Search results

1 – 10 of 25
Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Jennie Beck

1226

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Jennie M. Weiner and Sarah L. Woulfin

The purpose of this paper is to gain insights into how a group of novice principals, all in schools that deployed principles of autonomy as mechanisms for improvement…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain insights into how a group of novice principals, all in schools that deployed principles of autonomy as mechanisms for improvement, conceptualized what the authors label “controlled autonomy” – a condition in which school leaders are expected to both make site-based decisions and be accountable to district oversight. The study aims to support more effective interactions between school and district leaders around controlled autonomy to increase performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Using schema as a framework to guide the inquiry, this paper uses qualitative methods and interviewing in particular to explore the questions of interest. Seven novice principals were each interviewed three times over the year each interview lasting approximately one hour (n=21). Data were analyzed thematically using both inductive and deductive coding techniques.

Findings

Findings show that principals tended to group potential district supports into four categories: operations, instruction, advocacy, and vision and their perceptions regarding the balance between their and the district’s control over activities in each category was dynamic, varied and dependent on views relating to issues as broad as values alignment to perceptions of bureaucratic efficiency.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the small sample size and methodological approach, it may be inappropriate to generalize the findings across all controlled autonomy contexts. Further research in additional settings is encouraged to support the proposed findings.

Practical implications

This paper has a number of implications for districts and school leaders. Among these is the need for districts to better articulate the parameters of controlled autonomy and for school leaders to receive more and more effective training and support to effectively utilize autonomy as a mechanism for reform.

Originality/value

This work fills a gap in the research regarding on how principals conceptualize controlled autonomy or, more specifically, how they view what school autonomy should look like relative to district control and is this paper’s focus. It also provides insights into practice and potential means to enhance a growing, but so far unevenly implemented and under performing reform initiative (i.e. controlled autonomy).

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 55 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 May 2000

Neale R. Chumbler, Marisue Cody, Cornelia K. Beck and Brenda M. Booth

Older adults with memory problems (especially those diagnosed with dementia) consume a great number of health services. However, little is known about the special needs of…

Abstract

Older adults with memory problems (especially those diagnosed with dementia) consume a great number of health services. However, little is known about the special needs of memory-impaired, noninstitutionalized older adults who seek treatment from primary care physicians (PCPs) for memory problems. The study outlined in this chapter investigated the interrelationships among level of education, residence, physical and mental status, and the use of PCPs for memory problems. A probability-based (random-digit dialing) survey of households with individuals more than 60 years of age occurred in six Southern states: Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee (N = 1,368). We developed two multivariate logistic regression models. The first estimated the additive effects of sociodemographic and health status characteristics on the likelihood of service utilization. The second model inserted two multiplicative terms: the “instrumental activities of daily living (IADL)” by “memory impairment” and the “low education” by “memory impairment” interaction terms. Three main findings emerged from the analyses: (1) rural/urban differences in use of PCPs approached statistical significance, (2) for lower educated older adults, the odds of using a PCP declined steadily as their number of memory impairments increased, and (3) as older adults experienced increases in IADL limitations and memory impairments, their likelihood of service use declined. The chapter ends with a discussion on program planning, policy, and practice initiatives in light of the findings.

Details

Health Care Providers, Institutions, and Patients: Changing Patterns of Care Provision and Care Delivery
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-644-2

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1914

No milk to be sold from newly‐calved cows, nor until three days after the calf has been removed.

Abstract

No milk to be sold from newly‐calved cows, nor until three days after the calf has been removed.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2004

Neale R. Chumbler, John Fortney, Marisue Cody and Cornelia Beck

The purpose of the present study is to investigate whether family caregivers with a stronger sense of coherence (SOC) who are caring for community dwelling older adults with…

Abstract

The purpose of the present study is to investigate whether family caregivers with a stronger sense of coherence (SOC) who are caring for community dwelling older adults with cognitive impairment are less likely to use mental health services. An adaptation of the Anderson behavioral model of access to health care was employed as a conceptual framework. Data were collected for 304 impaired older adult/family caregiver dyads. Caregiver mental health service use and sense of coherence were measures as well as predisposing factors (age, gender, race, education, type of familial relationship, family size, and co-residence with impaired family member), enabling factors (self-reported awareness of services, travel times to mental health services, social support, and insurance), and need factors (chronic health conditions and distress). The impaired elder’s age, level of physical impairment, and level of memory impairment were also examined. Logistic regression results indicated that caregivers who have a stronger SOC were less likely to use mental health services (OR=0.91, p=0.006). Other significant independent predictors of mental health service use were social support (OR=0.34, p=0.032) and caregivers aiding family members with higher levels of physical impairment (OR=1.14, p=0.033). The results of this study support clinicians and planners developing mental health services that use SOC to mitigate the detrimental effects of caregiving. Future research is needed to target effective measures to positively manipulate this variable.

Details

Chronic Care, Health Care Systems and Services Integration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-300-6

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 10 May 2000

Abstract

Details

Health Care Providers, Institutions, and Patients: Changing Patterns of Care Provision and Care Delivery
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-644-2

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2008

Alex Hossack, Jennie McCarthy, Elaine McClean and Leslie Serette

This case study illustrates the rehabilitation of a woman who suffered chronic sexual, physical and emotional abuse throughout childhood that resulted in 20 years of secure…

Abstract

This case study illustrates the rehabilitation of a woman who suffered chronic sexual, physical and emotional abuse throughout childhood that resulted in 20 years of secure psychiatric care and a ‘psychopathic personality’ diagnosis. Rehabilitation used a survivor‐orientated approach to resolve symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, institutionalisation and a dysfunctional narrative.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 December 2007

Stephanie L. Ayers, Jennie Jacobs Kronenfeld, Sam S. Kim, Jemima A. Frimpong and Patrick A. Rivers

The purpose of this chapter is to examine geographic variations in utilization and need for mental health services. Data for this study were obtained from the 2002 National Survey…

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to examine geographic variations in utilization and need for mental health services. Data for this study were obtained from the 2002 National Survey of American Families. The total sample size was 23,327 adults of aged 18 years and older. Both logistic and linear regression were used to test the possibility of geographical variations. Disparities were found among the 13 U.S. states examined in this study. Results also showed that the percentage of African Americans, state mental health budgets, and mean length of stay in psychiatric hospitals in the state are important predictors of variations in mental health utilization and need variables. These findings suggest that although individual sociodemographic characteristics are important in examining mental health utilization, state characteristics (especially percentage of African Americans, state mental health laws, and mean length of stay in psychiatric hospitals) are also important predictors of variation in utilization of mental health services.

Details

Inequalities and Disparities in Health Care and Health: Concerns of Patients, Providers and Insurers
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1474-4

Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2004

Abstract

Details

Chronic Care, Health Care Systems and Services Integration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-300-6

Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2004

Abstract

Details

Chronic Care, Health Care Systems and Services Integration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-300-6

1 – 10 of 25