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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Susan Lafferty and Jenny Edwards

Christensen's Theory of Disruptive Technologies predicts that mainstream organisations and industries can be made obsolete by new technologies that change the whole…

Abstract

Christensen's Theory of Disruptive Technologies predicts that mainstream organisations and industries can be made obsolete by new technologies that change the whole paradigm of the industries in which they operate. This paper demonstrates the relevance of the theory of disruptive technologies to academic libraries, higher education and the academic publishing industry. The way universities are organised and how they operate could change radically; scholarly communication could be transformed, placing academic publishers at risk; academic libraries may become irrelevant as new business models emerge. There are strategies that these organisations might adopt to limit the effect of such technologies and/or preferably transform them into sustaining technologies.

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Library Management, vol. 25 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2007

Lucy Asquith and Bernadette Scott

This paper summarises the roundtable discussions convened by the charity Carr‐Gomm in October 2007. Participants included providers of services to vulnerable people…

Abstract

This paper summarises the roundtable discussions convened by the charity Carr‐Gomm in October 2007. Participants included providers of services to vulnerable people, policy makers and academics, creating a useful mixture of theoretical and practical knowledge. The Social Exclusion Task Force report in 2006 gives a clear indication of the picture of unemployment for vulnerable people. In addition, developments in funding for key government departments, coupled with population projections, suggests that there is a strong external impetus for vulnerable people to be employed. Discussions covered a range of topics including Who benefits when vulnerable people work?, What constitutes good work? and Barriers to supporting vulnerable people into work.Overall, the group concluded that the most urgent priority is for third sector employers themselves to create flexible work opportunities which can be taken up by vulnerable people. This experience should then be used to disseminate learning and to make the case for change with other employers.

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Afzal S. Siddiqui, Emily S. Bartholomew, Chris Marnay and Shmuel S. Oren

The physical nature of electricity generation and delivery creates special problems for the design of efficient markets, notably the need to manage delivery in real time…

Abstract

The physical nature of electricity generation and delivery creates special problems for the design of efficient markets, notably the need to manage delivery in real time and the volatile congestion and associated costs that result. Proposals for the operation of the deregulated electricity industry tend towards one of two paradigms: centralized and decentralized. Transmission congestion management can be implemented in the more centralized point‐to‐point approach, as in New York state, where derivative transmission congestion contracts (TCCs) are traded, or in the more decentralized flowgate‐based approach. While it is widely accepted that theoretically TCCs have attractive properties as hedging instruments against congestion cost uncertainty, whether efficient markets for them can be established in practice has been questioned. Based on an empirical analysis of publicly available data from years 2000 and 2001, it appears that New York TCCs provided market participants with a potentially effective hedge against volatile congestion rents. However, the prices paid for TCCs systematically diverged from the resulting congestion rents for distant locations and at high prices. The price paid for the hedge not being in line with the congestion rents, i.e., unreasonably high risk premiums are being paid, suggests an inefficient market. The low liquidity of TCC markets and the deviation of TCC feasibility requirements from actual energy flows are possible explanations.

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Managerial Finance, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1948

Of the kinds of food I have mentioned, I wish to deal in more detail with two of our staple items of food, milk and meat.

Abstract

Of the kinds of food I have mentioned, I wish to deal in more detail with two of our staple items of food, milk and meat.

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British Food Journal, vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Bronwyn Houldsworth, John O’Brien, Jim Butler and John Edwards

Workplace restructuring implies people changing roles, leading to the deskilling of people who must learn their way back to competence. Reports the case of a person…

Abstract

Workplace restructuring implies people changing roles, leading to the deskilling of people who must learn their way back to competence. Reports the case of a person learning in a new role. The conceptual framework for the analysis is the Dreyfus model of skill development. Shows the model to be effective both for research and for individuals to understand their own development. The results enrich the understanding of workplace learning, in particular the manner in which people can be helped to learn a new role.

