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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Jim Aukett, Jennifer Bennett and Geoff Stevens

A quality assurance programme was introduced to the Community Dentistry Department in 1985 as part of a district‐wide quality assurance initiative. The planning and…

Abstract

A quality assurance programme was introduced to the Community Dentistry Department in 1985 as part of a district‐wide quality assurance initiative. The planning and introduction of the programme are described, as well as the development of appropriate standards and the mechanism of voluntary peer review which have evolved, the amount of time which has been needed to establish these programmes is indicated. Several figures, checklists and tables are presented which may be helpful to managers as a starting point, to enable their staff to consider the issues involved in introducing, implementing and monitoring a quality assurance programme in community dentistry services.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Kieran Walshe, Cynthia Lyons, James Coles and Jennifer Bennett

CASPE Research and Brighton Health Authority have been working together to test a series of approaches to quality assurance in healthcare. In this paper, they give an…

109

Abstract

CASPE Research and Brighton Health Authority have been working together to test a series of approaches to quality assurance in healthcare. In this paper, they give an account of the results of the quality assurance techniques used; discuss the key requirements for successful quality assurance in the NHS environment; and consider the need for systematic evaluation of quality assurance programmes.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

Nicholas O’Shaughnessy

Has political marketing been over‐marketed? This article – taking a definition of political marketing that (controversially) excludes news management and “spin” control …

18421

Abstract

Has political marketing been over‐marketed? This article – taking a definition of political marketing that (controversially) excludes news management and “spin” control – does not seek to “prove” that it has, merely to suggest that the impact of marketing in politics is not directly analogous to its effectiveness in business because of differences between a business context and a political one. We argue specifically that political marketing programmes can sometimes do harm, and two case studies – from Canada and Britain – are examined to illuminate this. The claim is that marketing is thus less relevant in politics, both at the level of description and prescription. The broader aim of the article is to sensitise students and researchers alike to the differences in commercial and political contexts, differences of which practitioners must be aware if they are to utilise political marketing to its best advantage.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 35 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Hannah Patrick and Jennifer Bennett

Describes a questionnaire sent to 11 of the 66 nursing homes in theBrighton Health Authority to compare the quality of care provided. Thesehomes care for 242 patients…

854

Abstract

Describes a questionnaire sent to 11 of the 66 nursing homes in the Brighton Health Authority to compare the quality of care provided. These homes care for 242 patients (representing 13 per cent of the 1,728 places in Brighton nursing homes). Questions dealt with residential environment, occupational health, care and control of medicines, clerical services, procedures for prevention and control of infection, etc. Results are discussed and recommendations for further improvements made.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Kieran Walshe, Jennifer Bennett and David Ingram

Adverse event monitoring is a problem‐oriented approach to clinicalaudit and health‐care quality improvement, which was developed and hasbeen widely used in the USA…

709

Abstract

Adverse event monitoring is a problem‐oriented approach to clinical audit and health‐care quality improvement, which was developed and has been widely used in the USA. Briefly explores the technique itself and its evolution. Presents experience gained from the widespread use of the approach in a British acute hospital, and results from one specialty – ophthalmology. Suggests that the study of adverse events in patient care can produce significant improvements in patients’ care, that it is particularly suited to some specialties, and that it should be used alongside other techniques in hospital clinical audit programmes. Concludes that, as the demand for quality‐monitoring information from purchasers and within providers grows, adverse event monitoring may become one of the key techniques for quality assessment and improvement.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Book part
Publication date: 2 May 2006

The editors of this volume would like to thank the authors whose contributions to this area have broken new ground for human considerations in a system that is often…

Abstract

The editors of this volume would like to thank the authors whose contributions to this area have broken new ground for human considerations in a system that is often mistaken as unmanned. We would also like to thank the attendees of our two workshops on human factors of UAVs who shared their insights and scientific accomplishments with us as well as for those from the development community who conveyed to us the constraints and needs of their community. Thanks also to the sponsors of these workshops who include the Air Force Research Laboratory, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, NASA, US Positioning, FAA, and Microanalysis and Design. We also thank the many individuals including Leah Rowe, Jennifer Winner, Jamie Gorman, Preston Kiekel, Amanda Taylor, Dee Andrews, Pat Fitzgerald, Ben Schaub, Steve Shope, and Wink Bennett who provided their valuable time and energy to assist with the workshops and this book. Last but not least, we wish to thank ROV operators, those who have attended our workshops, those who we have come to know only through anecdotes, and those who we will never know. It is this group that truly inspired the workshops and the book. We dedicate this effort to them.

