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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Jennifer Iles and Michael Healy

Discussion of the relationship between TQM and information and communications technology (ICT) normally focuses either on technological issues, or on the role of ICT in…

Abstract

Discussion of the relationship between TQM and information and communications technology (ICT) normally focuses either on technological issues, or on the role of ICT in enabling the achievement of quality goals by means of business process re‐engineering. Less attention has been paid to the effects that the increased utilisation of ICT is having on management style, and on the quality of relationships. This paper reports on research undertaken into the development, implementation and enforcement of codes of conduct designed to govern employees' use of ICT. A study of 125 London‐based employers found that, although such codes had been introduced in nearly three‐quarters of the organisations, the majority failed to address a key issue of concern to customers – privacy of personal data. Furthermore, the codes themselves were seen to have little influence on the behaviour of employees. The reasons for this are discussed within a TQM framework, and suggestions made as to how compliance might be improved in future.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Jonathan C. Morris

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within…

Abstract

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within and shows that these are in many, differing, areas across management research from: retail finance; precarious jobs and decisions; methodological lessons from feminism; call centre experience and disability discrimination. These and all points east and west are covered and laid out in a simple, abstract style, including, where applicable, references, endnotes and bibliography in an easy‐to‐follow manner. Summarizes each paper and also gives conclusions where needed, in a comfortable modern format.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 9/10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2021

Nathan Houchens, Stacy L. Sivils, Elizabeth Koester, David Ratz, Jennifer Ridenour and Sanjay Saint

Leadership development may be a key strategy to enhance job satisfaction, reduce burnout and improve patient safety in health-care systems. This study aims to assess…

Abstract

Purpose

Leadership development may be a key strategy to enhance job satisfaction, reduce burnout and improve patient safety in health-care systems. This study aims to assess feasibility of a leadership development series in an effort to invigorate a collaborative culture, create peer networks and elevate autonomy in daily work.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors implemented a collectivistic leadership development series titled Fueling Leadership in Yourself. The series was designed for all types of health-care workers in the medicine service at a tertiary referral center for veterans. Two series of leadership development sessions with varied experiential learning methods were facilitated by content experts. Subjects focused on leadership approaches and attributes applicable to all roles within a health-care system. The authors collected participant perceptions using pre- and post-series surveys. Primary outcomes were understanding and applicability of leadership concepts, employee engagement in leadership, satisfaction with training and work environment and qualitative reflections.

Findings

A total of 26 respondents (of 38 participants) from 8 departments and several role types increased their knowledge of leadership techniques, were highly satisfied with and would recommend the series and found leadership principles applicable to their daily work. Participants continued to use skills years after the series.

Practical implications

Short, intermittent, collectivistic leadership development sessions appear effective in expanding knowledge, satisfaction and skills used in daily practice for a diverse group of health-care workers.

Originality/value

Novel programmatic aspects included inviting all types of health-care workers, practicing universally applicable content and using a variety of active, experiential learning methods.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Robert M. Blackburn

Investigates the possible social causes of unemployment; focuses on how competition among employers can increase and perpetuate already high levels of unemployment. Starts…

Abstract

Investigates the possible social causes of unemployment; focuses on how competition among employers can increase and perpetuate already high levels of unemployment. Starts from the premise that, despite divergent attitudes, most industrialized nations make some collective provision for the unemployed, with firms ultimately bearing the costs. Describes how, although a firm may reduce its labour force to save money, it is ultimately, albeit collectively, paying the costs of unemployment via taxes to the State ‐ the main effect is to redistribute the costs to other organizations; depicts a resulting downward spiral in the economy. Looks at the relationships between increased productivity and the costs to society. Concludes that competitive unemployment is a reality and suggests possible solutions.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 19 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2007

Amy Lodge and David Bamford

The purpose of this research is to focus on a hospital Division of Diagnostics and Clinical Support (150 medical, 1,975 non‐medical staff) and how systems were enhanced…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to focus on a hospital Division of Diagnostics and Clinical Support (150 medical, 1,975 non‐medical staff) and how systems were enhanced through lean principles application to facilitate quality and performance improvement.

Design/methodology/approach

An action research methodology was adopted. The research involved: review of available performance and quality improvement literature; identification of the systems that required improvement; adoption and implementation of new working methods.

Findings

The results were recognised as being beneficial to all parties, especially the patients! Staff recognised the need for change; the process transformation was actually welcomed. Patient waiting times reduced from 26 to 13 weeks. Fast‐track/“query cancer” service for out‐patients now within ten days; the majority of in‐patients receive imaging within 72 hours. Ultimately, patients are diagnosed faster and treatment commences earlier. Departmental managers can effectively manage capacity to meet demand because they now understand the waiting “profile”.

Research limitations/implications

The methodology applied was appropriate, generating data to facilitate discussion and from which to draw conclusions. A perceived limitation is the single case approach; however, Remenyi et al. argue that this can be enough to add to the body of knowledge.

Practical implications

Guidelines indicating “What went well?” and “What could have gone better?” were produced. These centred on the practical application aspects. The implementation methodology developed is being used elsewhere within the same hospital group.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates that the application of improvement techniques, such as “Lean”, can focus efforts to improve performance. This is of value to those working in the UK healthcare and wider public sector.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Victoria L. Pace and Jennifer L. Kisamore

To maximize their effectiveness, exit interviews should incorporate employee voice and be aligned with other HR processes. The purpose of this paper is to describe a…

Abstract

Purpose

To maximize their effectiveness, exit interviews should incorporate employee voice and be aligned with other HR processes. The purpose of this paper is to describe a three-step approach to the strategic use of exit interviews.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study synthesizes extant theory including that of employee voice to enhance the exit interview process. A qualitative study conducted within a large marketing research organization demonstrates how exit interviews that utilize employee voice can inform HR and organizational strategy.

