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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Jenny Darroch

To provide important empirical evidence to support the role of knowledge management within firms.

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30038

Abstract

Purpose

To provide important empirical evidence to support the role of knowledge management within firms.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a mail survey sent to CEOs representing firms with 50 or more employees from a cross‐section of industries. A total of 1,743 surveys were mailed out and 443 were returned and usable (27.8 percent response rate). The sample was checked for response and non‐response bias. Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modelling.

Findings

This paper presents knowledge management as a coordinating mechanism. Empirical evidence supports the view that a firm with a knowledge management capability will use resources more efficiently and so will be more innovative and perform better.

Research limitations/implications

The sample slightly over‐represented larger firms. Data were also collected in New Zealand. As with most studies, it is important to replicate this study in different contexts.

Practical implications

Knowledge management is embraced in many organizations and requires a business case to justify expenditure on programs to implement knowledge management behaviours and practices or hardware and software solutions. This paper provides support for the importance of knowledge management to enhance innovation and performance.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to find empirical support for the role of knowledge management within firms. Further, the positioning of knowledge management as a coordinating mechanism is also an important contribution to our thinking on this topic.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Jenny Darroch and Rod McNaughton

Knowledge is seen as a critical resource, with both tangible and intangible attributes. Effective knowledge management is emerging as an important concept that enables all…

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3341

Abstract

Knowledge is seen as a critical resource, with both tangible and intangible attributes. Effective knowledge management is emerging as an important concept that enables all the resources of firms, including knowledge, to be used effectively. A knowledge‐management orientation is positioned in this paper as a distinctive capability that supports the creation of sustainable competitive advantages such as innovation. Using an instrument to measure a knowledge‐management orientation, which is grounded in Kohli, Jaworski and Kumar's work on a market orientation, this paper identifies four clusters of firms based on knowledge‐management practices that exist within the New Zealand business environment. The clusters are then described according to their innovation and financial performance profiles. The study finds that firms with a knowledge‐management orientation outperformed those classified as market‐oriented. The study also shows a market orientation to be a subset of a knowledge‐management orientation.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 37 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Jenny Darroch and Rod McNaughton

The management of knowledge is frequently identified as an important antecedent of innovation. However, very little empirical research has specifically addressed…

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15557

Abstract

The management of knowledge is frequently identified as an important antecedent of innovation. However, very little empirical research has specifically addressed antecedents and consequences of effective knowledge management. Using data collected from 443 New Zealand firms, a knowledge management instrument, which comprises three components and 16 factors, is regressed against a three‐factor innovation scale that captures incremental innovation, innovation that changes consumers’ behaviour and innovation that destroys existing competencies. The results of this research show that knowledge acquisition and responsiveness to knowledge are more important for innovation than knowledge dissemination.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1998

Sigrun Steinhagen, Jenny Darroch and Bill Bailey

The wine industry is typical of many other horticultural industries in that it faces tremendous uncertainty, due to long lag phases between the initial planting…

Abstract

The wine industry is typical of many other horticultural industries in that it faces tremendous uncertainty, due to long lag phases between the initial planting, harvesting, bottling and sales, and seasonal variation between years. As a consequence, marketers face constant challenges when matching supply with demand. While much literature exists on forecasting, forecasting within the wine industry has not yet been documented. An exploratory study of 11 New Zealand wineries, using in‐depth semi‐structured personal interviews, was carried out to develop an understanding of the forecasting and planning processes followed by the wineries. Results were varied, at times confirming existing literature on forecasting and at times contradicting it. The results of this study suggest that wineries use more sophisticated short and long term forecasting methods. In addition, viticulturists become more involved in the forecasting process.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Morgan P. Miles and Jenny Darroch

The paper aims to explore how large firms might leverage entrepreneurial marketing processes to gain and renew competitive advantage.

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7764

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore how large firms might leverage entrepreneurial marketing processes to gain and renew competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper applies past research on entrepreneurial marketing and entrepreneurship with examples from a long‐term case study of firms in New Zealand, Sweden, the UK, and the USA to illustrate how entrepreneurial marketing processes can be strategically employed by large firms to create or discover, assess, and exploit entrepreneurial opportunities more effectively and efficiently.

Findings

The paper offers insight into how large firms leverage entrepreneurial marketing processes to gain advantage. The findings suggest that, in free and open markets, entrepreneurial marketing processes can be strategically employed to create superior value for the firm's customers and owners.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the work of both academics working at the marketing/entrepreneurship interface and executives seeking to leverage marketing to create competitive advantage.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 40 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2008

Chickery J. Kasouf, Jenny Darroch, Claes M. Hultman and Morgan P. Miles

This paper aims to explore the implications of service dominant logic (SDL) on the marketing/entrepreneurship interface.

