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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

Jennifer Barrett, Hilary Caldicott and Trevor De Sain

This article describes a shared ownership scheme developed by Advance Housing and Support so that people who have experienced mental health difficulties could have the…

Abstract

This article describes a shared ownership scheme developed by Advance Housing and Support so that people who have experienced mental health difficulties could have the choice to own their own home. Jennifer Barrett, Hilary Caldicott and Trevor Sasar De Sain have all been involved in Own Home ‐ one as the project manager and the other two as shared owners with the scheme ‐ and here describe what it was like from the inside, what worked and what didn't, and the impact of housing on people's experience of social exclusion and the accompanying loss of hope

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

Article
Publication date: 26 April 2013

Jennifer Barrett, Jack Goulding and Pamela Qualter

The purpose of this paper is to present the extant literature relating to the social processes of innovation in built environment design teams. The paper connects the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the extant literature relating to the social processes of innovation in built environment design teams. The paper connects the relevant and significant work in the field of social psychology and architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) to derive a theoretical framework which can be used to direct further research, towards development of the behavioural facet of design management.

Design/methodology/approach

First, the paper establishes which aspects of social processes of innovation are already present within the AEC field and examine concepts/ideas in social psychology that are likely to be important in understanding group processes within AEC, applying three emergent themes of social climate; risk attitudes and motivation and reward. Second, the paper identifies which elements of social psychology may be used to expand, consolidate and develop our understanding and identify gaps in AEC specific knowledge.

Findings

The paper suggests that whilst the AEC literature has supplanted some key elements of social psychology, this discipline offers a further and significant theoretical resource. However, whilst some aspects of social climate and motivation/reward are well‐represented in the AEC field, these have not yet been fully explored. Furthermore, how collective attitudes to risk can influence design decision‐making is identified as having a limited presence.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to bring together the two disciplines of AEC and social psychology to examine the social aspects of innovative design performance in built environment teams. The paper fulfils an identified need to examine the social processes that influence innovative design performance in construction

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Coral Houtman, Maureen Thomas and Jennifer Barrett

The purpose of this paper is to address the advantages of education and training in creating the “Audiovisual/Digital Media Essay” (AV/DME), starting from visual and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the advantages of education and training in creating the “Audiovisual/Digital Media Essay” (AV/DME), starting from visual and cinematic thinking as a way of setting up, developing and concluding an argument.

Design/methodology/approach

Recognising the advantages to education and training of the “AV/DME” this paper explores ways of enabling visually disciplined students to work on film theory within their chosen medium, and to develop arguments incorporating audiovisual sources, using appropriate academic skills. It describes a hands-on BA/MA workshop held at Newport Film School (May 2011) and subsequent initial implementation of an examinable DME. The paper contextualises the issue in the light of practice-led and practice-based research and of parity with written dissertations. Drawing on analysis of in-depth interviews with students and tutors, it makes practical recommendations for how to resource, staff and support the implementation and continuation of the AV/DME and/or dissertation.

Findings

The paper feeds back from both students and staff on the running of an initial AV/DME workshop and finds that the Film School Newport is suited to running the AV/DME and suggests a framework for its support.

Research limitations/implications

The study needs to be followed up when the students complete their full dissertations.

Practical implications

The AV/DME needs sufficient technical and human resources to support student learning.

Originality/value

The paper provides a clear and original framework for teaching, supporting and assessing the AV/DME. This framework can be disseminated beyond the University of Wales Newport, and can be used to teach the AV/DME in further contexts and to wider groups of students.

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2008

This index covers all issues between February 2005 (Volume 9, Issue 1) and November 2008 (Volume 12, Issue 4). Numbers in bold refer to yolume, numbers in brackets refer…

Abstract

This index covers all issues between February 2005 (Volume 9, Issue 1) and November 2008 (Volume 12, Issue 4). Numbers in bold refer to yolume, numbers in brackets refer to issue, with subsequent numbers to pages.

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

Judith Hammond, Adam Pozner and Mee Ng

Abstract

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Barbara Glover and Eric Owen

Reports on the 14th Annual Conference on Computers, Freedom and Privacy, held in Berkeley, California in April 2004. Outlines the themes of the papers presented in the 12…

1457

Abstract

Reports on the 14th Annual Conference on Computers, Freedom and Privacy, held in Berkeley, California in April 2004. Outlines the themes of the papers presented in the 12 plenary sessions.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Andreas Vårheim and Roswitha Skare

In museum research, museums are held as vital in maintaining the public sphere. This scoping review takes stock of the present status of museum–public sphere research by…

Abstract

Purpose

In museum research, museums are held as vital in maintaining the public sphere. This scoping review takes stock of the present status of museum–public sphere research by providing an overview of the existing literature as a point of departure for future research. In short, it maps the research aims, theoretical concepts, research methods and findings within the field and identifies research gaps.

Design/methodology/approach

A scoping review methodology is used to provide a knowledge synthesis of the museum–public sphere literature. This approach is instrumental for researching multi-disciplinary, fragmented or underdeveloped research fields. Reviews can help identify otherwise easily overlooked gaps in the research literature and are an essential tool.

Findings

Overwhelmingly, the published literature consists of case studies, some of which are theoretically ambitious. Still, cases are selected without explicit goals regarding analytical or theoretical generalization, and the studies are not placed within a theory-building framework. Moreover, the museum–public sphere research primarily focuses on museums in the core Anglosphere countries and is conducted by researchers affiliated with institutions in those countries. The museum–community relationship is a common research theme addressing engagement with the public through either visitor participation or community participation.

