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Article
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Christina Riehman-Murphy and Jennifer Hunter

The purpose of this paper is to provide evidence of the value of Research Parties, a new model of supplementary reference in a social environment.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide evidence of the value of Research Parties, a new model of supplementary reference in a social environment.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of multiple choice and open-ended questions was administered to Research Party participants (n = 43) over the course of three semesters to discover the profiles of the undergraduate students who attended and how they heard about the event and to assess the value of the interaction to the student.

Findings

Respondents unanimously agreed that their interactions with librarians at Research Parties were helpful because their information seeking needs, including finding sources, learning how to search databases, gaining clarity into the assignment, writing and citing, were met. Respondents also mentioned attributes of the librarian’s disposition or attitude such as enthusiastic conversation, encouragement and patience. Several students reflected on their own learning process and noted that they would seek help from a librarian again.

Practical implications

The results demonstrate that Research Parties are helpful to undergraduate students and a worthwhile model for academic libraries looking to complement their traditional reference services.

Originality/value

While faculty and administrators have verbally expressed excitement about Research Parties, librarian colleagues have anecdotally reported success instituting this model at their institutions, and students have provided informal positive feedback, this is the first time the model has been evaluated more formally to capture its value.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2021

Lily Hunter and Sarah A. Buchanan

The authors ask the question of how libraries can advocate for themselves and for those who most need the library during the pandemic, and evaluate how the authors adapt…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors ask the question of how libraries can advocate for themselves and for those who most need the library during the pandemic, and evaluate how the authors adapt to a future of helping underserved and underrepresented populations in new ways after it subsides.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data currently being provided by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other sources, prior issue analyses dealing with library programs and advocacy, and lessons from a few dystopian novels, the authors lay out the political and social implications of the coronavirus on libraries now and in the future.

Findings

Because the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic shut down physical library buildings everywhere, forcing extremely slow re-openings and decimating library programs, conversation is building now on how libraries will overcome its massive blow. Underrepresented populations who most need library information (namely, the homeless, Native Americans, Black and Hispanic peoples among others) are suffering disproportionately from the pandemic and its aftereffects that are just beginning to reverberate.

Originality/value

This paper presents a viewpoint backed by lessons from American history, specifically the Civil Rights Movement, and the dystopian novel 1984 by George Orwell. Currently, the conversations around what will happen to libraries are limited, but will hopefully grow as libraries (and the rest of the world) attempt to move forward in an unprecedented situation.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2015

Abstract

Details

Video Reflection in Literacy Teacher Education and Development: Lessons from Research and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-676-8

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2019

Jennifer Game

New circus explores a wide range of contemporary global and existential questions. From the dystopian performances of pioneering French new circus Archaos, and the ongoing…

Abstract

New circus explores a wide range of contemporary global and existential questions. From the dystopian performances of pioneering French new circus Archaos, and the ongoing social justice agenda of Circus Oz, to the themes of social decay and environmental degradation in Oozing Future’s 2019 production Autocannibal, new circus has sought innovative ways to challenge and confront audiences mediated by the human body. With a focus on emotive narrative representations of risk and death, this qualitative research examines the interaction of embodied movement and music in Zebastian Hunter’s Lacanian-inspired Empty Bodies and the author’s development of a circus opera, The Blood Vote. The immediate and embodied artforms of music and circus combine to engender a non-literal, yet powerful, form of speech surrogacy that communicates meaning and emotion, so we are reminded that anything is possible, not least of which is the illusion of the victory of life over death that circus performance itself embodies. Death is ever present in life, a fact we try to repress; circus confronts the audience with the undoing of this repression: we are going to die. This is what captivates us. In this way, contemporary new circus functions as an important signifier of meaning in contemporary performing arts.

Details

Music and Death: Interdisciplinary Readings and Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-945-3

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Book part
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Shellie McMurdo and Wickham Clayton

Roland Joffé, the film-maker behind the significant critical hits The Killing Fields (1984) and The Mission (1986), employed a hypnotic aesthetic, which unflinchingly…

Abstract

Roland Joffé, the film-maker behind the significant critical hits The Killing Fields (1984) and The Mission (1986), employed a hypnotic aesthetic, which unflinchingly depicted violence and brutality within different cultural contexts. In 2007, he used a no less impressive aesthetic in a similar way, although this film, Captivity, was met with public outcry, including from self-proclaimed feminist film-maker Joss Whedon. This was based upon the depiction, in advertisements, of gendered violence in the popularly termed ‘torture porn’ subgenre, which itself has negative gendered connotations.

We aim to revisit the critical reception of Captivity in light of this public controversy, looking at the gendered tensions within considerations of genre, narration and aesthetics. Critics assumed Captivity was an attempt to capitalize on the popularity of the torture horror subgenre, and there is evidence that the film-makers inserted scenes of gore throughout the narrative to encourage this affiliation. However, this chapter will consider how the film works as both an example of post-peak torture horror and an interesting precursor to more overtly feminist horror, such as A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night (2014) and Raw (2017). This is seen through the aesthetic and narrative centralizing of a knowing conflict between genders, which, while not entirely successful, does uniquely aim to provide commentary on the gender roles which genre criticism of horror has long considered implicit to the genre’s structures and pleasures.

