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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2016

Jennifer D. Chandler and Steven Chen

The purpose of this paper is to examine how practices influence service systems.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how practices influence service systems.

Design/methodology/approach

Data across three service contexts (crafts, healthcare and fitness) were collected through depth interviews and netnographic analysis, and analyzed with a two-study multi-method approach focusing first on the micro- (individual) level and then on the macro- (network) level of service systems. Study 1 focused on a micro-level analysis using qualitative techniques (Spiggle, 1994). Study 2 focused on a macro-level analysis using partial least squares regression.

Findings

The results illustrate how practices can change service systems. This occurs when a nuanced practice (i.e. a practice style) orders and roots a service system in a specific form of value creation. The findings reveal four practice styles: individual-extant, social-extant, individual-modified and social-modified practice styles. These practice styles shift in response to event triggers and change service systems. These event triggers are: service beneficiary enhancement, service beneficiary failure, service provider failure and social change. Thus, the findings show that practices – when shifting in response to event triggers – change service systems. This transpires in the understudied meta-layer of a service system.

Practical implications

The study identifies four practice styles that can serve as the basis for segmentation and service design.

Originality/value

Service systems are dynamic and ever changing. This study explores how service systems change by proposing a practice approach to service systems.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2018

Jennifer D. Chandler, Rommel Salvador and Yuna Kim

As a social media platform, Twitter enables direct, continuous and real-time communication across many markets simultaneously. Drawing on speech act theory (SAT), this…

Abstract

Purpose

As a social media platform, Twitter enables direct, continuous and real-time communication across many markets simultaneously. Drawing on speech act theory (SAT), this study aims to view tweets as “speech acts” and explores whether language and brand on Twitter influence firm value.

Design/methodology/approach

The frequency of two language types (accommodative and defensive) used on four corporate Twitter accounts for Sony and Microsoft was observed during the product launch periods of PlayStation 4 and Xbox One, respectively, covering 5,056 tweets. A linear mixed model was used to analyze whether language and brand influence firm value.

Findings

Results show that accommodative language used by firms on their corporate Twitter accounts has an overall negative influence on firm value the following day, whereas the use of defensive language has a positive influence. Moreover, the effects of these language types on firm value are attenuated when the Twitter accounts are personal, compared to the brand accounts.

Research limitations/implications

This study focuses on one type of social media platform (Twitter) and one product category (video game consoles). Future studies should investigate other platforms and product categories to improve generalizability.

Practical implications

Managers should carefully strategize their use of Twitter, especially the use of language and account type, as they can significantly affect firm value.

Originality/value

This study applies SAT to explain how language and brand on Twitter can influence firm value.

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Jennifer Chandler and Steven Chen

The purpose of this paper is to, first, make explicit the theoretical link between prosumers and co-creation as articulated in the service-dominant logic framework. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to, first, make explicit the theoretical link between prosumers and co-creation as articulated in the service-dominant logic framework. The authors re-examine the contributions of prosumers to service experiences with the intent of clarifying how prosumers act as co-creators of value. The second purpose of this study is to clarify the underlying motivations for prosumers’ participation in co-creation/service experiences. The authors assert that high-quality service experiences require service researchers and managers to better understand prosumers and their motivations.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a qualitative investigation, the authors examine prosumers and their social motivations – from a service experience perspective.

Findings

The findings illustrate that prosumers are not only participants in the co-creation of value; the findings illustrate that prosumers are active designers of service experiences. This is because prosumers are motivated by both individual and social factors that arise from their personal lives, not necessarily by desires to participate in firms’ production processes. The authors seek answers to the following research questions: What are the social motivations of prosumers? How do prosumers co-create value through creative outputs?

Research limitations/implications

The findings suggest that firms do not solely motivate co-creation and, more specifically, prosumption; rather, these are motivated by factors in the personal lives of consumers.

Practical implications

The findings illustrate that prosumers are not only participants in the co-creation of value; the findings illustrate that prosumers are active designers of service experiences. Service design and management should account for and accommodate prosumers.

Originality/value

This interdisciplinary paper integrates literature from design, marketing, service, and management to provide theoretical underpinnings of a qualitative study into the social motivations of prosumers from a service experience perspective.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 16 April 2012

Jennifer D. Chandler and Wes Johnston

This chapter reviews emergent research streams as a basis for a dynamic multilevel perspective on organizational buying behavior that can link seminal studies to more…

Abstract

This chapter reviews emergent research streams as a basis for a dynamic multilevel perspective on organizational buying behavior that can link seminal studies to more contemporary issues raised by managers and scholars alike. Since Johnston and Lewin's (1996) review, the literature does not include a comprehensive analysis of recent themes or general directions. From a managerial perspective, some of these issues that need coverage include the following questions. What are the best practices for integrating the organizational buying process with product design, development, and innovation? How can technology, media, and automation be leveraged in the buying process? For supplier relationships in which trust and commitment have been established, what are the best practices for using this to build competitive advantage? What are the best practices for leveraging the brands of products or services that are not owned by a firm? What are the best practices for managing buying processes across international markets?

Details

Business-to-Business Marketing Management: Strategies, Cases, and Solutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-576-1

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Abstract

Details

Global and Culturally Diverse Leaders and Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-495-0

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Book part
Publication date: 31 October 2017

Abstract

Details

Global and Culturally Diverse Leaders and Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-495-0

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Book part
Publication date: 25 June 2012

Abstract

Details

Special Issue – Toward a Better Understanding of the Role of Value in Markets and Marketing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-913-4

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Book part
Publication date: 16 April 2012

Abstract

Details

Business-to-Business Marketing Management: Strategies, Cases, and Solutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-576-1

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Book part
Publication date: 16 April 2012

Mark S. Glynn and Arch G. Woodside

Following this introduction, the Chapter 2, “A Note on Knowledge Development in Marketing,” by Amjad Hajikhani and Peter LaPlaca, examines four themes in the development…

Abstract

Following this introduction, the Chapter 2, “A Note on Knowledge Development in Marketing,” by Amjad Hajikhani and Peter LaPlaca, examines four themes in the development of marketing management knowledge. The discussion initially considers the scientific basis for the marketing discipline, then the academic divide between academic researchers and marketing managers.

Details

Business-to-Business Marketing Management: Strategies, Cases, and Solutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-576-1

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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