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Article
Publication date: 9 December 2014

Jennifer A. Boisvert and W. Andrew Harrell

There is a gap in the understanding of relationships between socioeconomic status (SES), urban-rural differences, ethnicity and eating disorder symptomatology. This gap has…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a gap in the understanding of relationships between socioeconomic status (SES), urban-rural differences, ethnicity and eating disorder symptomatology. This gap has implications for access to treatment and the effectiveness of treatment. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are presented from a major Canadian survey, analyzing the impact of body mass index (BMI), urban-non-urban residency, income, and ethnicity on eating disorder symptomatology.

Findings

One of the strongest findings is that high income non-White women expressed less eating disorder symptomatology than lower income non-White women.

Research limitations/implications

Future research needs to consider how factors such as urban residency, exposure to Western “thinness” ideals, and income differentials impact non-White women.

Practical implications

Effective treatment of ethnic minority women requires an appreciation of complicated effects of “culture clash,” income and BMI on eating disorder symptomatology.

Originality/value

This study makes a unique contribution to the literature by examining relationships between SES (income) and eating disorder symptomatology in White and non-White Canadian women. The review of the scientific literature on ethnic differences in eating disorder symptomatology revealed a disparity gap in treatment. This disparity may be a by-product of bias and lack of understanding of gender or ethnic/cultural differences by practitioners.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 January 2022

María Lucila Osorio, Edgar Centeno, Jesús Cambra-Fierro and Ernesto del Castillo

Celebrity-branded products constitute a brand extension growing phenomenon. Authenticity may explain why some of these offerings are successful despite low perceived fit, a

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Abstract

Purpose

Celebrity-branded products constitute a brand extension growing phenomenon. Authenticity may explain why some of these offerings are successful despite low perceived fit, a traditional measure for brand extension acceptance. The purpose of this paper is to propose and test a framework based on the meaning transfer model that depicts the effects of brand extension authenticity, brand extension fit and idol attachment on the valuation of such offerings. An exploration of both functional and hedonic extensions is provided to control for product-type variables.

Design/methodology/approach

Scenario-based survey data from a general population (n = 646) was collected and analyzed with ordinary least squares regressions.

Findings

Brand extension authenticity is a significant antecedent of brand extension success in both product types, and brand extension fit is the most relevant antecedent only in functional extensions. Idol attachment exerts less influence than fit and authenticity in the functional extension. However, its relevance considerably improves in the hedonic extension.

Originality/value

A better understanding of consumers’ responses to celebrity brand extensions is essential to the branding literature. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to consider brand extension authenticity as a predictor of celebrity brand extension success and advances our knowledge of consumer behavior in relation to celebrities as brands and their products as brand extensions. The conceptual and empirical relevance of brand extension authenticity is demonstrated, highlighting its predictive power when compared with brand extension fit and idol attachment in a celebrity brand extension model, and a boundary condition related to product typology is uncovered.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Jillian Farquhar and Jennifer Rowley

To explore, through a case study approach, relationship and community development in online consumer communities.

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Abstract

Purpose

To explore, through a case study approach, relationship and community development in online consumer communities.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study‐based analysis of three organizations that are supporting online community creation and development is used as the basis for grounded theory development. Two of these organizations, the Consumers Association, and Emerald Group Publishing Limited, are publishers, and are building on established community. The third case study, Letsbuyit.com seeks to bring together a consumer community in pursuit of the good deals with suppliers. Online communities are analysed in terms of relationships, including the nature and types of relationships, the role of value creation and commitment, customer‐to‐customer interaction, and relationship lifecycles.

Findings

These case studies demonstrate that whilst communication, content and commerce are often associated with consumer online communities, each e‐business needs to develop its own model of community building activities.

Originality/value

Commercial organizations need to translate customer relationships that have been created in traditional business environments into the virtual marketplace, and to use online communities to strengthen these relationships. This paper contributes to the limited empirical research in this area, and provides some models, and an agenda for future research into online consumer communities.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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