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Article
Publication date: 20 December 2019

M. Afzalur Rahim and Jeffrey P. Katz

Previous studies examining the relationship between gender and conflict-management strategies have generally reported weak or inconsistent results. This paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous studies examining the relationship between gender and conflict-management strategies have generally reported weak or inconsistent results. This paper aims to study extends past research by examining the main and interactive effects of gender on conflict-management strategies over time. The authors propose that conflict-management strategies commonly employed in the workplace are impacted by worker gender as predicted by face negotiation theory and vary over time based on the “generation” of the worker.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the study hypotheses, a field study was conducted to assess main and interactive effects of gender and generation on the five strategies for conflict management: Integrating, obliging, dominating, avoiding and compromising. Questionnaire data were collected over four decades (1980s-2010s) from employed students (N = 6,613). Data analysis was performed using a multivariate analysis of covariance.

Findings

The results suggest female employees consistently use more noncompeting strategies (integrating, obliging, avoiding and compromising) than male employees and male employees consistently use more competing strategy (dominating) than female employees. All the main and interaction effects were significant.

Research limitations/implications

While this study involved primarily students in the USA studying management at two major public universities, there may be implications for a more global population of workers. However, the results support the notion advanced by face negotiation theory that men will generally seek to save face while women will generally avoid conflict in consideration of others.

Practical implications

This study demonstrates that workers employ different conflict-management strategies over time and the use of certain strategies varies by gender. An implication of this study is the need to regularly reassess selection, training and evaluation processes for managers. In addition, supervisors should encourage employees to enhance the effective use of cooperative (integrating, obliging and compromising) strategies and focus on specific situations when uncooperative strategies (dominating and avoiding) may be needed.

Originality/value

By using face negotiation theory as the organizing framework to examine changes in conflict-management strategies over time, this study contributes in a substantial way to the understanding of how gender and generation interact to influence the selection and use of conflict-management strategies in the workplace.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Jeffrey P. Katz, Diane L. Swanson and Lori K. Nelson

This article examines how underlying national culture potentially impacts host country expectations of corporate citizenship for multi‐national firms. We present a…

Abstract

This article examines how underlying national culture potentially impacts host country expectations of corporate citizenship for multi‐national firms. We present a conceptual framework for systematically comparing the impact of national culture on social issues affecting multi‐national firms. Research propositions describe the relationships between national culture and corporate citizenship suggesting potential future empirical research opportunities. Using four countries as examples, we conduct a qualitative comparative analysis to demonstrate the applicability of our culture‐based framework. Finally, we offer implications of our framework for corporate global citizenship of multi‐national firms.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2000

Jeffrey P. Katz and Michael Boland

US Premium Beef Ltd is a cooperative partnership between all segments of the beef industry value chain, affording each segment an interest in the key stages of beef…

Abstract

US Premium Beef Ltd is a cooperative partnership between all segments of the beef industry value chain, affording each segment an interest in the key stages of beef production and processing, as well as an equal share of the financial risks and rewards. This “value‐added” strategy is accomplished through vertical integration and adding a quality‐based pricing structure to more closely link beef producers and consumers. The case study is an example of supply chain management as a strategic response to a mature industry. It also exemplifies how ownership structure of the firm, particularly the emergence of new‐generation cooperatives, is employed as a strategic factor in developing a new competitive approach in an industry characterized by sales decline and aggressive competition from substitute products such as poultry and pork.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

James M. Bloodgood and Jeffrey P. Katz

This article examines the relationship between production capacity and the ongoing battle for market share. Many firms use market share as a performance indicator to…

Abstract

This article examines the relationship between production capacity and the ongoing battle for market share. Many firms use market share as a performance indicator to measure how well they are doing in comparison to their competitors. However, capacity increases can increase the number of firms that regard the firm as a competitor, thereby expanding the firm's competitive arena and limiting the affect of any hoped‐for market share increase. Managers should evaluate the competitive response of a capacity increase, especially with firms that will likely become new competitors, in order to gain an accurate picture of the likely post‐increase scenario.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 14 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Mark Pagell, Jeffrey P. Katz and Chwen Sheu

The purpose of this study is to test the validity of national culture as an explanatory construct for international operations management decision‐making.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to test the validity of national culture as an explanatory construct for international operations management decision‐making.