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Education + Training, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1993

Donald C. Wellington

Remarks on the parallel in the basis of the riches of thearistocracy and plutocracy. Illustrates the argument from the history ofthe development of the cotton textile…

Abstract

Remarks on the parallel in the basis of the riches of the aristocracy and plutocracy. Illustrates the argument from the history of the development of the cotton textile industry, the underpinnings for its growth being the inventions prior to and during the eighteenth century. Exemplifies the part of inventions as the begetter of plutocratic wealth. Sir Richard Arkwright, notably, was its salacious issue.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 20 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Abstract

Many jurisdictions fine illegal cartels using penalty guidelines that presume an arbitrary 10% overcharge. This article surveys more than 700 published economic studies and judicial decisions that contain 2,041 quantitative estimates of overcharges of hard-core cartels. The primary findings are: (1) the median average long-run overcharge for all types of cartels over all time periods is 23.0%; (2) the mean average is at least 49%; (3) overcharges reached their zenith in 1891–1945 and have trended downward ever since; (4) 6% of the cartel episodes are zero; (5) median overcharges of international-membership cartels are 38% higher than those of domestic cartels; (6) convicted cartels are on average 19% more effective at raising prices as unpunished cartels; (7) bid-rigging conduct displays 25% lower markups than price-fixing cartels; (8) contemporary cartels targeted by class actions have higher overcharges; and (9) when cartels operate at peak effectiveness, price changes are 60–80% higher than the whole episode. Historical penalty guidelines aimed at optimally deterring cartels are likely to be too low.

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The Law and Economics of Class Actions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-951-5

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Jenny Lynne Semenza, Regina Koury and Sandra Shropshire

This paper aims to provide an annotated bibliography of literature on diversity initiatives for 2010-2015 in academic libraries, both in USA and internationally. It aims…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an annotated bibliography of literature on diversity initiatives for 2010-2015 in academic libraries, both in USA and internationally. It aims to help librarians interested in fostering a welcoming and supporting environment for all individuals and engaging library community in discussions about diversity.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted literature review using EBSCOhost multidisciplinary databases and Google Scholar, using the terms “divers*” and “academic librar*” and limiting search results to 2010-2015 dates.

Findings

The literature reviewed in this annotated bibliography is a solid start to assist librarians with diversity initiatives from planning collections to wider organization planning purposes.

Originality/value

No other annotated bibliography currently exists for those interested in conducting vital work of ensuring a respectful and inclusive library environment.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2011

Jeffrey A. Edwards and Jennis J. Biser

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the level of influence that civil liberties has on the marginal effect of remittances on gross domestic investment and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the level of influence that civil liberties has on the marginal effect of remittances on gross domestic investment and consumption separately and measures it across all levels of civil liberties.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employ a two‐stage system generalized method of moments procedure and the civil liberties subset of the Freedom in the World Index as a proxy for civil liberty.

Findings

The findings indicate a substitution effect from investment to consumption as civil liberties deteriorate for developing south economies, though not for emerging economies. In addition, the marginal effect of remittances on investment diminishes less quickly as economies become less free than it increases for consumption indicating that the substitution is not quite one‐for‐one.

Practical implications

Economies with low levels of civil liberties could benefit by improving them in ways that would encourage recipients to channel remittances into investment rather than consumption.

Originality/value

This paper differs from previous research in that the authors evaluate investment and consumption separately rather than embedding these component parts within growth. In addition, when interactions are employed in existing literature, the inference drawn is static with regard to the varying degrees of institutional development. Third, none of the prior studies directly explores civil liberties proper; they usually aggregate civil liberties with other aspects of political or economic freedom.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Lesley K. Holdsworth, Valerie A. Blair and Jenny Miller

Physiotherapists throughout the UK have a professional obligation to keep up to date and practice effectively. The Scottish Physiotherapists Clinical Effectiveness Network…

Abstract

Purpose

Physiotherapists throughout the UK have a professional obligation to keep up to date and practice effectively. The Scottish Physiotherapists Clinical Effectiveness Network (SPCEN) was established in 1999 with the aim of providing a mechanism through which physiotherapists could share and learn from experiences, avoid duplication of effort and undertake proactive activities. The purpose of this paper is to report on the experience of the SPCEN and provide an evaluation of the impact the network has made on the clinical effectiveness activities of physiotherapists throughout Scotland.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was distributed to 2,118 physiotherapists across Scotland (response rate of 54.5 per cent). It aimed to determine the level of clinical effectiveness activity, the confidence of physiotherapists in engaging in these activities and the extent of involvement with clinical guideline implementation.

Findings

Results were analysed in two groups. Group 1 consisted of those that reported that they did participate in network activities (40 per cent n=330) and Group 2, those who did not (60 per cent n=686). Participants were significantly more engaged in undertaking a range of clinical effectiveness activities than non‐participants (p<0.0001), had greater confidence in their own ability to engage and were involved in the implementation of clinical guidelines to a greater extent (p<0.0001).

Practical implications

Establishing the SPCEN has resulted in more confident physiotherapists who are engaging in greater levels of clinical effectiveness activity throughout Scotland.

Originality/value

This paper provides the reader with an indication of the value networks can achieve.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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