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Article

Tung-Hsuan Wan, Yun-Shu Hsu, Jehn-Yih Wong and Shin-Hao Liu

Human capital is the most important determinant of the Hospitality industry’s success. Executive chefs should be skilled in both management and culinary arts, in addition…

Abstract

Purpose

Human capital is the most important determinant of the Hospitality industry’s success. Executive chefs should be skilled in both management and culinary arts, in addition to ensuring the success of the entire hospitality division. The study aims to understand the competencies of executive chefs in international tourist hotels in Taiwan.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature review and behavioral event interviews were conducted with ten executive chefs and executive sous chefs. The modified Delphi method verified the results using 15 experts.

Findings

A competency framework was created, with four quadrants – managerial, operational, behaviors and skills – to classify executive chefs’ competencies. Each competency was further divided into sub-competencies – culinary research, emotional control, negotiation skills, job guidance and proactive thinking ability – for 25 items. Quadrants I and II are hard competencies that can be improved through education and training, whereas the third and fourth are soft competencies that require more time for development in workers.

Practical implications

The two-step study developed a competency framework with a practical reference value. The study results could be utilized by human resources managers during their companies’ training, recruitment, selection and promotion.

Originality/value

Besides the Delphi method, a deep behavioral event interview that enabled determining critical competencies was also used to collect data. The results obtained could be used to structure schools’ curricula. Collaborations between the hospitality industry and schools could help develop better curricula and training plans to maximize the availability of educational resources.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article

Jehn-yih Wong, Tung-hsuan Wan and Hung-chih Chen

This study aims to make government usage of technology research grants more efficient and to evaluate how to use university–industry–research cooperation to promote…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to make government usage of technology research grants more efficient and to evaluate how to use university–industry–research cooperation to promote industrial innovation in Taiwan.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study aims to use the triple helix model and other references to develop indicators which can estimate the performance of university–industry–research cooperation in Taiwan. The study selects three facets: “(prior) mechanisms,” “(in-progress) regulations” and “(post-hoc) operations” to find out the critical indicators contributing the final outcome. The study found that a successful university–industry–research cooperation requires the following factors: strengthening review methods for the mechanisms; its relationships of rights and obligations; policy needs in regulations; and plan incentives in operations.

Findings

It is recommended that, to promote university–industry–research cooperation in Taiwan, resource distributors and program management units should not only continue program application incentives and strengthen interdepartmental resource integration, they should also consider the establishment of a fair, just and open review mechanisms, and they should enhance the relationship between the rights and obligations of university–industry–research cooperation.

Originality/value

The study of this program includes application review before, during and after the program, management examination and performance evaluation to formulate recommendations as reference points for resource distributors and grant recipients. And because of industry–university cooperation being the main way of research and technology development, the findings and suggestions of this study may also be helpful for other grant systems in the world.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

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Article

Jo-Hui Lin, Jehn-Yih Wong and Ching-hua Ho

This paper aims to examine a mediating model of work-to-leisure conflict (WLC) based on the job demand-control-support model (JDCS model) and conflict roles of work and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine a mediating model of work-to-leisure conflict (WLC) based on the job demand-control-support model (JDCS model) and conflict roles of work and non-work life. This model proposes that work loading, time-off autonomy and support from supervisors and co-workers are related to WLC and leisure satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 457 frontline employees drawn from within the hospitality and tourism industry completed a study questionnaire. All hypothesized relationships were estimated using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results support a theoretical model in which WLC works as a partial mediator between job stress variables and leisure satisfaction. Findings suggest that low workload and flexible time-off contribute to alleviating WLC and facilitating leisure satisfaction and with the addition of high co-worker support, directly benefit employee leisure satisfaction.

Practical implications

Management implications related to job design and work-related social support are discussed.

Originality/value

The current study contributes to the existing knowledge base by testing WLC as a partial mediator between work loading–leisure satisfaction and time-off autonomy–leisure satisfaction relationships. These findings help human resource management managers broaden their understanding of the role of WLC in balancing frontline employees’ life in work and non-work domains.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article

Yi-Fei Chuang, Shui-Hui Chia and Jehn Yih Wong

The purpose of this study is to provide a data mining approach for classifying Taiwanese healthcare institutions based on customer value assessment. Each institution type…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to provide a data mining approach for classifying Taiwanese healthcare institutions based on customer value assessment. Each institution type has developed its own marketing strategy along with relationship management strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

Real transaction data from 88 pharmaceutical companies were the study samples. Expert interviews were conducted to analyze industry knowledge. The frequency, money, and contract term (FMC) model was developed to assess and segment the healthcare institutions. ANOVA and the Scheffe post-test were used to explore the test effects of each FMC indicator among the groups. The C5.0 decision tree was then used to generate the behavioral rules of various segmentations. Finally, this study combined the related variables with the purchasing behavioral rules to propose specific strategies for each type of healthcare institution.

