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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Jeffrey T. Resnick

Author Jeff Resnick explores the vulnerability of firms whose executives fail to manage the perceptions of their company – indeed, their corporate reputation – with as…

Abstract

Author Jeff Resnick explores the vulnerability of firms whose executives fail to manage the perceptions of their company – indeed, their corporate reputation – with as much rigor as they apply to managing financial, operational or technology risk. Mr Resnick offers up a snapshot of current attitudes towards managing corporate reputation, including research underscoring CEOs perception that it has become far more important than it was several years ago, and juxtaposes this with data that indicates US investors remain as distrustful of corporate ethics today as they were in the heated moment of corporate scandals. Mr Resnick then presents a provocative case for better managing reputation – a company’s most critical important intangible asset – in a more strategic manner. Finally, he provides readers with steps for effectively monitoring reputational risk. His monitoring system focuses on a multi‐stakeholder measurement approach that more fully informs executives’ decisions concerning their corporate reputation. Critical to making his case, Mr Resnick uses examples from recently completed reputational research, focusing on the electric power industry and conducted by an independent reputation‐rating agency.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Book part
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Anthony R. Hatch, Marik Xavier-Brier, Brandon Attell and Eryn Viscarra

This chapter uses Goffman’s concept of total institutions in a comparative case study approach to explore the role of psychotropic drugs in the process of…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter uses Goffman’s concept of total institutions in a comparative case study approach to explore the role of psychotropic drugs in the process of transinstitutionalization.

Methodology/approach

This chapter interprets psychotropic drug use across four institutionalized contexts in the United States: the active-duty U.S. military, nursing homes and long-term care facilities, state and federal prisons, and the child welfare system.

Findings

This chapter documents a major unintended consequence of transinstitutionalization – the questionable distribution of psychotropics among vulnerable populations. The patterns of psychotropic use we synthesize suggest that total institutions are engaging in ethically and medically questionable practices and that psychotropics are being used to serve the bureaucratic imperatives for social control in the era of transinstitutionalization.

Practical implications

Psychotropic prescribing practices require close surveillance and increased scrutiny in institutional settings in the United States. The flows of mentally ill people through a vast network of total institutions raises questions about the wisdom and unintended consequences of psychotropic distribution to vulnerable populations, despite health policy makers’ efforts regulating their distribution. Medical sociologists must examine trans-institutional power arrangements that converge around the mental health of vulnerable groups.

Originality/value

This is the first synthesis and interpretive review of psychotropic use patterns across institutional systems in the United States. This chapter will be of value to medical sociologists, mental health professionals and administrators, pharmacologists, health system pharmacists, and sociological theorists.

Details

50 Years After Deinstitutionalization: Mental Illness in Contemporary Communities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-403-4

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2016

Robert L. Axtell

Certain elements of Hayek’s work are prominent precursors to the modern field of complex adaptive systems, including his ideas on spontaneous order, his focus on market…

Abstract

Certain elements of Hayek’s work are prominent precursors to the modern field of complex adaptive systems, including his ideas on spontaneous order, his focus on market processes, his contrast between designing and gardening, and his own framing of complex systems. Conceptually, he was well ahead of his time, prescient in his formulation of novel ways to think about economies and societies. Technically, the fact that he did not mathematically formalize most of the notions he developed makes his insights hard to incorporate unambiguously into models. However, because so much of his work is divorced from the simplistic models proffered by early mathematical economics, it stands as fertile ground for complex systems researchers today. I suggest that Austrian economists can create a progressive research program by building models of these Hayekian ideas, and thereby gain traction within the economics profession. Instead of mathematical models the suite of techniques and tools known as agent-based computing seems particularly well-suited to addressing traditional Austrian topics like money, business cycles, coordination, market processes, and so on, while staying faithful to the methodological individualism and bottom-up perspective that underpin the entire school of thought.

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Revisiting Hayek’s Political Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-988-6

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Abstract

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Early Careers in Education: Perspectives for Students and NQTs
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-585-9

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Book part
Publication date: 11 June 2014

Abstract

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Child Labour in Global Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-780-1

Abstract

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History & Crime
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-699-6

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All That's Not Fit to Print
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-361-7

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

D. Matthew Boyer and J. Emerson Smith

The purpose of this paper is to share the authors’ perspectives as members of a research-based course project focused on learning game design and development. The authors…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to share the authors’ perspectives as members of a research-based course project focused on learning game design and development. The authors provide important aspects of their findings as usable knowledge in the form of implications for potential use in new contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a case study of one instance of a course-based structured learning opportunity. The authors chose to interview each other about various aspects of the course structure and its affordances and constraints for creating an effective and supportive learning environment.

Findings

The paper provides findings as implications for potential transfer to new contexts. As considerations for engendering the type of learning the authors promote, they share much of the interview responses in an effort to not only contextualize their perspectives but also identify important aspects for similar projects.