Details

Human Factors of Remotely Operated Vehicles
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-247-4

Book part
Publication date: 22 December 2017

Thomas V. Maher and Jennifer Earl

Growing interest in the use of digital technologies and a Putnam-inspired debate about youth engagement has drawn researchers from outside of the study of social movements…

Abstract

Growing interest in the use of digital technologies and a Putnam-inspired debate about youth engagement has drawn researchers from outside of the study of social movements into research on the topic. This interest in youth protest participation has, in turn, developed into a substantial area of research of its own. While offering important research contributions, we argue that these areas of scholarship are often not well grounded in classic social movement theory and research, instead focusing on new media and/or the relationship between activism and other forms of youth engagement. This chapter seeks to correct this by drawing on interviews with 40 high school and college students from a moderately sized southwestern city to examine whether traditional paths to youth activism (i.e., family, friends, and institutions) have changed or eroded as online technology use and extra-institutional engagement among youth has risen. We find that youth continue to be mobilized by supportive family, friends, and institutional opportunities, and that the students who were least engaged are missing these vital support networks. Thus, it is not so much that the process driving youth activism has changed, but that some youth are not receiving support that has been traditionally necessary to spur activism. This offers an important reminder for scholars studying youth and digital activism and youth participation more broadly that existing theory and research about traditional pathways to activism needs to be evaluated in contemporary research.

Details

Social Movements and Media
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-098-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2019

Sophie Hennekam, Sally Macarthur, Dawn Bennett, Cat Hope and Talisha Goh

The purpose of this paper is to examine women composers’ use of online communities of practice (CoP) to negotiate the traditionally masculine space of music composition…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine women composers’ use of online communities of practice (CoP) to negotiate the traditionally masculine space of music composition while operating outside its hierarchical structures.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employed a mixed methods approach consisting of an online survey (n=225) followed by 27 semi-structured in-depth interviews with female composers to explore the concept and use of CoP. Content analysis was used to analyze the survey responses and interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to interpret respondents’ lived experiences as relayed in the interviews.

Findings

The findings reveal that the online environment can be a supportive and safe space for female composers to connect with others and find support, feedback and mentorship, increase their visibility and develop career agency through learning and knowledge acquisition. CoP emerged as an alternative approach to career development for practicing female music workers and as a tool which could circumvent some of the enduring gendered challenges.

Originality/value

The findings suggest that online CoP can have a positive impact on the career development and sustainability of women in male-dominated sectors such as composition.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2020

Jennifer Elfenbein

Problematic attributes of providing development aid in International Service-Learning (ISL) placements exist with its paternalistic implications. Broadening the discussion…

Abstract

Problematic attributes of providing development aid in International Service-Learning (ISL) placements exist with its paternalistic implications. Broadening the discussion of ISL by shifting the focus toward prioritizing the incorporation of goals of cross-cultural learning and fostering cultural humility addresses these problematic attributes. Approaching ISL placements with a learning mindset inverts the service-learning model by emphasizing learning over helping. Additionally, cultivating a deeper self-awareness and learning from the host communities prior to offering service encourages cultural humility, enhances the ability to remain open to different perspectives, and sustains engagement as a lifelong learner. A framework for developing international education experiences with a systems-oriented approach is proposed: one that acknowledges the interdependent relationships with others in global social and economic structures. The proposed framework applies Milton Bennett’s Developmental Model of Intercultural Sensitivity and Vanessa de Oliveira Andreotti’s HEADS UP educational tool for critical engagement in global social justice issues. Transformative learning theory guides the process of perspective transformation and invites students to critically reflect on their own values, assumptions, and cultural beliefs. The intent is to establish a model for ISL placements which invites respectful collaboration across cultural differences and imbalances in power relations.

Details

Improving Classroom Engagement and International Development Programs: International Perspectives on Humanizing Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-473-6

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 18 January 2021

Sheila Bennett, Tiffany L. Gallagher, Monique Somma, Rebecca White and Kathy Wlodarczyk

This work explores the effectiveness of an innovative inclusion model that is based on the development and operationalization of the inclusion coach (IC) role in one…

Abstract

This work explores the effectiveness of an innovative inclusion model that is based on the development and operationalization of the inclusion coach (IC) role in one school district (in Ontario, generally referred to as a ‘board’). This model has implications for school systems that desire a change in practice but may perceive challenges to this change in their local capacity. In this model, internal school district funding and existing structures were reallocated to convert teaching positions into IC positions. This staffing change was designed to support the desegregation of stand-alone special education classes at the elementary and secondary levels within that school district. While significantly decreasing the number of segregated settings, the intervention was not without its challenges. Challenges and successes will be examined through the perspectives of school principals, ICs and classroom teachers. This school district created an effective and sustainable model to promote inclusion, through internal staffing adjustments, and role redefinition. Utilizing a shared focus and support for staff, this school district was successfully able to transition beliefs and practices from segregated special education to full inclusion for students with special education needs.

Details

Resourcing Inclusive Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-456-1

Keywords

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