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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2020

Felicity Sedgewick, Jenni Leppanen and Kate Tchanturia

Mental health conditions are known to be more common amongst autistic than non-autistic people. To date, there is little work exploring gender differences in mental health amongst…

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Abstract

Purpose

Mental health conditions are known to be more common amongst autistic than non-autistic people. To date, there is little work exploring gender differences in mental health amongst autistic people and no work including non-binary/trans people. This paper aims to address this gap.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a large-scale online study, with 948 participants between 18 and 81 years old. Participants self-reported autism, anxiety, depression and eating disorder status. Analyses were run examining gender differences in the rates of these conditions in each group.

Findings

Autistic people are more likely to have anxiety and depression than non-autistic people of all genders. Autistic women and non-binary people experienced mental health issues at higher rates than men and at similar rates to each other. Autistic people were twice as likely as non-autistic people to have all eating disorders. Further, gendered patterns of eating disorders seen in the non-autistic population are also present in the autistic population.

Research limitations/implications

There are inherent issues with self-report of diagnoses online, but this study showed that using screening questionnaires is effective.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to look at gender differences in common mental health issues amongst autistic and non-autistic adults. It highlights that there are significant gendered patterns in the prevalence of mental health issues in both the autistic and non-autistic population and that these have an impact for how treatment should be approached to be effective.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 October 2022

Verity Chester and Samuel Tromans

244

Abstract

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

Book part
Publication date: 5 November 2021

Etiënne A. J. A. Rouwette and L. Alberto Franco

This chapter focuses on techniques and technologies to aid groups in making decisions, with an emphasis on computer-based support. Many office workers regularly meet colleagues…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on techniques and technologies to aid groups in making decisions, with an emphasis on computer-based support. Many office workers regularly meet colleagues and clients in virtual meetings using videoconferencing platforms, which enable participants to carry out tasks in a manner similar to a face-to-face meeting. The development of computer-based platforms to facilitate group tasks can be traced back to the 1960s, and while they support group communication, they do not directly support group decision making. In this chapter we distinguish four technologies developed to provide support to group decisions, clustered into two main traditions. Technologies in the task-oriented tradition are mainly concerned with enabling participants to complete tasks to solve the group's decision problem via computer-supported communications. Group Decision Support Systems and social software technologies comprise the task-oriented tradition. Alternately, in the model-driven tradition, participants use computers to build and use a model that acts as a referent to communicate, mostly verbally, about the group's decision problem. System modeling and decision-modeling technologies constitute the model-driven tradition. This chapter sketches the history and guiding ideas of both traditions, and describes their associated technologies. The chapter concludes with questioning if increased availability of online tools will lead to increased use of group decision support technologies, and the differential impact of communication support versus decision support.

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Group and Team Communication Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-501-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 February 2022

Julia A.M. Reif, Katharina G. Kugler, Mariella T. Stockkamp, Selina S. Richter, Valerie M. Benning, Lina A. Muschaweck and Felix C. Brodbeck

Traditional approaches to business processes and their management consider the “people dimension” as an antecedent of process performance. The authors complemented this approach…

Abstract

Purpose

Traditional approaches to business processes and their management consider the “people dimension” as an antecedent of process performance. The authors complemented this approach by considering employees as process perceivers and thus taking an employee-centered perspective on business processes. The authors investigated dimensions of healthy business processes, that is, processes which, while promoting performance, foster employee well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a qualitative dataset and two quantitative studies, the authors developed and validated a scale for healthy business processes, interpreted it from a salutogenic perspective and tested relationships with people and performance outcomes.

Findings

The scale comprises four factors reflecting the three dimensions of the salutogenic concept “sense of coherence”: manageability was represented by the factors process tools and process flexibility; comprehensibility was represented by the factor process description; and meaningfulness was represented by the factor management support. The scale and its subscales were significantly related to people and performance outcomes.

Originality/value

The authors propose that health-oriented business process management and performance-oriented business process management are two components of an integrated business process management that favors neither a functionalist, efficiency-oriented approach nor an employee-oriented approach, but takes both approaches and their interaction equally into account in the sense of person-process fit.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Anna-Liisa Elo, Jenni Ervasti, Eeva Kuosma and Pauliina Mattila-Holappa

Leadership behaviours are shown to contribute to subordinate well-being. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of a 7.5-day personal growth-orientated leadership…

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Abstract

Purpose

Leadership behaviours are shown to contribute to subordinate well-being. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of a 7.5-day personal growth-orientated leadership intervention among line supervisors on subordinate well-being at work in a public sector construction organization.

Design/methodology/approach

A quasi-experimental design was applied to investigate the effects on the subordinates’ perceptions of the psychosocial work environment, leadership, and well-being. The intervention group comprised the subordinates (n=49) of the leadership intervention units and the control group comprised the subordinates (n=96) of the non-participating units. Data were collected with pre- and post-measurement surveys and analysed with repeated measures ANCOVA.

Findings

The intervention improved the flow of information after adjusting for the subordinates’ level of participation in the organizational stress management programme and background variables. The subordinates’ perception of leadership or of their own well-being did not improve compared to the control group.

Research limitations/implications

More detailed and proximal outcome indicators are needed. Several measurements and a process evaluation of the implementation are recommended.

Practical implications

Line supervisors need to be informed about the goals and methods of a personal growth intervention in order to encourage them to meet their strengths and limitations. The improvement of blue-collar subordinate well-being through leadership development might benefit from more practical training approaches.

Originality/value

The personal growth approach to line supervisors’ development is rare. The effect of the development on subordinate well-being has not been investigated.

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