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Article

Jennifer O’Neill

The purpose of this innovative, highly replicable paper is to teach library staff learn to use mobile apps to lead and assist patrons and effectively market library services.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this innovative, highly replicable paper is to teach library staff learn to use mobile apps to lead and assist patrons and effectively market library services.

Design/methodology/approach

This web-based class introduces participants to one mobile app a week. Participants must download the app to an Apple or Droid device, complete an activity and answer a few thought-provoking questions. Participants’ time commitment does not exceed one hour per week.

Findings

Participants were proud and excited to have mastered their mobile device and 23 mobile apps. They reported that they planned to create programs to teach apps to patrons, market their services using apps and continue to stay current with technological advances.

Researchlimitations/implications

Participants need to have access to a mobile device.

Practicalimplications

Library directors allowed staff to use an hour a week of work time to complete this program.

Socialimplications

Library staff enjoyed talking about the apps and working together. Each Monday morning when a new app was revealed, they competed to be the first to complete the activity and post answers to the questions online. They had fun.

Originality/value

This program allows customization. It was customized to meet the strategic needs of the authors’ organization, encouraging a sense of community among participants, marketing their services and highlighting member libraries that were already using some of the apps well. (One of our libraries had their own app and that became one of the Things.)

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

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Article

Evelyn S. Meyer

When Eugene O'Neill died, theatre critic Brooks Atkinson said of him, “A giant writer has dropped off the earth….He shook up the drama as well as audiences and helped to…

Abstract

When Eugene O'Neill died, theatre critic Brooks Atkinson said of him, “A giant writer has dropped off the earth….He shook up the drama as well as audiences and helped to transform the theatre into an art seriously related to life.” (New York Times, 30 December 1953).

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article

Jennifer O Neill

When electricity was cheap, manual block light switching on a first‐in, last‐out basis was acceptable, with the result that many buildings were lit for up to 15 hours a…

Abstract

When electricity was cheap, manual block light switching on a first‐in, last‐out basis was acceptable, with the result that many buildings were lit for up to 15 hours a day irrespective of the contribution of daylight or even of the presence of people. Behavioural studies at the Building Research Establishment (BRE) have shown that switching on occurs at the start of occupancy if the daylight is judged to be insufficient, but switching off only occurs when the space becomes empty. In other words, while people are very good at turning lights on when they feel they need them, they are very forgetful when it comes to switching them off when they are no longer required.

Details

Facilities, vol. 3 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article

Jennifer O′Neill

Reports briefly on the issue of PC equipment/hardware and datasecurity and how it should be handled by facilities managers.

Abstract

Reports briefly on the issue of PC equipment/hardware and data security and how it should be handled by facilities managers.

Details

Facilities, vol. 8 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article

Jennifer K. O'Neill, V. Laina and S. Wilson

The purpose of this article to study referrals to our hand service to find out how long they had been waiting and with what sort of clinical conditions. The Department of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article to study referrals to our hand service to find out how long they had been waiting and with what sort of clinical conditions. The Department of Health monitors outpatient's waiting time as the percentage of patients seen within a 13‐week target. This target does not include patients referred by consultants or other health professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

All the referral letters from other consultants or healthcare professionals still awaiting appointments were collected. The referrals were read and studied to ascertain the most likely diagnosis. This was recorded along with the source of the referral and the details to whom the referral was made. The date of the referral letter being received by the department (date stamped) was also noted.

Findings

A total of 157 referrals from consultants or healthcare professionals were waiting outpatient dates. The median waiting time was 448 days (range 20‐952 days). The most frequent source of referrals was from the orthopaedic department. Carpal tunnel syndrome was the most common problem awaiting an outpatient appointment.

