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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Holly Blake, Basharat Hussain, Jenny Hand, David Rowlands, Amdani Juma and Catrin Evans

There is a need to increase access to HIV testing in the UK in male migrant communities. The purpose of this paper is to assess the uptake and acceptability of a workplace…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a need to increase access to HIV testing in the UK in male migrant communities. The purpose of this paper is to assess the uptake and acceptability of a workplace HIV testing intervention aimed at increasing access to testing in non-clinical settings.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 20 health check events were delivered at 11 UK organisations employing male migrant workers. Intervention included HIV testing, cholesterol, BMI, blood glucose, blood pressure; tailored health advice; take-away resources; optional post-event text reminders about HIV and general health. Mixed-methods evaluation included exit questionnaires (n=771), follow-up text messages (n=465) and qualitative interviews (n=35) to assess event acceptability. Qualitative data were analysed thematically.

Findings

Attendees were 776 employees from 50 countries (51 per cent male; 30 per cent migrant workers). A total of 52 per cent of attendees undertook an HIV test (75 per cent were first-time testers). In total, 96 per cent considered HIV testing to be an acceptable element of workplace health checks; 79 per cent reported new health-related knowledge; 60 per cent of attendees opted for follow-up text messaging; 26 per cent of text respondents reported independently taking HIV test post-event. High acceptability and uptake of HIV testing was associated with convenience, opportunity taking (through removal of deliberation and intentional test-seeking), and normalisation of HIV testing within a general health check.

Originality/value

This study is the first to demonstrate that opt-in HIV testing can be successfully delivered in the workplace within a multi-component health check. The workplace is an effective means of increasing access to HIV testing in groups at risk for HIV, including male migrant workers.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2012

Amanda Bateman

Purpose – This chapter demonstrates the social organization practices evident in early childhood disputes in order to promote a greater understanding of the role of…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter demonstrates the social organization practices evident in early childhood disputes in order to promote a greater understanding of the role of non-verbal, embodied actions within the dispute process. In doing so, this chapter offers insight into children's co-construction of disputes and has practical implications for early childhood teachers.

Methodology – Ethnomethodology (EM), conversation analysis (CA) and membership categorization analysis (MCA) are applied to the current study of children's disputes in order to offer insight into the sequences of social organization processes evident in children's disagreements.

Findings – This chapter presents a detailed analysis of the everyday disputes which four-year-old children engage in during their morning playtime at a primary school in Wales, UK. It reveals the children's use of physical gestures to support their verbal actions in order to maximize intersubjectivity between the participants. This joint understanding was necessary during the social organization process.

Practical implications – Managing children's physical disputes within an educational context is recognized as a very difficult aspect of a teacher's routine as the timing and level of intervention are so subjective (Bateman, 2011a). This chapter offers insight into the organization of physical disputes between young children, and so enables teachers to make an informed decision in their practice.

Details

Disputes in Everyday Life: Social and Moral Orders of Children and Young People
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-877-9

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Abstract

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The Catalyst Effect
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-551-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1993

Donald C. Wellington

Remarks on the parallel in the basis of the riches of thearistocracy and plutocracy. Illustrates the argument from the history ofthe development of the cotton textile…

Abstract

Remarks on the parallel in the basis of the riches of the aristocracy and plutocracy. Illustrates the argument from the history of the development of the cotton textile industry, the underpinnings for its growth being the inventions prior to and during the eighteenth century. Exemplifies the part of inventions as the begetter of plutocratic wealth. Sir Richard Arkwright, notably, was its salacious issue.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 20 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Lifeng Yang, Scott Vitell and Victoria D. Bush

In this research, the authors aim to identify a situation when a consumer’s judgment of unethical behavior is not consistent with their intention to act ethically.

Abstract

Purpose

In this research, the authors aim to identify a situation when a consumer’s judgment of unethical behavior is not consistent with their intention to act ethically.

Design/methodology/approach

Across two studies, participants were asked to evaluate how ethical an actor’s behavior was when the actor knowingly kept surplus change from a distracted cashier. The identity of the actor was manipulated to be of either high or low similarity to the participants. The business where the distracted cashier worked for was described as either locally owned or a chain. Participant’s intended action in similar situation was assessed after their evaluation of how ethical/unethical the actor’s behavior was.

