Search results

1 – 2 of 2
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 February 2019

Amy Ragan, Jenna Kammer, Charlene Atkins and Rene Burress

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of library instruction on the use of e-textbook features in a seventh-grade science class in Budapest, Hungary. Using…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of library instruction on the use of e-textbook features in a seventh-grade science class in Budapest, Hungary. Using the theory of value-expectancy, library instruction was designed to show students how the e-textbook features would improve their study habits.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a time-series, within-subject design, the researchers examined the students’ use of e-textbooks before receiving library instruction, and then again after receiving library instruction. Data were collected from student survey responses, focus group interviews, and digital library usage. A repeated-measures t-test was used to compare data collected prior to and following the instructional sessions.

Findings

The results indicate that the use of e-textbook features (glossary, audio, quizzes, notes, highlighter, and video) increased after library instruction. While the use of e-textbook features increased, this did not translate to other types of e-books: the use of the digital library did not increase.

Research limitations/implications

This paper has implications for research on the use of e-textbooks in academic settings. Baseline findings support the existing literature that shows that students do not use all of the features of an e-textbook. The research in this study adds that direct instruction on those features will increase use.

Practical implications

Librarians and teachers may want to consider direct instruction on e-textbooks. While it may not increase digital library usage, it may benefit the student learning experience.

Originality/value

This study builds on the work related to the student experience of using e-textbook. It highlights the value of library instruction in improving the student experience and use of e-textbooks.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 May 2018

Kodjo Atiso, Jenna Kammer and Denice Adkins

This study aims to examine the information needs of Ghanaian immigrants who have settled in Maryland in the USA.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the information needs of Ghanaian immigrants who have settled in Maryland in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an ethnographic approach, immigrants from Ghana shared their information needs, challenges and sources they rely upon for information. In total, 50 Ghanaian immigrants participated in this study.

Findings

Findings indicate that like many immigrant populations, Ghanaians who have immigrated to the USA primarily rely on personal networks, mediated through social media, as their primary sources of information. Despite the availability of immigration resources in the library, Ghanaian immigrants may not view it as a useful resource.

Social implications

While this study examines a single immigrant population, its social implications are important to libraries who aim to serve immigrant populations in their community.

Originality/value

This study provides new information about African immigrant population, a population whose information needs have rarely been covered in the literature.

Details

Information and Learning Science, vol. 119 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

1 – 2 of 2