Findings

A total of 663 health care institutions in Taiwan were divided into four types: loyalist, intellectualist, nitpicking, and churn. The terms frequency (F), money (M) and contract term (C) were all significant indicators for determining the differences among the four customer categories at the 0.01 level of significance. The behavioral rules related to the four categories were determined by using the C5.0 algorithm.

Originality/value

This FMC model can provide a strategic development method for the pharmaceutical industry to conduct market segmentation. The findings may assist pharmaceutical companies provide customized services to health care institutions and to manage their downstream demand effectively.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 113 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Article

Chiayu Tu, Shiuh-Nan Hwang and Jehn-Yih Wong

This research investigates how micro-enterprises cooperate with external parties in order to promote innovation and entrepreneurial success. The purpose of this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

This research investigates how micro-enterprises cooperate with external parties in order to promote innovation and entrepreneurial success. The purpose of this paper is to describe supplier and consumer cooperation and analyzes how these two behavioral modes influence the product and service innovations of micro-enterprises. Based on the resource-based view of the firm, the authors show that micro-enterprises help the source of innovation by tapping into the resources and abilities of suppliers.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used a questionnaire to randomly sample micro-entrepreneurs that run stalls at night markets. Before distributing the final questionnaire, the authors in-depth interviewed ten micro-entrepreneurs and asked them to openly describe their entrepreneurial processes and success stories.

Findings

The results of this study show that cooperation with consumers does not improve product and service innovations. By contrast, the cooperation of micro-enterprises with suppliers was found to increase the generation of product and service innovations in the present study. And the findings show that the effect of innovation approaches on entrepreneurial success indicates that product innovation positively improves firm performance. Last, from the perspective of cooperation behavior, product innovation mediates entrepreneurial success through cooperation with suppliers.

Research limitations/implications

Because of respondents were night market vendors and thus the results are not necessarily generalizable to other types of micro-enterprises. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to test multiple types of micro-enterprises. Second, this research aimed to differentiate the relationships between innovation approaches and entrepreneurial success by focussing exclusively on product and service innovations. Therefore, other variables should be included in future studies.

Practical implications

As for practical implications in the field of cooperation behavior, the authors have shown that it is crucial to maintain long-term cooperative relations with trusted suppliers.

Social implications

As for practical implications in the field of cooperation behavior, the authors have shown that it is crucial to maintain long-term cooperative relations with trusted suppliers.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills an identified need to study how innovation in micro-enterprises.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 52 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article

Yi-Fei Chuang, Shiuh-Nan Hwang, Jehn-Yih Wong and Chun-Der Chen

– The aim of this study is to explore the attractiveness of tourist night markets by looking at the dual nature of retail service and tourism from a supply-side perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to explore the attractiveness of tourist night markets by looking at the dual nature of retail service and tourism from a supply-side perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted field observations to understand the offerings at night markets and used content analysis to explore the attributes of vendors who operate there.

Findings

The research reveals that the attractiveness of night markets derives from the diversity of service contents and local food, affordable consumption (the lowest unit prices, with products under US$3.3 comprising approximately 70 per cent of those offered), temple festivals and the various service attributes of vendors. These night market features generate physical perceptions and personnel perceptions among tourists. Vendor service attributes include performance, empathy, responsiveness and courtesy. Unique and interesting performances comprise a special attribute of night markets that differ from other service industries.

Practical implications

The results provide information on how tourism officials can promote night markets as tourist destinations and what kinds of vendor service attributes please tourists the most.

Originality/value

This study expands on the literature that discusses perceptual attributes to tourist street markets by exploring the service contents of these markets and by identifying the service attributes of vendors.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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Article

Sinead Mellett, Felicity Kelliher and Denis Harrington

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate key criteria underpinning network-facilitated green innovation capability development in micro-firms.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate key criteria underpinning network-facilitated green innovation capability development in micro-firms.

Design/methodology/approach

Micro-firms, those firms with less than ten full-time employees, need to continuously innovate in order to sustain their business in the emerging green economy. This study uses an interpretive multiple case approach to explore micro-firm owner-manager (O/M) green innovation activities, encompassing O/M views on facilitated network engagement in Ireland and Canada over a 12-month period.

Findings

The findings show that proactive implementation of green innovation is influenced by the O/M’s natural environment orientation and the potential for economic gain, while facilitated networks provide an additional resource that the O/M can draw from that allows the O/M to test new ideas, comprehend new and existing legislation and identify potential supports in pursuit of green innovation capability development within the micro-firm.

Research limitations/implications

This study offers a contribution to knowledge in the areas of green innovation, micro-firm capabilities and facilitated network engagement. However, the sample size is small and distance was a challenge, yet data and case protocols are in place which allow for replication of the study. As the research is embedded in the resource and capability theories, alternative theoretical frameworks may shed a different light on the research question.

Originality/value

Prior studies have found that facilitated networks have a positive impact on micro-firm sustainability as these networks enhance the firm’s constrained resource base. The proposed framework can be used as a guideline for support organisations including facilitated networks in assisting micro-firms in reaching their green innovation goals and objectives. It can also be used by micro-firms in the attainment of the green innovation capability.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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