Research limitations/implications

As a single case, the authors focus on areas of transferability rather than generalizability. With more cases, they could build the list of important aspects, but with this individual case, they can simply share the ideas they find most salient from their work.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for those interested in creating similar opportunities that combine undergraduate research projects and coursework to enhance students’ ability to pursue individual interests typically not found in traditional course models.

Originality/value

This paper provides an example of a non-traditional opportunity for learning as a potential model for others.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2011

Fiona Rowe and Donald Stewart

A comprehensive whole‐school approach has emerged as a promising model for building connectedness in the school setting. The health‐promoting school model, through its…

Abstract

Purpose

A comprehensive whole‐school approach has emerged as a promising model for building connectedness in the school setting. The health‐promoting school model, through its whole‐school orientation and attention to the school organizational environment, identifies structures and processes that influence school connectedness. This paper aims to investigate this model.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examines the key mechanisms of health‐promoting school structures and processes, as well as the pathways of their influence on school connectedness, by using a qualitative case study methodology in three school communities in southeast Queensland, Australia. In‐depth interviews, focus groups, observations and documentary evidence provided the data.

Findings

Key elements of the health‐promoting school model that facilitated interactions between school community members were events that were characterised as positive, social, celebratory, and with no financial cost, as well as informal gatherings that involved food or events with communal eating. Through these interactions, mutual reciprocal relationships were developed. School community members began to learn about and understand one another's positive qualities, which in turn promoted additional aspects of school connectedness. The key elements and pathways of the health‐promoting school approach were supported by factors such as informal teaching, reinforcement, adequate time for relationships to develop, and being embedded within the whole‐school orientation. The results of this study are used to formulate a theoretical model of how the health‐promoting school approach builds school connectedness.

Originality/value

These findings are important because they provide insight into the central role of food in the school culture and how it links other key elements and factors that can be implemented in the school setting to build connectedness.

Details

Health Education, vol. 111 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Cindy L Anderton and Elizabeth M King

This study aims to build on Gee’s (2003) earlier question exploring specifically the learning processes associated with broadening cultural empathy and exploring personal…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to build on Gee’s (2003) earlier question exploring specifically the learning processes associated with broadening cultural empathy and exploring personal bias through gameplay in the role-playing game, Oblivion.

Design/methodology/approach

Methodology for this case study (Stake, 1995) was informed by narrative (Reissman, 2001) methods that focused on collecting descriptions of the unique experiences of participants while being engaged in gameplay and their personal reflections synthesizing game-based engagement and course content. “Narrative research offers the possibility of exploring nuances and interrelationships among aspects of experience that the reader might better understand other related situations” (Josselson, p. 239). Our study focused on using narrative research methods to examine embodiment within the fictional world of the game as an experiential participatory-learning experience.

Findings

All participants indicated that the most salient learning experiences of the course was playing the game. The process participants underwent the experience of an event in the game and linked this gaming experience to their personal real-life reaction combined with emotions and thoughts. They then self-reflected on those reactions, which cumulatively contributed to self-reported increased self-awareness in the areas of personal bias, stereotypes, attitudes, values, beliefs and privilege. Three themes were identified from the data, namely, increase or variance in levels of self-awareness, navigating unfamiliar cultural systems and increased understanding and cognitive empathy for others. In addition, a fourth additional theme of embodiment and the value of embodiment were identified.

Research limitations/implications

Lacking in the findings were reports by participants regarding application of skills to different cultural populations. Future research will focus on how integration of application of skills can be facilitated using similar pedagogical practices. Because this study included a small number of participants who were counseling students in a master’s program, the applicability of the findings to other student populations is limited. Further research would need to determine whether or not the findings could be replicated with other types of students.

Practical implications

Embedding the intervention within the structure of a course appeared to provide a supportive and safe space for experiencing embodied selves, it also provided a mode for performing their future selves for and with colleagues experiencing similar situations. In this way, they were able to venture with and among their colleagues toward a fuller understanding of self, and particularly in conjunction to diverse populations. These features of the intervention appeared to work in concert together holistically affording a space where they could be vulnerable enough, open enough, to begin questioning their central thoughts and beliefs and increase their empathy for others who are different.

Social implications

Using the game of Oblivion allowed our students to have an embodied experience in a virtual space where they got to experience being in a completely different culture and experience culture shock. They had to make decisions that forced them to review their belief systems, go against their belief systems, or explore options that were against their belief systems in a safe way with no real-life repercussions. This embodied experience allowed our participants to engage in behaviors that none would dare to do in their real world and provided a comfort zone to explore taboo subjects.

Originality/value

Embedding the game within the curriculum encouraged participants to experience feelings of embodied empathy (Gee, 2010). Oblivion assisted in this process by providing participants the opportunity to gain entry into a unique designed world, a realistic but pseudo-cultural world replete with social and institutional structures both familiar and foreign to their real life. This appeared to provide a realistic manifestation of self, positioning participants toward experiencing embodied empathy for the designed scenarios in the game.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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