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1440

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the implications of service dominant logic (SDL) on the marketing/entrepreneurship interface.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper integrates research from co‐creation and service dominant logic with entrepreneurship to explore the value of SDL for entrepreneurial marketing organizations.

Findings

This paper offers insights on: the implications of SDL for entrepreneurship; the value of co‐creation in an entrepreneurial context; and an exploration of risk and co‐creation, mass customization, and scale production in an entrepreneurial marketing context.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the work of both academics and executives attempting to better understand the concepts of SDL and co‐creation and how they might be leveraged to create advantage. In addition, a set of research implications is offered pertaining to co‐creation and SDL in an entrepreneurial marketing context.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2007

Morgan P. Miles, W.W. Kirkley and Jenny Darroch

Much of the information for this case was taken from interviews by the first and second authors with Cindy and John Buell at Mexicali Fresh, taken directly from the…

Abstract

Much of the information for this case was taken from interviews by the first and second authors with Cindy and John Buell at Mexicali Fresh, taken directly from the Buell’s Mexicali Fresh Business Plan, and updated information from their blog posted on http://mexigrill.blogspot.com. In addition, background for this case was provided by Stowers (2005).

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Jenny Darroch

Knowledge management has recently emerged as a new discipline and is generating considerable interest among academics and managers. Given its newness, there is still…

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7821

Abstract

Knowledge management has recently emerged as a new discipline and is generating considerable interest among academics and managers. Given its newness, there is still little guidance in the extant literature on how to measure knowledge management. This paper presents the first scale developed to measure knowledge management behaviors and practices and in so doing provides construct boundaries that should enable the development of a theory of knowledge management (Zaltman et al., 1973).

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Art Thomas, Jenny Darroch and Wendy Galvin

Steeped in tradition, the New Zealand Law Society began removing restrictions on marketing law firms about 12 years ago, with virtually all restrictions dismantled by…

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1322

Abstract

Steeped in tradition, the New Zealand Law Society began removing restrictions on marketing law firms about 12 years ago, with virtually all restrictions dismantled by 1994. As a result, legal firms are now free to use a variety of marketing tools, although some are more diligent and inventive than others. The purpose of the study was to explore the forms of marketing communications being used by legal practices and to identify the type of firm more likely to be communicating with existing and non clients. The results indicate that most firms focus primarily on technical quality (the job, the work required), rather than services quality (the experience, the feeling).

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Philip J. Kitchen and Jagdish N. Sheth

The purpose of this paper is to consider the development and application of marketing theory and practice over time and its current status. The terms “brickbats” and…

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2028

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the development and application of marketing theory and practice over time and its current status. The terms “brickbats” and “bouquets” are used as metaphors to extend praise or criticism for marketing. In doing so, the authors draw upon the views of leading theorists over time and apply these in the current environmental context.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach adopted is discursive, critical and conceptual.

Findings

Following literature review, and drawing upon current examples, marketing as a discipline is subject to both kudos and criticisms. Nonetheless, it is concluded optimistically in that marketing can be an even greater source for societal good. That “goodness” is partly based upon the added impetus of social media adoption and use by consumers, the need for growth and accelerative innovation in the digital age coupled with the democratisation of consumption. Nonetheless, the authors offer the caveat that free competitive markets lead to market failures, and the need for market regulation by governments is becoming more evident.

Research limitations/implications

The implications of the paper are profound. Academics should be concerned in and involved with marketing theory. Questions need to be raised concerning non-robust definitions of marketing and its application. The authors wait for a consumer-led approach to marketing to add depth to the marketing theory.

Practical implications

Marketers need to be made more accountable for their actions. Consumers need to become part of the marketing process. Marketing claims need to be verified by delivered benefits. Companies need to take steps to ensure that the marketing process does not end at purchase. Satisfaction needs to be made manifest. Likewise, dissatisfactions need to be managed well as part of the marketing process.

Social implications

Too much marketing currently is relatively unregulated in the sense that there are so few opportunities to evade its myriad reach and – despite social media – little chance of changing marketing practice for the good of societies. Many criticisms of marketing practice are not being addressed in the literature.

Originality/value

Marketing is a vibrant force in all nations and markets. It is deeply rooted in business practice. It is contemporaneous and relevant. It is global and national. But, it is not entirely all good news. There are caveats and criticisms as well as kudos and praise. While both are addressed here, the topic needs to be considered for marketing and its accompanying theory and practice to change.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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