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Article
Publication date: 18 August 2022

Owen P. O'Sullivan, Anita Bignell, Jennifer Powell, Sandra Parish, Lloyd Campbell, Hannah Iannelli, Chris Attoe and Grégoire Billon

During COVID-19, Maudsley Simulation successfully pivoted to fully online delivery of simulation-based education (SBE) in mental health. In migrating digitally, the…

Abstract

Purpose

During COVID-19, Maudsley Simulation successfully pivoted to fully online delivery of simulation-based education (SBE) in mental health. In migrating digitally, the simulation faculty experienced a range of new phenomena and challenges. The authors’ experiences may be transferable to other specialities and for other educator groups. By sharing the authors’ experiences, this study aims to support others adapt to online SBE.

Design/methodology/approach

This piece represents the authors’ collective reflections on the challenges of adapting their facilitation skills to the online environment. It also offers various suggestions on how to improve the learner experience in view of these challenges.

Findings

Beyond merely platform orientation and operating procedure familiarisation, the team gained insights into ensuring optimal learning, engagement and participant experience during online deliveries. Delivery of online SBE brings several potential barriers to psychological safety and these warrant careful consideration by experienced simulationists.

Practical implications

Optimising participant engagement and psychological safety remain key considerations despite this novel medium. Facilitators must be willing to adapt accordingly to begin delivering high-quality online SBE.

Originality/value

From their experience, facilitators must reframe their debriefing expectations and adjust how they engage participants and manage group dynamics given the inherently different nature of this new learning environment.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 September 2017

Justin J. W. Powell, Frank Fernandez, John T. Crist, Jennifer Dusdal, Liang Zhang and David P. Baker

This chapter provides an overview of the findings and chapters of a thematic volume in the International Perspectives on Education and Society (IPES) series. It describes…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter provides an overview of the findings and chapters of a thematic volume in the International Perspectives on Education and Society (IPES) series. It describes the common dataset and methods used by an international research team.

Design/methodology/approach

The chapter synthesizes the results of a series of country-level case studies and cross-national and regional comparisons on the growth of scientific research from 1900 until 2011. Additionally, the chapter provides a quantitative analysis of global trends in scientific, peer-reviewed publishing over the same period.

Findings

The introduction identifies common themes that emerged across the case studies examined in-depth during the multi-year research project Science Productivity, Higher Education, Research and Development and the Knowledge Society (SPHERE). First, universities have long been and are increasingly the primary organizations in science production around the globe. Second, the chapters describe in-country and cross-country patterns of competition and collaboration in scientific publications. Third, the chapters describe the national policy environments and institutionalized organizational forms that foster scientific research.

Originality/value

The introduction reviews selected findings and limitations of previous bibliometric studies and explains that the chapters in the volume address these limitations by applying neo-institutional theoretical frameworks to analyze bibliometric data over an extensive period.

Book part
Publication date: 1 September 2017

Justin J. W. Powell and Jennifer Dusdal

Growth in scientific production and productivity over the 20th century resulted significantly from three major countries in European science – France, Germany, and the…

Abstract

Purpose

Growth in scientific production and productivity over the 20th century resulted significantly from three major countries in European science – France, Germany, and the United Kingdom. Charting the development of universities and research institutes that bolster Europe’s key position in global science, we uncover both stable and dynamic patterns of productivity in the fields of STEM, including health, over the 20th century. Ongoing internationalization of higher education and science has been accompanied by increasing competition and collaboration. Despite policy goals to foster innovation and expand research capacity, policies cannot fully account for the differential growth of scientific productivity we chart from 1975 to 2010.

Approach and Research Design

Our sociological neo-institutional framework facilitates explanation of differences in institutional settings, organizational forms, and organizations that produce the most European research. We measure growth of published peer-reviewed articles indexed in Thomson Reuters’ Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE).

Findings

Organizational forms vary in their contributions, with universities accounting for nearly half but rising in France; ultrastable in Germany at four-fifths, and growing at around two-thirds in the United Kingdom. Differing institutionalization pathways created the conditions necessary for continuous, but varying growth in scientific production and productivity in the European center of global science. The research university is key in all three countries, and we identify organizations leading in research output.