Originality/value

This is the first published scoping review or systematically conducted review and knowledge synthesis of the museum–public sphere research literature to our knowledge. The article finds and discusses a range of research gaps that need to be addressed theoretically and empirically.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 78 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 June 2019

Simon Chester Evans, Julie Barrett, Neil Mapes, June Hennell, Teresa Atkinson, Jennifer Bray, Claire Garabedian and Chris Russell

The benefits of “green dementia care”, whereby people living with dementia are supported to connect with nature, are increasingly being recognised. Evidence suggests that…

Abstract

Purpose

The benefits of “green dementia care”, whereby people living with dementia are supported to connect with nature, are increasingly being recognised. Evidence suggests that these benefits span physical, emotional and social spheres and can make a significant contribution towards quality of life. However, care settings often present specific challenges to promoting such connections due to a range of factors including risk-averse cultures and environmental limitations. The purpose of this paper is to report on a project that aims to explore the opportunities, benefits, barriers and enablers to interaction with nature for people living with dementia in residential care and extra care housing schemes in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered from 144 responses to an online survey by managers/staff of extra care housing schemes and care homes in the UK. In depth-case studies were carried out at three care homes and three extra care housing schemes, involving interviews with residents, staff and family carers.

Findings

A wide variety of nature-based activities were reported, both outdoor and indoor. Positive benefits reported included improved mood, higher levels of social interaction and increased motivation for residents, and greater job satisfaction for staff. The design and layout of indoor and outdoor spaces is key, in addition to staff who feel enabled to promote connections with nature.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is based on a relatively small research project in which the participants were self-selecting and therefore not necessarily representative.

Practical implications

The paper makes some key recommendations for good practice in green dementia care in extra care housing and care homes.

Social implications

Outdoor activities can promote social interaction for people living with dementia in care settings. The authors’ findings are relevant to the recent policy focus on social prescribing.

Originality/value

The paper makes some key recommendations for good practice in green dementia care in extra care housing and care homes.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 March 2019

Yazan Al-Zain, Lawrence Al-Fandi, Mazen Arafeh, Samar Salim, Shouq Al-Quraini, Aisha Al-Yaseen and Deema Abu Taleb

The purpose of this paper is to use Lean Six Sigma (LSS) to reduce patient waiting time in a Kuwaiti private hospital obstetrics and gynaecology clinic.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use Lean Six Sigma (LSS) to reduce patient waiting time in a Kuwaiti private hospital obstetrics and gynaecology clinic.

Approach

The define, measure, analyse, improve and control methodology was used. The “define” stage involved identifying patients’ needs, system capabilities and project objectives. The “measure” stage assessed the system’s current state through data collection on waiting times. Dunnett’s test, control charts and process capability analysis were used to ensure data accuracy. In the “analyse” stage, an Ishikawa diagram and Pareto chart were constructed, showing that overbooking appointments, doctors’ unscheduled breaks and doctors not arriving on time were the root causes of the problem. The “improve” stage used an Arena simulation model to represent current and improved system status. The proposed solutions were implemented and monitored in the “control” stage.

Findings

A sigma-level improvement of 300 per cent (0.5–2.0) was realized for appointment patients on Saturdays, with a 67 per cent reduction in waiting time. For walk-ins, the sigma level improved by 288 per cent (0.8–3.1), with a 55 per cent reduction in waiting time. For weekday appointments, the sigma level improved by 111 per cent (0.9–1.9), with a 63 per cent reduction in waiting time. For walk-ins, the sigma level improved by 69 per cent (1.6–2.7), with a 46 per cent reduction in waiting time. A cost–benefit analysis estimated the present project value at $656,459, leading to a total of $5,820,319 in savings by 2025.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils the need for process improvement, increasing patients’ satisfaction and hospitals’ profitability using LSS.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2017

Grant Bage and Jane Turner

The primary school in any rural village is a significant and vivid institution. Its classrooms, playground, buses, staffroom, governing body, PTA committee, religious…

Abstract

The primary school in any rural village is a significant and vivid institution. Its classrooms, playground, buses, staffroom, governing body, PTA committee, religious celebrations, educational visits and community events are a focus not just for village pride but for parental and social aspirations and tensions. Village schools are special local spaces, in which the bite is keenly felt of national education policies. They are sources and sites of friendships, rivalries and divisions amongst both children and adults; places where celebrations and disappointments occur on a daily basis; an important local employer and reliant on a range of committed volunteers. Village schools are genuinely lively and dramatic places.

But not in The Archers. The mostly invisible children of Ambridge simply board a bus to Loxley Barrett aged five, then mysteriously alight aged 11 at Borchester Green or the fee-paying Cathedral School. During those primary years Ambridge’s children, parents and listeners seem blissfully unaffected by tests, snow, bullying, crazes, curriculum change, poor teachers, brilliant teaching assistants, academisation, Ofsted inspections, fussy governors, budget crises or any other rural educational reality.

In this chapter we consider why primary education, a topic that dominates the lives and conversations of real village families from all backgrounds, seems to be of such insignificance to the inhabitants of Ambridge?

Details

Custard, Culverts and Cake
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-285-7

Keywords

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