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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2024

Nicholas Roberts, Inchan Kim, Kishen Iyengar and Jennifer Pullin

Platform owners need to encourage yet control complementors in ways that generate benefits. Retaining too much control can restrict innovation and knowledge flows; giving up too…

Abstract

Purpose

Platform owners need to encourage yet control complementors in ways that generate benefits. Retaining too much control can restrict innovation and knowledge flows; giving up too much control can lead to poor quality and platform instability. Studies provide mixed findings that make it difficult to draw generalizable conclusions. We aim to provide a more accurate understanding of the link between platform control and platform benefits.

Design/methodology/approach

We conducted a meta-analysis of empirical research in this area.

Findings

Access-based control positively influences realization benefits, but it does not appear to affect creation benefits. Authority-based control does not appear to affect creation or realization benefits. Control is positively linked to benefits on transaction platforms but not on innovation platforms. Platform control is positively related to platform benefits in studies that use objective measures and in studies that measure control from the complementor’s perspective. However, the relationship between control and benefits is uncertain in studies that use perceptual measures and in studies that measure control from the owner’s perspective.

Research limitations/implications

Tighter restrictions on who can join the platform can lead to greater use of platform innovations. Platform control is also an effective driver of benefits on transaction platforms. Researchers should carefully think through the manner in which they measure platform control and platform benefits. Our study is limited by a small sample size, four moderators and a set of empirical-only studies.

Originality/value

Our findings can guide future research and help practitioners better understand when platform control is related to platform benefits.

Details

Internet Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2018

Jennifer Loy and Natalie Haskell

Cutting-edge hospital and residential care architecture and interior design aim to address the emotional and practical needs of patients, staff and visitors. Yet, whilst improving…

Abstract

Purpose

Cutting-edge hospital and residential care architecture and interior design aim to address the emotional and practical needs of patients, staff and visitors. Yet, whilst improving on past practice, current approaches to design still rarely recognise or respond to individuals. The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of design-led research into digital technology across disciplines for the personalisation of healthcare environments and is informed by the authors’ ongoing hospital-based research.

Design/methodology/approach

This review is based on a design anthropology framework providing insight into designing for changing the experience for older patients in current healthcare contexts and future focused strategies, integrating digital technologies and human-centred design across scale and disciplines. It is informed by ongoing hospital studies based on design-led research methodology, drawing on design anthropology and ethnographical methods.

Findings

Technology enhanced, human-centred, assistive devices and environments implemented into healthcare across scale are developing but integration is needed for meaningful experiences.

Research limitations/implications

This review is a positioning paper for design-led research into digital technology across scale and medium.

Practical implications

This paper provides the basis for practical research including the ongoing hospital-based research of the authors.

Social implications

This approach potentially enhances emotional experiences of connected healthcare.

Originality/value

Future care scenarios are proposed, with technology and human experience as key drivers. Individualised and personalised solutions better cater for diversity. Within this context, it is strategic to question and test new ways of crafting the older persons care experience. This paper brings new direction to this discussion.

Details

Journal of Enabling Technologies, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6263

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2020

Richard Conde, Victor Prybutok and Cameron Sumlin

Through the use of netnography, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the interaction of 192 inside sales agents who collaborate within discussion forums to create…

Abstract

Purpose

Through the use of netnography, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the interaction of 192 inside sales agents who collaborate within discussion forums to create communities of practice (CoPs). Drawing on situated learning theory and inside salespersons’ discussion forums, this study showcases how inside sales agents use CoPs to better their sales activity knowledge. This paper discovered how inside sales agents reach outside their organization to seek information within their mesosystem to positively impact sales activity knowledge outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used the use of netnography to follow the online community from afar, observing and capturing the essence of interaction without intruding on the conversation. Data from two inside sales professional discussion forums, 192 inside sales agents, produced nearly 67,161 words or 496 double-spaced pages.

Findings

This research demonstrates the power of CoPs. Inside sales agents seek information outside their company, within their mesosystem, to gain knowledge to improve sales activities. As boundary spanners, inside sales agents are not restricted, but rather, proactively find ways to consistently keep learning.

Practical implications

Organizations can and should implement internal CoPs to allow the exchange between sales agents in a more controlled matter. Furthermore, sales managers should proactively seek extern CoPs and introduced them to their organization as supplemental training.