Originality/value

Few studies explicitly compare across time, space, and different levels of analysis. We show how important European science has been to overall global science production and productivity. In-depth comparisons, especially the organizational fields and forms in which science is produced, are crucial if policy is to support research and development.

Details

The Century of Science
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-469-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Caroline L. Davey, James A. Powell, Ian Cooper and Jennifer E. Powell

Action learning is intended to enable a group of professionals (a SET) to tackle work problems, develop solutions and reflect upon the success and failure of their…

1843

Abstract

Action learning is intended to enable a group of professionals (a SET) to tackle work problems, develop solutions and reflect upon the success and failure of their actions. As part of the UK construction industry's drive to improve learning and performance, four SETs of small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) were established. This paper evaluates the capacity of action learning to promote innovation and use of technologies within a CIOB‐funded SET located in Watford. Construction companies were unable to address real problems related to their day‐to‐day activities due to competition. Instead, they identified an industry‐wide issue – a lack of quality recruits – and marshalled resources to provide better careers advice and promote opportunities for builders. The role of action learning in empowering construction SMEs to contribute to industry change programmes is explored.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2021

Jennifer Dusdal, Mike Zapp, Marcelo Marques and Justin J.W. Powell

Informed by multiple disciplines, theories, and methods, higher education scholars have developed a robust and diverse literature in many countries. Yet, some important…

Abstract

Informed by multiple disciplines, theories, and methods, higher education scholars have developed a robust and diverse literature in many countries. Yet, some important (organizational) sociological perspectives, both more established and more recent, are insufficiently linked. In particular, we identify two theoretical strands – institutional and relational – that, when joined, help to explain contemporary developments in global higher education and yield new organizational insights. We review relevant literature from each perspective, both in their general formulations and with specific reference to contemporary higher education research. Within the broad institutional strand, we highlight strategic action fields, organizational actorhood, and associational memberships. Within the relational strand, we focus on ties and relationships that are especially crucial as science has entered an age of (inter)national research collaboration. Across these theories, we discuss linkages between concepts, objects, and levels of analysis. We explore the methodological approach of social network analysis as it offers great potential to connect these strands and, thus, to advance contemporary higher education research in a collaborative era.

Details

Theory and Method in Higher Education Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-441-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 October 2018

Kimberly R. Powell and Jennifer J. Elder

The purpose of this paper is to report on the development and analysis of an internal bibliometric services workshop for subject librarians. Primary goals of the workshop…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the development and analysis of an internal bibliometric services workshop for subject librarians. Primary goals of the workshop were to create an opportunity for collegial knowledge and skill sharing, and to identify discipline specific gaps and future support requirements.

Design/methodology/approach

Two campus librarians who typically offer bibliometric support services used pre- and post-surveys to plan and assess the workshop for subject liaison librarians.

Findings

Subject librarians from across the university expressed interest in developing bibliometric support services. The 12 workshop participants (30 percent of subject librarians) support diverse areas including the humanities, social sciences, life sciences, education and outreach, and the school of business. Post-workshop survey respondents highlighted the contextualization of available measures and the appropriate application of metrics in different disciplines to be the most helpful topics covered. Finally, while the institution subscribes to several citation analysis databases, more familiarity with Google Scholar citations was requested to address user needs and preferences across the various disciplines. Most participants expressed interest in attending additional workshops.

Originality/value

This study showcases the experience of campus librarians working together across academic schools and disciplines to respond to the increasing demand for bibliometric and scholarly impact support services. While services such as citation analysis have typically been siloed in specific job descriptions or subject areas within the library, these are service areas that can benefit from internal library-collaboration opportunities and knowledge sharing.

Details

Library Management, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 November 2020

Lauren T. Meaux, Stephanie C. Doran and Jennifer M. Cox

Unconscious biases against certain groups aid in forming assumptions which may be promulgated in the USA via popular news media linking rare but memorable violent acts…

Abstract

Purpose

Unconscious biases against certain groups aid in forming assumptions which may be promulgated in the USA via popular news media linking rare but memorable violent acts with specific groups. However, the relationship between marginalized group association, assumptions regarding the motive for violent acts and individual media consumption has never been directly examined. This study aims to directly examine this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

In the present study, individuals read a vignette of a mass shooting in which the perpetrator’s implied religion (i.e. Islam or unknown religion) was manipulated. Participants then indicated their assumptions regarding motive (i.e. terrorism or mental illness) and personal media consumption habits.