Findings

Application of the proposed process to the case study revealed conditions, critical incidents, and cognitive processes underlying exit decisions for employees in several job categories. Qualitative exit information is used to describe corresponding employee withdrawal paths.

Practical implications

Use of the three-step exit interview process is expected to enhance HR decisions. Data gathered from the three-step process can be used by HR and organizational leaders to develop action plans as well as inform an organization’s strategic decisions.

Originality/value

An organizational example is presented in which insight into underlying causes of voluntary turnover are discovered through exit interviews. Exit interview information suggested interventions related to HR processes. Such targeted insights from exit interviews can greatly improve retention and enhance organizational effectiveness.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2017

Rob Elkington, Noel James Pearse, Jennifer Moss, Madeleine Van der Steege and Suzanne Martin

The purpose of this paper is to develop a clear answer to the question “how is leadership developed?” This research utilized the knowledge of leadership development…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a clear answer to the question “how is leadership developed?” This research utilized the knowledge of leadership development experts and their collective expertise to identify the critical elements required for a high-quality leadership development program.

Design/methodology/approach

The Lockean Inquiring System approach to the Delphi technique was used to solicit the views of experts in leadership and leadership development from around the world. Experts for Round 1 of the Delphi were drawn from a random sampling of 100 people, comprising leadership researchers, coaches, and organizational leaders, not personally known to the lead researcher of this project, but in his LinkedIn network. A response rate of 13 percent (n=13) yielded a rich range of qualitative data. Responses from the first round of the Delphi were analyzed using open coding and categorized into four themes, representing four sets of competencies required of leaders.

Findings

The four themes were labeled as contextual, human capital, social capital, and structural capital, all of which were seen by participants as being central to the development of collective leadership. Based on these themes, this paper identifies a useful list of key leadership development tactics from which those wishing to develop a leadership program can work.

Research limitations/implications

As the first round of a Delphi study, the authors are limited to presenting only the key elementary empirical judgments. Subsequent study with an expanded sample size and a refined set of questions rooted in the current data will contribute further to the development of factual propositions related to leadership development for the twenty-first century. The Delphi survey is a “snapshot” approach and presents a holographic-type image of the complex whole. The authors plan to triangulate the data by significantly expanding the pool of Delphi experts and conducting the Round 1 survey a second time with a larger international group of respondents that fit the criteria of expert.

Practical implications

This paper presents four dimensions of an effective leadership development strategy.

Originality/value

Core elements of the best methods for leadership development have been identified by leadership development experts, which serve as a basis for developing leadership as a collective, and for further research.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 38 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2011

Wendi Cross and Jennifer West

The positive outcomes demonstrated in programme efficacy trials and the apparent ineffectiveness of programmes in community settings have prompted investigators and…

Abstract

The positive outcomes demonstrated in programme efficacy trials and the apparent ineffectiveness of programmes in community settings have prompted investigators and practitioners to examine implementation fidelity. Critically important, but often overlooked, are the implementers who deliver evidence‐based programmes. This article distinguishes fidelity at the programme level from implementer fidelity. Two components of implementer fidelity are defined. It is proposed that implementer adherence and competence are related but unique constructs that can be reliably measured for training, monitoring and outcomes research. Observational measures from a school‐based preventive intervention are used to illustrate the contributions of implementer adherence and competence. Distinguishing implementer adherence to the manual from competence in programme delivery is the next step in child mental health programme implementation research.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1998

Sunny Baker

A former Microsoft insider believes that Microsoft prevails not because of its ability to innovate but because of its capacity for covering all the bases.

Abstract

A former Microsoft insider believes that Microsoft prevails not because of its ability to innovate but because of its capacity for covering all the bases.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2010

Siwan Mitchelmore and Jennifer Rowley

Entrepreneurial competencies are seen as important to business growth and success. The purpose of this paper is therefore to undertake a literature review of research on…

Abstract

Purpose

Entrepreneurial competencies are seen as important to business growth and success. The purpose of this paper is therefore to undertake a literature review of research on entrepreneurial competence in order to: provide an integrated account of contributions relating to entrepreneurial competencies by different authors working in different countries and different industry sectors and at different points in time; and, develop an agenda for future research, and practice in relation to entrepreneurial competencies.

Design/methodology/approach

The article starts with a review of the development of the concept of competence, with particular reference to its use in the context of management competencies. It then draws together views on the notion of entrepreneurial competence before exploring and summarising research on the link between entrepreneurial competencies and business performance and growth. A core section then compares the models of entrepreneurial competencies cited in the literature, and on this basis proposes a set of entrepreneurial competencies which can be used as the basis for further research and practice. Finally, the different perspectives adopted by researchers to the measurement of entrepreneurial competencies are reviewed.

Findings

Conclusions suggest that although the concept of entrepreneurial competencies is used widely by government agencies and others in their drive for economic development and business success, the core concept of entrepreneurial competencies, its measurement and its relationship to entrepreneurial performance and business success is in need of further rigorous research and development in practice.

Originality/value

This article integrates previous models of entrepreneurial competencies towards the development of an entrepreneurial competency framework.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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