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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2009

Philip Law and Jennifer Hung

Entrepreneurship plays a key role in society and is important for economic growth. Despite prior studies of entrepreneurial behavior, no research has been conducted to…

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1485

Abstract

Purpose

Entrepreneurship plays a key role in society and is important for economic growth. Despite prior studies of entrepreneurial behavior, no research has been conducted to examine the influence of monetary and personality factors on the entrepreneurial start up of Certified Public Accountant (CPA) firms in Hong Kong. The purpose of this paper is to investigate into factors influencing Hong Kong CPAs in becoming entrepreneurial public practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are collected through a questionnaire survey and analyzed by binomial logistic regression. A total of 212 CPAs of Chinese origin are randomly selected in Hong Kong. Social capital theory derived from the sociology literature is employed for analysing the findings.

Findings

Results indicate that “profit motivation” and “education level” variables have no significant influence on the entrepreneurial start up, and contradict findings in prior literature. Results further reveal that “social networking” and “internal locus of control” variables could positively influence on the entrepreneurial start up of CPA practices. Results support the validity of social capital theory that reveals social networks have values and productive benefits. Gender plays a role in the entrepreneurial start up of CPA practices, with males predominate has entrepreneurs of CPA practices.

Originality/value

This study could add new contributions to the accounting literature on the study of the entrepreneurial start up of CPA practices in Hong Kong. With the booming Hong Kong economy and the vast supports from China's prosperous market, Hong Kong CPAs are more inclined to become entrepreneurs of CPA practices in the long run. Implications of this study could enable accounting bodies and education institutions focusing on CPAs' personality development and education.

Details

Journal of Human Resource Costing & Accounting, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1401-338X

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Case study
Publication date: 14 September 2017

Jan Hilario, Maik Meusel, Walt Pohl and Karl Schmedders

Jennifer McDougall is considering investing in mutual funds for the first time, and has narrowed her options down to three: one that is domiciled in Germany, and two that…

Abstract

Jennifer McDougall is considering investing in mutual funds for the first time, and has narrowed her options down to three: one that is domiciled in Germany, and two that are domiciled in Luxembourg. As a cautious and risk-averse investor, Jennifer has done extensive research on the three funds, and has come across a curious fact: the beta of the German fund is surprisingly low. After speaking to her financial planner, she learns there is no legal requirement in Germany for mutual funds to compute net asset values at a particular time of the day. If the German fund is closing its books in the middle of the day and its net asset values reflect its midday holdings, rather than end-of-day holdings, this could explain the low beta. Thus, the German fund might appear less risky, without actually being so. Jennifer needed to get a clearer picture of what was going on before making her decision.

Using the data provided with the case, students will determine the closing time of the three funds and how that affects the beta of each. Then they must make a recommendation about which fund would be the best investment for Jennifer.

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

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486

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Business is riddled with bad bosses. Some are greedy, egotistical or corrupt, some merely ineffective or incompetent, while others display inappropriate behavior towards employees. So what can be done about it?

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to digest format.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Ann Arnof Fishman

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how generational differences impact America’s workforce as it changes and to provide strategies for companies to address aging…

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6033

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how generational differences impact America’s workforce as it changes and to provide strategies for companies to address aging Millennials (born 1982-2000), Generation X (born 1961-1981) and Baby Boomers (born 1943-1960).

Design/methodology/approach

The author's approach was based on research on behalf of the US Senate Special Committee on Aging; insights and expertise from her 20 years at the helm of Generational Targeted Marketing, LLC; her teaching at New York University; her experience working with clients and organizations in a wide range of diverse industries; and the insights from her book Marketing to the Millennial Woman.

Findings

Every generation is unique. Practitioners, employers and managers of human resources (HR) who understand and respect the differences between Millennials, Generation X and Baby Boomers can develop strategies from a generational point of view and thereby enable these employees to perform at their peak regardless of age.

Research limitations/implications

Practical examples are given for HR practices in employee retention, benefits, performance management and review, work-life balance, digital and technology applications and for meaningful corporate outreaches.

Originality/value

This tried and true approach to dealing with distinct generations in the workplace leads to increased employee motivation and satisfaction, so that employees not only remain longer at a job but also are eager and happy to report to work each day; they are more productive; and the company’s bottom line benefits as a result.

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Article
Publication date: 19 May 2020

Jui-Long Hung, Kerry Rice, Jennifer Kepka and Juan Yang

For studies in educational data mining or learning Analytics, the prediction of student’s performance or early warning is one of the most popular research topics. However…

Abstract

Purpose

For studies in educational data mining or learning Analytics, the prediction of student’s performance or early warning is one of the most popular research topics. However, research gaps indicate a paucity of research using machine learning and deep learning (DL) models in predictive analytics that include both behaviors and text analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

This study combined behavioral data and discussion board content to construct early warning models with machine learning and DL algorithms. In total, 680 course sections, 12,869 students and 14,951,368 logs were collected from a K-12 virtual school in the USA. Three rounds of experiments were conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

Findings

The DL model performed better than machine learning models and was able to capture 51% of at-risk students in the eighth week with 86.8% overall accuracy. The combination of behavioral and textual data further improved the model’s performance in both recall and accuracy rates. The total word count is a more general indicator than the textual content feature. Successful students showed more words in analytic, and at-risk students showed more words in authentic when text was imported into a linguistic function word analysis tool. The balanced threshold was 0.315, which can capture up to 59% of at-risk students.

Originality/value

The results of this exploratory study indicate that the use of student behaviors and text in a DL approach may improve the predictive power of identifying at-risk learners early enough in the learning process to allow for interventions that can change the course of their trajectory.