Details

Gender and Contemporary Horror in Film
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-898-7

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Pamela Schlauderaff, Tracy Baldino, K.C. Graham, Katie Hackney, Rebecca Hendryx, Jennifer Nelson, Allen Millard, Caleb Hunter Schlauderaff, Mark Schlauderaff, Dodie Smith and Michael Millard

Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening saves patient suffering and health system expenses if the pathology is found in its early stages. Utilizing rapid process improvement…

Abstract

Purpose

Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening saves patient suffering and health system expenses if the pathology is found in its early stages. Utilizing rapid process improvement cycles, the purpose of this paper is to improve the rate of CRC screening in a rural community in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered from the authors’ electronic medical record. Non provider staff were trained to do the majority of the work utilizing population health, clinic visit checklists, and standard work. The two tests used were colonoscopy and fecal immunochemical test testing.

Findings

Dramatic improvement in the rates of colorectal screening were achieved. The base rate of documented CRC screening was 22 percent, with the rate two years later being 62.7 percent.

Originality/value

This work is of interest to those working in primary care, gastroenterology, general surgery, or if interested in designing standard work.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

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Book part
Publication date: 2 October 2003

Walter C Borman, Jerry W Hedge, Kerri L Ferstl, Jennifer D Kaufman, William L Farmer and Ronald M Bearden

This chapter provides a contemporary view of state-of-the science research and thinking done in the areas of selection and classification. It takes as a starting point the…

Abstract

This chapter provides a contemporary view of state-of-the science research and thinking done in the areas of selection and classification. It takes as a starting point the observation that the world of work is undergoing important changes that are likely to result in different occupational and organizational structures. In this context, we review recent research on criteria, especially models of job performance, followed by sections on predictors, including ability, personality, vocational interests, biodata, and situational judgment tests. The paper also discusses person-organization fit models, as alternatives or complements to the traditional person-job fit paradigm.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-174-3

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Gary Hunter, Randy Vander Wal, Laura Evans, Jennifer Xu, Gordon Berger, Michael Kullis and Azlin Biaggi‐Labiosa

The development of chemical sensors based on nanostructures, such as nanotubes or nanowires, depends on the capability to reproducibly control the processing of the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The development of chemical sensors based on nanostructures, such as nanotubes or nanowires, depends on the capability to reproducibly control the processing of the sensor. Alignment and consistent electrical contact of nanostructures on a microsensor platform is challenging. This can be accomplished using labor‐intensive approaches, specialized processing technology, or growth of nanostructures in situ. However, the use of standard microfabrication techniques for fabricating nanostructured microsensors is problematic. The purpose of this paper is to address this challenge using standard photoresist processing combined with dielectrophoresis.

Design/methodology/approach

Nanostructures are suspended in photoresist and aligned between opposing sawtooth electrode patterns using an alternating current (AC) electric field (dielectrophoresis). The use of photoresist processing techniques allow the burying of the nanostructures between layers of metal, thus improving the electrical contact of the nanostructures to the microsensor platform.

Findings

This approach is demonstrated for both multi‐walled carbon nanotubes and tin oxide nanowires. Preliminary data show the electrical continuity of the sensor structure as well as the response to various gases.

Research limitations/implications

It is concluded that this approach demonstrates a foundation for a new tool for the fabrication of microsensors using nanostructures, and can be expanded towards enabling the combination of common microfabrication techniques with nanostructured sensor development.

Originality/value

This approach is intended to address the significant barriers of deposition control, contact robustness, and simplified processing to realizing the potential of nanotechnology as applied to sensors.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 11 February 2019

Md. Tofael Hossain Majumder, Xiaojing Li, Aklima Akter and Munni Begum

This paper aims to investigate how the corporate attributes, namely, company size, age, leverage, profitability and ownership concentration, are associated with corporate…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how the corporate attributes, namely, company size, age, leverage, profitability and ownership concentration, are associated with corporate social disclosures (CSD). The paper further examines whether there are any moderating effects on the association because of different proxies of corporate attributes.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses 35 articles published between 1996 and 2016 for finding out the integrated results of the previous studies. The study uses the meta-analysis technique developed by Hunter et al. (1982) and Hunter and Schmidt (1990).

Findings

The findings of the overall meta-analysis show that company size and ownership concentration are significantly and positively associated with CSD, while age, profitability and leverage indicate an insignificant positive association. Also, the different proxies of explanatory variables moderate the association between corporate attributes and CSD.

Originality/value

This is a unique study that determines the association between corporate attributes and CSD by using meta-analysis. Therefore, it is expected that this investigation solves the inconclusive and mixed results of the prior studies and assists future researchers to develop a theory in that context.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 61 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Jennifer P. Bott, Daniel J. Svyantek, Scott A. Goodman and David S. Bernal

This study examines the role of personality and work experience in predicting two measures of job performance: Proficiency on the job tasks assigned to employees (task…

Abstract

This study examines the role of personality and work experience in predicting two measures of job performance: Proficiency on the job tasks assigned to employees (task performance) and discretionary behaviors (e.g., helping) that may or may not be performed by employees (contextual performance). The two types of performance measures were shown to have different patterns of association with work experience and personality dimensions, such that personality was more predictive of contextual performance, while job experience was more predictive of task‐based performance. Noticeably, conscientiousness did not predict task‐based performance. Implications and limitations of the present study, as well as directions for future research, are discussed.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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