Design/methodology/approach

National culture is multi‐dimensional thereby allowing for much finer grained comparisons than are possible when examining differences based purely on geography or the level of industrialization. This proposition is examined from the theoretical standpoint then empirically investigated using an existing database.

Findings

This article finds that national culture significantly explains international operations management behaviors among similar manufacturing plants in the same industry located in different cultures.

Originality/value

This study represents a first attempt at using national culture to explain differences of operations decision‐making.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Jeffrey P. Katz and Michael Boland

US Premium Beef Ltd is a cooperative partnership between all segments of the beef industry value chain, affording each segment an interest in the key stages of beef…

Abstract

US Premium Beef Ltd is a cooperative partnership between all segments of the beef industry value chain, affording each segment an interest in the key stages of beef production and processing, as well as an equal share of the financial risks and rewards. This “value‐added” strategy is accomplished through vertical integration and adding a quality‐based pricing structure to more closely link beef producers and consumers. The case study is an example of supply chain management as a strategic response to a mature industry. It also exemplifies how ownership structure of the firm, particularly the emergence of new‐generation cooperatives, is employed as a strategic factor in developing a new competitive approach in an industry characterized by sales decline and aggressive competition from substitute products such as poultry and pork.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 102 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Jeffrey P. Katz, Mark D. Pagell and James M. Bloodgood

Only one customer really counts: the end customer. The final purchaser decides whether each supply chain member adds value, and is thus willing to pay for the added…

Abstract

Only one customer really counts: the end customer. The final purchaser decides whether each supply chain member adds value, and is thus willing to pay for the added benefit, or whether by‐passing a particular link in the supply chain makes economic sense. It is in this context that profit, based on value‐adding behaviors, provides the primary incentive and reward for supply chain members to organize. This article suggests that successful supply chains are those that are evolving into supply communities. This article presents a framework for more thoroughly understanding the motivation that members of the supply chain have for developing consistent business strategies, thereby enabling the supply community to compete effectively.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 26 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2017

Nitika Garg, J. Jeffrey Inman and Vikas Mittal

Choice deferral (making no choice at all) is a common phenomenon, especially when individuals face a difficult decision. This is further exacerbated in the presence of…

Abstract

Purpose

Choice deferral (making no choice at all) is a common phenomenon, especially when individuals face a difficult decision. This is further exacerbated in the presence of negative incidental emotions which can have a wide-ranging influence on various aspects of decision-making. Previous research suggests that process (vs outcome) accountability might be more effective at mitigating the effect of irrelevant factors. This paper aims to examine whether accountability attenuates emotion effects on choice and examines the differences in the efficacy of the two accountability types.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses the appraisal tendency framework to propose differences between same valenced emotions on choice deferral and predicts the moderating role of process versus outcome accountability. Two experiments are conducted to test the predictions and the results analyzed using logistic regression.

Findings

The authors find that outcome and process accountability have different moderating effects on emotion and choice deferral relationship: under outcome accountability, angry individuals are more likely to defer choice while under process accountability, differences in choice across emotion conditions are attenuated. As predicted, differences between anger and fear on the certainty appraisal and thereby information processing, mediate the effects of emotion on choice deferral in the outcome (but not process) condition.

Originality/value

This research studies the intersection of two developing research streams, affect and accountability, by focusing on specific affective states (anger and fear) and specific accountability types (outcome and process) in the important context of decision avoidance in consumer behavior. Thus, theoretical understanding in both domains is advanced and the benefits of specific accountability types clarified. Key implications for consumers and future research directions are also discussed.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 51 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Sociology of Crime, Law and Deviance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-889-6

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