Details

Information Discovery and Delivery, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6247

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

Josephine Csete and Jennifer Evans

The paper aims to focus on institutional initiatives to embed e‐learning in a university in Hong Kong, from 2006‐12, through large‐scale funding of 43 e‐learning projects…

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1200

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to focus on institutional initiatives to embed e‐learning in a university in Hong Kong, from 2006‐12, through large‐scale funding of 43 e‐learning projects. It outlines the guiding principles behind the university's e‐learning development and discusses the significance of various procedures and practices in project planning, development and implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

This longitudinal study combines historical perspectives with process description, analysis and personal observations. Its approach is based in action research. The authors are engaged both as participants/learning designers in particular projects and in management, administration and evaluation of the projects at the institutional level.

Findings

It is proposed that e‐learning projects need careful planning, scaffolding and managing. Also that piloting, evaluation and formal reporting as well as the availability of professional, technical and instructional design support are significant factors in success.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is preliminary work. Further findings and analysis are expected at the final completion of all projects. A wealth of data is available in accumulated project documentation and reports, including individual project evaluations with quantitative and qualitative data.

Originality/value

Given the commonly acknowledged difficulties in helping e‐learning projects continue to completion and actually be implemented, this study can offer strategies that may be widely applied in different contexts. The scale and timeframe of the study and the amount of funding available in one institution are unusual so emerging implications are potentially significant.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Book part
Publication date: 18 January 2002

Kate Follett

Abstract

Details

Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-851-4

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Penghe Chen, Shubhabrata Sen, Hung Keng Pung, Wenwei Xue and Wai Choong Wong

The rapid proliferation of mobile context aware applications has resulted in an increased research interest towards developing specialized context data management…

Abstract

Purpose

The rapid proliferation of mobile context aware applications has resulted in an increased research interest towards developing specialized context data management strategies for mobile entities. The purpose of this paper is to aim to develop a new way to model mobile entities and manage their contexts accordingly.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper proposes the concept of “Mobile Space” to model mobile entities and presents strategies to manage the various contexts associated therein. To handle availability related issues, two system services are designed: the “Availability Updating Service” which is an identifier based mechanism and is designed to keep track of mobile objects and handle availability related issues, and the “Application Callback Service” which is a publish/subscribe based mechanism to handle application disruptions and interruptions arising due to mobility.

Findings

The paper presents a detailed study of the proposed framework and a description of the underlying services and the components therein to validate the framework. Experimental results carried out in WiFi and 3G environments indicate that the proposed techniques can support mobile applications and minimize application disruptions with minimal overhead.

Originality/value

The proposed context management framework is generic in nature and is not designed for a specific class of applications. Any mobile context aware application can leverage on the framework and utilize the provided functionalities to manage application disruptions. Also, the decoupling of mobile application layer and the underlying context data management layer renders context data management layer transparent to the application design.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

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Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2004

Denise A Copelton

In 1920 Margaret Sanger called voluntary motherhood “the key to the temple of liberty” and noted that women were “rising in fundamental revolt” to claim their right to…

Abstract

In 1920 Margaret Sanger called voluntary motherhood “the key to the temple of liberty” and noted that women were “rising in fundamental revolt” to claim their right to determine their own reproductive fate (Rothman, 2000, p. 73). Decades later Barbara Katz Rothman reflected on the social, political and legal changes produced by reproductive-rights feminists since that time. She wrote: So the reproductive-rights feminists of the 1970s won, and abortion is available – just as the reproductive-rights feminists of the 1920s won, and contraception is available. But in another sense, we did not win. We did not win, could not win, because Sanger was right. What we really wanted was the fundamental revolt, the “key to the temple of liberty.” A doctor’s fitting for a diaphragm, or a clinic appointment for an abortion, is not the revolution. It is not even a woman-centered approach to reproduction (2000, p. 79).

Details

Gendered Perspectives on Reproduction and Sexuality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-088-3

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Article
Publication date: 26 February 2019

Ana Luisa Santos, Filipa Barros and António Azevedo

Beyond traditional brand endorsement, many celebrities have in recent years decided to launch their own product lines, which may be used to promote their own celebrity…

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1651

Abstract

Purpose

Beyond traditional brand endorsement, many celebrities have in recent years decided to launch their own product lines, which may be used to promote their own celebrity brand. Which product categories or social causes match a celebrity’s brand personality? This study aims to investigate the antecedents of celebrity–product degree of fit and willingness to pay (WTP)/make a donation in different scenarios. The manipulation of the scenarios aims to capture the role of celebrity attributes, perceived personality profiles, product involvement and acceptance of social causes.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 335 respondents answered an online questionnaire with a factorial plan corresponding to 20 different matching scenarios: five celebrities/perceived personalities (Emma Watson, Jennifer Lawrence, Kim Kardashian, Natalie Portman and Scarlet Johansson) × four types of branding scenarios (a lipstick for low involvement; a watch for high involvement; an eco-foundation for “high social acceptance” and vodka for “low social acceptance/controversial”).

Findings

Scarlett Johansson obtained the highest degree of fit, both for launching her own brand of lipstick or a watch. Kim Kardashian had the best degree of fit for launching her own vodka brand, while Emma Watson’s attributes confirmed that she would be seen as the ideal founder of an eco-foundation. Significant predictors of WTP/make a donation were assessed by multiple linear regression for each type of product.

Practical implications

The paper provides recommendations that may help guide celebrity brand managers through the celebrity–product matching process.

Social implications

Celebrity branding in relation to social causes is also discussed in this paper.

Originality/value

This study explores a gap found in the literature as it explores the product match-up hypotheses within a celebrity branding context and moreover extends this investigation to social causes and products with different degrees of involvement and social acceptance.

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