Originality/value

The wait for a clinic appointment for these patients is long. This has come about as the result of the fact that the government targets for outpatient waiting times have been set for GP referrals alone and exclude referrals that have been made by other consultants or other healthcare professionals. This is a clinical governance issue for the Hospital Trust, the Primary Care Trust and for general practitioners.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

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Book part

Jennifer O’Neill, Timothy McCuddy and Finn-Aage Esbensen

Purpose – In the midst of the second wave of data collection for a Comprehensive School Safety Initiative (CSSI) research project, a mass shooting occurred at Marjory…

Abstract

Purpose – In the midst of the second wave of data collection for a Comprehensive School Safety Initiative (CSSI) research project, a mass shooting occurred at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. This tragic incident provoked responses across the United States, including intense political discourse, organized student protests, and active shooter drills. In order to assess the potential influence of a major threat to school safety on the perceptions of adolescents, this chapter analyzes the survey responses of middle and high school students in St. Louis County.

Methodology/approach – Approximately one-third of the sample was surveyed prior to the shooting and the remaining students completed surveys within three months after the shooting. The authors examines the potential influence of the shooting on students’ reports on a number of school safety issues, including fear and perceived risk of victimization, likelihood of reporting guns on campus, and engaging in avoidance behaviors.

Findings – Results indicate that the shooting significantly influenced students’ perceptions of school disorder and likelihood of reporting a weapon at school, especially in white, less disadvantaged schools. The results also reflect meaningful effects based on the timing of data collection post-shooting, with many of the significant changes appearing within three weeks after February 14, 2018.

Originality/value – This study explores how external events may influence student perceptions of school safety. Moreover, this study offers a methodological contribution by demonstrating an assessment of the Parkland shooting as a potential threat to internal validity.

Details

Methods of Criminology and Criminal Justice Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-865-9

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Methods of Criminology and Criminal Justice Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-865-9

Content available
Article

Dorothy Newbury-Birch, Ruth McGovern, Jennifer Birch, Gillian O'Neill, Hannah Kaner, Arun Sondhi and Kieran Lynch

The purpose of this paper is to review the evidence of alcohol use disorders within the different stages of the criminal justice system in the UK. Furthermore it reviewed…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the evidence of alcohol use disorders within the different stages of the criminal justice system in the UK. Furthermore it reviewed the worldwide evidence of alcohol brief interventions in the various stages of the criminal justice system.

Design/methodology/approach

A rapid systematic review of publications was conducted from the year 2000 to 2014 regarding the prevalence of alcohol use disorders in the various stages of the criminal justice system. The second part of the work was a rapid review of effectiveness studies of interventions for alcohol brief interventions. Studies were included if they had a comparison group. Worldwide evidence was included that consisted of up to three hours of face-to-face brief intervention either in one session or numerous sessions.

Findings

This review found that 64-88 per cent of adults in the police custody setting; 95 per cent in the magistrate court setting; 53-69 per cent in the probation setting and 5,913-863 per cent in the prison system and 64 per cent of young people in the criminal justice system in the UK scored positive for an alcohol use disorder. There is very little evidence of effectiveness of brief interventions in the various stages of the criminal justice system mainly due to the lack of follow-up data.

Social implications

Brief alcohol interventions have a large and robust evidence base for reducing alcohol use in risky drinkers, particularly in primary care settings. However, there is little evidence of effect upon drinking levels in criminal justice settings. Whilst the approach shows promise with some effects being shown on alcohol-related harm as well as with young people in the USA, more robust research is needed to ascertain effectiveness of alcohol brief interventions in this setting.

Originality/value

This paper provides evidence of alcohol use disorders in the different stages of the criminal justice system in the UK using a validated tool as well as reviewing the worldwide evidence for short ( < three hours) alcohol brief intervention in this setting.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

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Article

Frances Neel Cheney

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Tenn. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here…

Abstract

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Tenn. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are available through normal trade sources. Mrs. Cheney, being a member of the editorial board of Pierian Press, will not review Pierian Press reference books in this column. Descriptions of Pierian Press reference books will be included elsewhere in this publication.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Abstract

Details

Methods of Criminology and Criminal Justice Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-865-9

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