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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2008

Jeffrey E. Lewin and Wesley J. Johnston

The purpose of this study is first to investigate how well downsized suppliers, as compared to non‐downsized suppliers, are able to satisfy their business customers over…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is first to investigate how well downsized suppliers, as compared to non‐downsized suppliers, are able to satisfy their business customers over time; and second whether these same business customers having stronger or weaker repurchase intentions toward downsized suppliers, as compared to non‐downsized suppliers.

Design/methodology/approach

A random sample of 560 purchasing professionals from a wide range of industries and firms provide responses on the performance of, their satisfaction with, and their repurchase intentions toward downsized and non‐downsized industrial suppliers.

Findings

The results of the study indicate that downsized suppliers, as compared to non‐downsized suppliers, overall are doing a significantly poorer job of satisfying their business customers, leading to significantly lower ratings of loyalty and repurchase intentions. However, some surprising results emerge regarding the non‐linear pattern of low, medium and high levels of downsizing on performance and repurchase intentions.

Practical implications

Suppliers who downsize are at risk of losing important business customers as their abilities to deliver ancillary value‐added services are diminished through the elimination/loss of key customer support personnel. It is important for these suppliers to recognize these risks, and to implement strategies to avoid the potential negative outcomes associated with downsizing.

Originality/value

To date, with possibly one or two exceptions, all studies focusing on downsizing have had an intra‐firm focus. This study investigates downsizing from an inter‐firm perspective, and is the first to focus on the effect of downsizing on business customers’ satisfaction, loyalty, and repurchase intentions.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Audhesh Paswan, Francisco Guzmán and Jeffrey Lewin

This study aims to focus on people’s pro-environmental behavior and investigates its dimensions and determinants. As environmental sustainability attracts increased…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to focus on people’s pro-environmental behavior and investigates its dimensions and determinants. As environmental sustainability attracts increased scrutiny, understanding end consumers’ pro-environmental behavior becomes imperative for various stakeholders in our highly networked marketplace – e.g. policymakers, businesses, consumers, the public and society at large.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from the general public in the USA, the hypothesized relationships are tested using structural equation modeling (SEM).

Findings

The results indicate that if people find enjoyment in nature, believe in achieving a balance between “mankind” and nature, and believe that the benefits of conservation activities are going to accrue in the near term (present), they are more likely to engage in pro-environmental behavior at all levels – supportive, active and lifestyle.

Research limitations/implications

Although only one aspect of environmental sustainability – environmental conservation – is analyzed, these findings support assertions set forth in the theory of environmentally significant behavior (Stern, 1999), the norm-activation theory of altruism (Schwartz, 1973), the theory of reasoned action (Fishbein, 1979) and the theory of planned behavior (Ajzen, 1985).

Practical implications

Messages about sustainability, environmental conservation and pro-environmental behavior should be framed using people’s fondness for and enjoyment of nature; should focus on present benefits of conservation; and should be targeted and differentiated for men, women and older people to encourage conservation behaviors among these differing demographic groups.

Originality/value

This study identifies three different levels of intensity of pro-environmental behavior – supportive, active and lifestyle – and empirically examines the relationships between these behavior types and the attitudinal antecedents revolving around time when the benefits of environmental conservation accrue, nature and human–nature interaction.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 April 2008

Jeffrey Lewin

Abstract

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2000

Jeffrey E. Lewin and Wesley J. Johnston

The pace of organizational change has accelerated, competitive pressures have intensified, and most organizations are now forced to operate within much more complex…

Abstract

The pace of organizational change has accelerated, competitive pressures have intensified, and most organizations are now forced to operate within much more complex environments than was the case a relatively few years ago. In the past, many organizations focused on vertical integration as a means of increasing control in uncertain environments and/or taking advantage of economies of scale. High volume was believed to be the key to success. Today, however, organizations are finding it less beneficial to own and operate a large number of factories or to employ a large number of people. Increased global competition has caused many organizations to realize that the key to competitiveness is not “high‐volume” but “high‐value.”

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2008

Tracy R. Harmon and Merlyn A. Griffiths

The paper seeks to develop a conceptualization of franchisee perceived relationship value (FPRV), defined as the trade‐off between perceived net worth of tangible and…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to develop a conceptualization of franchisee perceived relationship value (FPRV), defined as the trade‐off between perceived net worth of tangible and intangible benefits and costs to be derived over the lifetime of the franchisor‐franchisee relationship, as perceived by the franchisee, taking into consideration the available alternative franchise relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of existing literature provided the relevant constructs and concepts for developing a conceptual framework of FPRV.

Findings

The behavioral aspects of the franchise relationship are explored from the franchisee's perspective, providing an alternative viewpoint of the franchise relationship.

Practical implications

The paper affords a useful foundation for making decisions in a franchise relationship, such as the choice of a new franchisee. This entails a comparison of an existing franchisee about which much is known versus a new franchisee about which less is known. FPRV offers a constructive lens to better evaluate this decision and help frame questions concerning the value of social elements within the relationship.

Originality/value

This work is among the first to examine franchisee relationship value and consequences from the franchisee's perspective. Research propositions surrounding the franchisee's behavioral expectations in the relationship are offered, and serve to guide further research in this area.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2018

Gitesh Dhairyashilrao Chavan, Ranjan Chaudhuri and Wesley J. Johnston

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the underlying knowledge structure and evolution of industrial-buying research published between 1965 and 2015.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the underlying knowledge structure and evolution of industrial-buying research published between 1965 and 2015.

