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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Christine Ratnam and Jennifer Sansom

Considers the area of repatriation/reassignment of employees after international assignments and the effect that it may have on the successful internationalization of…

Abstract

Considers the area of repatriation/reassignment of employees after international assignments and the effect that it may have on the successful internationalization of organizations. By specifically highlighting experiences in this area, suggests that organizations may need to develop their international human resources policies further if they are to maximize workforce investment in globalization. Draws on recent research conducted (via survey and interview) with over 40 companies, together with other relevant research and the personal and professional experiences of the writers. Specifically focuses on the main organizational issues raised and, in particular, effects of disregarding repatriation, effects on strategic and organizational development, lessons to be learned for globalization and the need for a fully integrated HR approach.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2018

Michelle Annette Meyer, Marccus Hendricks, Galen D. Newman, Jaimie Hicks Masterson, John T. Cooper, Garett Sansom, Nasir Gharaibeh, Jennifer Horney, Philip Berke, Shannon van Zandt and Tiffany Cousins

Participatory action research can improve scientific knowledge and community capacity to address disaster resilience and environmental justice. Evidence from the…

Abstract

Purpose

Participatory action research can improve scientific knowledge and community capacity to address disaster resilience and environmental justice. Evidence from the literature suggests that resident participation enhances assessment of environmental risks, raises awareness and empowers residents to fight for equitable distribution of hazard and climate risk adaptations. Yet, risk assessment and urban planning processes still frequently operate within expertise-driven groups without significant community engagement. Such fragmentation results in part from a lack of appreciation for community expertise in built environment adaptations and educational tools to support resident involvement in the often technical built environment planning processes.

Design/methodology/approach

A participatory research and place-based education project was developed that enhanced co-learning between residents and researchers while collecting and analyzing local data on flood resilience in the built environment. Five research activities constitute the curriculum of resilience education on stormwater infrastructure: establishment of partnership agreement/memorandum of understanding, participatory GIS to identify flooding issues, water quality testing and health survey, stormwater infrastructure assessment and urban/landscape design. Partners included high school and college students, residents and environmental justice organizations.

Findings

Outcomes include a stakeholder-approved infrastructure assessment smartphone application, neighborhood maps of drainage issues, a report of water containments and neighborhood-scaled green infrastructure provisions and growth plans. Findings indicate that participatory research positively contributed to resilience knowledge of participants.

Originality/value

This paper outlines an interdisciplinary pedagogical strategy for resilience planning that engages residents to assess and monitor the performance of stormwater infrastructure and create resilience plans. The paper also discusses challenges and opportunities for similar participatory projects.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 9 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 6 July 2021

Abstract

Details

Four Dead in Ohio
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-807-4

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Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2012

Jennifer Arney and Rose Weitz

This chapter explores how direct-to-consumer advertisements (DTCA) for major depression and anxiety disorders use contemporary gender scripts to sell medications and…

Abstract

This chapter explores how direct-to-consumer advertisements (DTCA) for major depression and anxiety disorders use contemporary gender scripts to sell medications and disease definitions to consumers, and in the process reflect and reinforce those scripts for both men and women. Between 1997 and 2006, antidepressant DTCA in popular magazines overwhelmingly depicted depression as a (white) female disorder, as did anti-anxiety DTCA, although not to such an extreme extent. In addition, DTCA often alerted men to the benefits they might reap if the women in their lives sought treatment, while suggesting that women had a responsibility to seek such treatment for the sake of their loved ones. Moreover, DTCA disproportionately encouraged women to monitor their emotions while encouraging men to monitor their physical sensations. Finally, DTCA suggested that medication would yield benefits for women primarily in their close relationships and for men primarily in their work lives, thus reinforcing the binary sex divisions implicit in hegemonic masculinity and emphasized femininity. At a broader level, DTCA studied for this article suggest to both women and men that individuals should monitor themselves and others for a wide variety of common emotions, behaviors, and physical sensations, thus individualizing social problems and encouraging the expansion of medical authority over everyday life.

Details

Issues in Health and Health Care Related to Race/Ethnicity, Immigration, SES and Gender
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-125-0

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1963

THE proposition that British library schools should examine their own students is not a new one. As long ago as 1954, Roy Stokes put the question bluntly to the…

Abstract

THE proposition that British library schools should examine their own students is not a new one. As long ago as 1954, Roy Stokes put the question bluntly to the profession. In those days his was a voice crying in the wilderness. The profession at large was not ready for such a development, and continued to adhere to its long held view that the Library Association should examine the products of the schools, while the schools confined themselves to teaching.

Details

New Library World, vol. 65 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Book part
Publication date: 6 July 2021

Johanna A. Solomon

Abstract

Details

Four Dead in Ohio
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-807-4

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Book part
Publication date: 5 September 2014

Rachel R. Weinberger

Parking policy in the United States is dominated by zoning codes with minimum parking requirements stipulated for a variety of uses. Some cities have realized that this…

Abstract

Purpose

Parking policy in the United States is dominated by zoning codes with minimum parking requirements stipulated for a variety of uses. Some cities have realized that this approach has not yielded the desired policy outcomes; instead, it may be causing unintended consequences including added auto-travel, dispersed development, congestion, and air pollution that cities now wish to mitigate.

This paper identifies historic and contemporary trends in United States’ parking policy as cities gain additional insight and embrace new priorities.

Methodology/approach

Three emerging trends in the U.S. context are identified: Rethinking zoning codes that require parking with development; introducing pricing to better manage curb resources thereby cutting down curb-space competition; and looking for urban design solutions to parking access, location and on-site placement which can lead to more efficient mode use decisions.

The chapter provides an analysis of cases showing how cities are now seeking alternative approaches.

Findings

After many years of policy intervention focused on the alleviation of parking shortages by requiring additional off-street parking, cities are now seeking alternative approaches.

Practical implications

Cities can learn from each other’s experiences. New paradigms in parking policy will lead to different social outcomes: they could increase the cost of auto use (disadvantaging the poor) but decrease auto dependence (favoring the poor).

Originality/value of paper

The originality of this chapter is in the juxtaposition and analysis of trends that have, heretofore, had little exposure.

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