Findings

Of the six trusts approached, two refused to participate, and one failed to initiate the project. A total of 39 audits were registered across three surgical directorates. Only 15 out of 39 audits completed at least one audit cycle, with 4 deemed of no value to re-audit. Only seven audits were completed to re-audit. Achieving a publication or a presentation was the most cited reason for not completing the audit loop.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates that the poor rates of audit completion rate found in other areas of clinical medicine pervade general surgery. Improved completion of an audit is essential and strategies to achieve this are urgently needed.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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