Design/methodology/approach

Bibliometric analysis is performed on 357 relevant papers (using principal component analysis and natural language processing, using VantagePoint® tools, used to generate bubble maps, auto-correlation maps and Aduna cluster maps), demonstrating how various factors involved in industrial buying have evolved, their degree of correlation with each other and the interrelationships of multiple factors concerning their co-occurrences.

Findings

The systematic mapping of industrial-buying research would illustrate the development of the significant factors in industrial-buying research. This paper provides both a global perspective on the leading countries and journals in the field and a robust roadmap for further investigation in this field.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is limited to the data considered for analysis and may, therefore, overlook or underestimate some work that has not been captured while filtering databases related to industrial buying.

Practical implications

This paper facilitates near-future projection and trend analysis in industrial-buying research.

Originality/value

The methodology used is unique to the field of business-to-business marketing.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Jeffrey E. Lewin and Wesley J. Johnston

With the publication of Volume 10 Number 4 1995, the Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing (JBIM) celebrated its tenth anniversary. Over the years, JBIM has emerged…

Abstract

With the publication of Volume 10 Number 4 1995, the Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing (JBIM) celebrated its tenth anniversary. Over the years, JBIM has emerged as a leading journal in the area of business‐to‐business marketing. To commemorate this achievement, examines the contributions of the Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing to the marketing field, in general, and to the more specific sub‐area of business‐to‐business marketing in particular. To accomplish this, reviews the origins of JBIM and provides an analysis of the nature of the articles published and contributors’ backgrounds. In addition, presents an overview of the journal’s history, contributions and content, along with some interesting summary statistics. Finally, discusses JBIM’s past and present objectives, as well as its current positioning, recent developments and future directions.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2012

David Strutton and Jeffrey Lewin

This study aims to explore the economic impact of the Great Recession on consumers' economic attitudes and behaviors.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the economic impact of the Great Recession on consumers' economic attitudes and behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a questionnaire completed by 2,120 subjects. Eight propositions involving six constructs (i.e. “recessionary impact on others”, “economic knowledge”, “economic concerns”, “recessionary resignation” (as antecedents) and “financial prudence” and “propensity to postpone major purchases” (as outcomes)) and five consumer (age and gender) cohorts were tested through structural equation modeling.

Findings

Ten relationships, each grounded in behavioral economics theory, were tested. Nine were statistically significant. But unexpectedly, two significant relationships were negative. Specifically, their perceptions of “recessionary impact on others” and “economic concern” influenced consumers' financial prudence and major purchase postponement. As predicted, consumers' “recessionary resignation” influenced them to postpone major purchases, but did not impact their financial prudence. “Economic concerns” negatively influenced financial prudence, but failed to influence postponement. Financial prudence influenced propensity to postpone major purchases. Age status significantly influenced financial prudence and postponement, but only among the youngest (less than 29 years) and oldest (45+) cohorts. Results revealed the more women knew about the economy, the more inclined they were to postpone major purchases. Older women, in particular, were prone to recessionary resignation. Interestingly, the condition encouraged older women to be less financially prudent. Theoretical explanations for unexpected relationships are offered.

Originality/value

Managerial recommendations for promoting and positioning products during or in the immediate aftermath of recessionary situations are developed.

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Jeffrey E. Lewin and Daniel C. Bello

In institutional settings, the decision to adopt technically innovative products is usually made jointly by individuals representing various functional groups. Each…

Abstract

In institutional settings, the decision to adopt technically innovative products is usually made jointly by individuals representing various functional groups. Each individual participant exerts significant influence over the adoption decision; and often the needs and concerns of various participants and groups differ. These characteristics contribute to the complexity of the purchase decision process and accentuate barriers to adoption, thus presenting special challenges for marketers of technically innovative products. The research discussed was designed to investigate the purchase decision process for technically innovative products in institutional markets. The US educational market provides the setting for the investigation. This market’s purchasing process is similar to a variety of tax‐funded institutional markets (e.g. governmental agencies, public health care facilities). Additionally, this market is significant ‐ in its own right ‐ for two important reasons: (1) it currently spends $225 billion annually, and (2) it significantly affects the future socio‐economic success of the USA. The results of the investigation provide important insights into the problems associated with marketing technically innovative products to these types of institutional markets.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Jeffrey E. Lewin and Wesley J. Johnston

With a few exceptions, the extant literature lacks substantive analysis of the ways downsizing and outsourcing impact on organizational structure and the roles and…

Abstract

With a few exceptions, the extant literature lacks substantive analysis of the ways downsizing and outsourcing impact on organizational structure and the roles and behaviors of organizational members. This is especially true of research focussing on organizational buying behavior. Provides an important step toward increasing our understanding in these areas by proposing a model of some of the conceptual linkages between current organizational downsizing and outsourcing initiatives and organizational structure and buying behavior. Develops theoretical arguments along with a set of propositions concerning the likely effects of downsizing and outsourcing on organizational structure, as well as on buying centre structure, membership, and shared authority, and on purchase participant role conflict, motivation, and risk aversion. Aims to encourage future conceptual and empirical analyses of these important relationships and linkages.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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