Findings

Contrary to hypotheses, differences in assumed motive based on implied religion were not found; participants were not more likely to associate an assumed Muslim perpetrator with terrorism as a motive or consider the assumed non-Muslim perpetrator to be mentally ill.

Originality/value

These unexpected findings are discussed in the context of the data-collection period, which coincidentally overlapped with a well-publicized act of domestic terrorism that led to a unique national debate regarding biased news coverage and associations between religion, ethnicity, terrorism and mental illness.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 October 2013

Jennifer Emanuel

Usability studies are a form of library evaluation that are often passed off as research. However, at its core, usability is an evaluation method, not a research method…

2704

Abstract

Purpose

Usability studies are a form of library evaluation that are often passed off as research. However, at its core, usability is an evaluation method, not a research method. The goal is to make an argument that usability studies can be a valid form of scholarly research if certain limitations inherent in usability studies are addressed in the research design.

Design/methodology/approach

Through evaluating literature in the social sciences, this paper makes an argument for usability as a research method if certain limitations inherent within usability testing are addressed.

Findings

Usability is not only an evaluation method, but when limitations are addressed; it can be considered an important research tool within libraries.

Originality/value

No other article in the library and information sciences literature talks about methodologies for usability. Most usability articles do not address methodologies utilized in a way that would be considered research in a broader social sciences context. This article bridges the gap from when usability is considered evaluation to when it is considered research within library science.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 August 2022

Corina Joseph, Mariam Rahmat, Sharifah Norzehan Syed Yusuf, Jennifer Tunga Janang and Nero Madi

This paper aims to describe the development of the ethical values disclosure index (EVDi) for Malaysian companies using the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 16 and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the development of the ethical values disclosure index (EVDi) for Malaysian companies using the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 16 and isomorphism perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports an inclusive examination of international and national guidelines in relation to the code of ethics and ethical values in making the disclosure.

Findings

The final 10 categories and 40 items under review have been developed in an instrument, the proposed EVDi, for measuring the commitment undertaken by companies in communicating ethical values information to stakeholders.

Research limitations/implications

The EVDi may fulfil the function of good governance to inculcate ethical work culture throughout companies.

Social implications

Effective ethical values in communication may reduce the likelihood of illegal activities and cost of acting unethically in organisations.

Originality/value

The value of this paper is its approach of using the isomorphism concept from the institutional theory to address the SDG 16 by developing the EVDi. The new index incorporates core elements of moral values adapted mainly from the professional bodies that regulate the accounting profession and other related organisations. The index is an initiative used to measure companies' commitment to promoting ethical values through disclosure. The efforts to measure the level of commitment supporting the SDG 16 promote effective, accountable and transparent institutions at all levels.

Details

International Journal of Ethics and Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9369

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 3 December 2005

Paul Paolucci, Micah Holland and Shannon Williams

Machiavelli's dictums in The Prince (1977) instigated the modern discourse on power. Arguing that “there's such a difference between the way we really live and the way we…

Abstract

Machiavelli's dictums in The Prince (1977) instigated the modern discourse on power. Arguing that “there's such a difference between the way we really live and the way we ought to live that the man who neglects the real to study the ideal will learn to accomplish his ruin, not his salvation” (Machiavelli, 1977, p. 44), his approach is a realist one. In this text, Machiavelli (1977, p. 3) endeavors to “discuss the rule of princes” and to “lay down principles for them.” Taking his lead, Foucault (1978, p. 97) argued that “if it is true that Machiavelli was among the few…who conceived the power of the Prince in terms of force relationships, perhaps we need to go one step further, do without the persona of the Prince, and decipher mechanisms on the basis of a strategy that is immanent in force relationships.” He believed that we should “investigate…how mechanisms of power have been able to function…how these mechanisms…have begun to become economically advantageous and politically useful…in a given context for specific reasons,” and, therefore, “we should…base our analysis of power on the study of the techniques and tactics of domination” (Foucault, 1980, pp. 100–102). Conceptualizing such techniques and tactics as the “art of governance”, Foucault (1991), examined power as strategies geared toward managing civic populations through shaping people's dispositions and behaviors.

Details

Social Theory as Politics in Knowledge
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-363-1

1 – 10 of 221