Originality/value

The use of netnography is limited in sales literature. The research provides support for the use of netnography as it provides researchers firsthand access to multiple sales roles. This unadulterated access provides sales researchers the opportunity to study the many facets of sales, with pure, genuine data.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 June 2019

Simon Chester Evans, Julie Barrett, Neil Mapes, June Hennell, Teresa Atkinson, Jennifer Bray, Claire Garabedian and Chris Russell

The benefits of “green dementia care”, whereby people living with dementia are supported to connect with nature, are increasingly being recognised. Evidence suggests that these…

Abstract

Purpose

The benefits of “green dementia care”, whereby people living with dementia are supported to connect with nature, are increasingly being recognised. Evidence suggests that these benefits span physical, emotional and social spheres and can make a significant contribution towards quality of life. However, care settings often present specific challenges to promoting such connections due to a range of factors including risk-averse cultures and environmental limitations. The purpose of this paper is to report on a project that aims to explore the opportunities, benefits, barriers and enablers to interaction with nature for people living with dementia in residential care and extra care housing schemes in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered from 144 responses to an online survey by managers/staff of extra care housing schemes and care homes in the UK. In depth-case studies were carried out at three care homes and three extra care housing schemes, involving interviews with residents, staff and family carers.

Findings

A wide variety of nature-based activities were reported, both outdoor and indoor. Positive benefits reported included improved mood, higher levels of social interaction and increased motivation for residents, and greater job satisfaction for staff. The design and layout of indoor and outdoor spaces is key, in addition to staff who feel enabled to promote connections with nature.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is based on a relatively small research project in which the participants were self-selecting and therefore not necessarily representative.

Practical implications

The paper makes some key recommendations for good practice in green dementia care in extra care housing and care homes.

Social implications

Outdoor activities can promote social interaction for people living with dementia in care settings. The authors’ findings are relevant to the recent policy focus on social prescribing.

Originality/value

The paper makes some key recommendations for good practice in green dementia care in extra care housing and care homes.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 16 April 2012

Jennifer D. Chandler and Wes Johnston

This chapter reviews emergent research streams as a basis for a dynamic multilevel perspective on organizational buying behavior that can link seminal studies to more contemporary…

Abstract

This chapter reviews emergent research streams as a basis for a dynamic multilevel perspective on organizational buying behavior that can link seminal studies to more contemporary issues raised by managers and scholars alike. Since Johnston and Lewin's (1996) review, the literature does not include a comprehensive analysis of recent themes or general directions. From a managerial perspective, some of these issues that need coverage include the following questions. What are the best practices for integrating the organizational buying process with product design, development, and innovation? How can technology, media, and automation be leveraged in the buying process? For supplier relationships in which trust and commitment have been established, what are the best practices for using this to build competitive advantage? What are the best practices for leveraging the brands of products or services that are not owned by a firm? What are the best practices for managing buying processes across international markets?

Details

Business-to-Business Marketing Management: Strategies, Cases, and Solutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-576-1

Article
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Patrick Weretecki, Goetz Greve and Jörg Henseler

The purpose of this paper is to investigate selling actors in multi-actor sales ecosystems. When selling actors start taking over tasks that were formerly performed by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate selling actors in multi-actor sales ecosystems. When selling actors start taking over tasks that were formerly performed by salespeople, the distribution of tasks, allocation of responsibilities and finally the role of the salespeople changes. However, little is known about salespersons’ perceptions of selling actors’ identities and participation behavior in multi-actor sales ecosystems.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a World Café, a new qualitative method to the field of sales research, to obtain first data on selling actor identities in multi-actor sales ecosystems. Salespeople, who had the chance to observe and interact with more than 98,000 selling actors, disclosed their perceptions of selling actors’ participation behavior in a multi-actor sales ecosystem. Four different data sources were analyzed using qualitative content analysis to develop a comprehensive understanding of the topic and to test validity through the convergence of information from different sources.

Findings

Using identity theory, a salesperson–selling actor relationship/behavior typology for multi-actor sales ecosystems was developed. Eight different selling actor identities were identified: avoider, observer, receptive actor, prepper, expecter, savvy actor, challenger and coworker.

Originality/value

The typology provides researchers and managers with a tool to better understand and evaluate sales ecosystems. This knowledge can be used as a starting point for the reassessment of the knowledge, skills and abilities necessary for salespeople in multi-actor sales ecosystems and to improve their training and coaching. The firsthand experiences reported by the participants of the World Café enable salespeople to identify different selling actors faster and prepare fitting approaches for all selling actor identities.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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