Findings

While participants generally find the actor’s behavior to be unethical, identity overlap between the participant and the actor is found to moderate how likely one is to emulate the actor’s behavior in a similar situation. Identity overlap is found to positively predict one’s likelihood to act like the actor in the scenarios. Whether the business was locally owned or a chain was not found to affect one’s ethical judgment or ethical intention.

Research limitations/implications

Identity overlap is found to positively predict one’s likelihood to act like the actor in the scenarios.

Practical implications

Whether the business was locally owned or a chain was not found to affect one’s ethical judgment nor ethical intention. While participants in general do show that they judge the actor’s behavior as unethical, identity overlap between the participant and the actor moderates how likely one is to act like the actor if put in the same scenario.

Social implications

The research suggests that consumers are more likely to act unethically when they identify with “similar” others, regardless of how unethical they consider that behavior to be.

Originality/value

This research suggests that even when consumers acknowledge that certain behavior against a business is unethical, their intention to engage in the unethical behavior may not be predicted by their judgment of how unethical the behavior is. Instead, consumers are likely to emulate unethical behavior of those whom they consider similar to themselves, regardless of how unethical they judge that behavior to be.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Book part
Publication date: 22 April 2003

Lawrence Angus, Ilana Snyder and Wendy Sutherland-Smith

This chapter reports research conducted in Melbourne, Australia that is focused on the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in schools and families…

Abstract

This chapter reports research conducted in Melbourne, Australia that is focused on the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in schools and families. The emphasis is on the relationship between technology, learning, culture and (dis)advantage. It is generally agreed that ICTs are associated with major social, cultural, pedagogical and lifestyle changes, although the nature of those changes is subject to conflicting norms and interpretations. In this chapter we adopt a critical, multi-disciplined, relational perspective in order to examine the influence of ICTs, in schools and homes, on a sample of students and their families.

Details

Investigating Educational Policy Through Ethnography
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-018-0

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Book part
Publication date: 11 July 2006

Anne M. Velliquette, Jeff B. Murray and Deborah J. Evers

In order to emphasize in-depth analyses of individual life stories, seven informants were selected. Since breadth of experience will contribute to a more detailed…

Abstract

In order to emphasize in-depth analyses of individual life stories, seven informants were selected. Since breadth of experience will contribute to a more detailed contextualization of the consumer's use of products in identity negotiation, diversity across informants was emphasized. Interviews generally followed the format as suggested by Thompson, Locander, and Pollio (1989). A comfortable setting was chosen and pseudonyms were used to ensure anonymity. Interviews were audio-taped and lasted anywhere from one to just over two hours. Grand tour questions (McCracken, 1988) focused on the meaning of the tattoo design, the experience of being tattooed, perceptions of the body, words the informants used to describe themselves, and other biographical information important for understanding the informant's personal myth. Every effort was made to present a natural front, keep the informant on track without being too directive, demonstrate active listening, and prompt the informant as a way of probing for details (Spradley, 1979). To ensure accuracy, an experienced and trained transcriptionist transcribed each of the seven interviews. The final text totaled 450 typed double-spaced pages.

Details

Research in Consumer Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 0-7623-1304-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Bronwyn Houldsworth, John O’Brien, Jim Butler and John Edwards

Workplace restructuring implies people changing roles, leading to the deskilling of people who must learn their way back to competence. Reports the case of a person…

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Abstract

Workplace restructuring implies people changing roles, leading to the deskilling of people who must learn their way back to competence. Reports the case of a person learning in a new role. The conceptual framework for the analysis is the Dreyfus model of skill development. Shows the model to be effective both for research and for individuals to understand their own development. The results enrich the understanding of workplace learning, in particular the manner in which people can be helped to learn a new role.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Book part
Publication date: 27 October 2021

Mengxi Pang

Abstract

Details

Family, Identity and Mixedness
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-735-5

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Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Martin Cathcart Frödén

Abstract

Details

A Circular Argument
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-385-7

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