Search results

1 – 10 of 28
Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Lynn Metcalf, Jeffrey S. Hess, Jeffrey E. Danes and Jay Singh

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how a web‐based virtual ideation tool, dialogr.com, can be used to capture insights from consumers and to gain an understanding of…

3526

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how a web‐based virtual ideation tool, dialogr.com, can be used to capture insights from consumers and to gain an understanding of consumer satisfaction with package design during and after product use. The authors also demonstrate how the resulting rich qualitative data can be combined with output from traditional survey research, to provide insight into the impact of satisfaction with package design on purchase intent.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed‐methods approach was employed that captured qualitative insights from a large number of consumers regarding their experience using product packaging and combined the quantitative rigor of survey research to capture brand familiarity and perceptions, as well as brand preference and loyalty.

Findings

Results demonstrate that design is important to consumers and also that consumers are increasingly design literate. The perceived quality of the package design does impact brand evaluation. Negative reactions to product packaging adversely impacted intent to purchase and intent to recommend the product to others.

Practical implications

Results show that the mixed model is a promising method for gaining feedback on new package designs. Substantive implications include: design drives purchase, consumers want to be involved in design, and getting user input on design is important.

Originality/value

Consumer packaged goods companies often test packaging prototypes in a limited way – they either ignore qualitative measurement completely or use small sample focus groups. This quali‐quant method offers two advantages over the methodologies most commonly used to study package design; it has the capacity to engage large numbers of consumers and it can be set up to gather data from consumers during or immediately after product use.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2010

Jeffrey E. Danes, Jeffrey S. Hess, John W. Story and Jonathan L. York

As an aid to understanding brand image and brand attitude, this paper aims to present an innovative method of capturing qualitative brand associations from very large virtual…

4948

Abstract

Purpose

As an aid to understanding brand image and brand attitude, this paper aims to present an innovative method of capturing qualitative brand associations from very large virtual groups.

Design/methodology/approach

From the target market, two familiar brands were selected: one more favored and one less favored by the market segment. Two samples of respondents engaged in a collaborative, virtual ideation session designed to elicit “top of mind” brand associations for two fast food brands, McDonald's and In‐N‐Out. Members of each group posted their brand associations and then rated each other's associations on the basis of agreement.

Findings

Analysis provided by dialogr.com showed sharp differences between the two brand images. To independently assess brand attitude, two judges evaluated favorability of the free associations as either “good,” “neutral,” or “bad.” The results confirmed initial expectations. The more favored brand received considerably more favorable free associations than did the less favored brand. The results are shown in qualitative word maps.

Research limitations/implications

A potential limitation of this paper is that the proposed qualitative method is more applicable to well‐known, familiar brands; thus these techniques may not work as well with less familiar brands.

Practical implications

Virtual collaboration tools provide a proficient method of measuring brand image and brand attitudes, for very large groups. These tools are well suited for gaining greater understanding of the cognitive and affective dimensions of a realized brand position (image) as well as an aid to re‐positioning an errant brand image.

Originality/value

Most qualitative group interviews are limited to a small number of respondents, ranging from five to 12 people. Virtual ideation sessions, which are designed to elicit “top of mind” brand associations, enable collection of qualitative data from large groups quickly and efficiently; without the negative influences of face‐to‐face group interaction.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2012

Jeffrey E. Danes and Joan Lindsey‐Mullikin

This paper presents a model relating Nagle and Holden's factors of price sensitivity to expected price and willingness to pay. This work presents various perspectives on price…

5364

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents a model relating Nagle and Holden's factors of price sensitivity to expected price and willingness to pay. This work presents various perspectives on price elasticity/sensitivity, empirically tests aspects of the influence of perception of the offer (product/service) on expected price, and illustrates how the pricing methods developed within provide quantitative precision to the practice of price setting by capturing perceptions important to consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a within‐subjects design to study four brands in two product categories, automobiles and computers. Model evaluation employs ordinary least squares regression.

Findings

Ten qualitative factors were studied. Overall, the results show four factors predict expected price for the target market, product and brand. The factors are perceived substitutes, quality, fairness, and unique value.

Originality/value

This research makes the following contributions. First, the authors are able to quantify ten factors of price sensitivity relevant to the evaluation of product pricing. Second, they are able to identify the relevant factors of price sensitivity for two product categories specific to a given target market. Third, they provide a data‐driven model that enables translation of pricing variables into quantitative values to arrive at the price of a product. The major theoretical contribution of this paper is to show that Nagle and Holden's ten factors of price sensitivity may act in the following way: the change in product/service perception may influence expected price, and then the change in expected price influences willingness to pay. The empirical focus of the current research is on the first of these two changes.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Len Tiu Wright

193

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2010

Len Tiu Wright

343

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Book part
Publication date: 29 January 2024

Kirsi Snellman, Henri Hakala and Katja Upadyaya

We theorize the critical role of angel investors' affective experiences and first impressions in the context of entrepreneurial finance. We develop a model and propositions to…

Abstract

Purpose

We theorize the critical role of angel investors' affective experiences and first impressions in the context of entrepreneurial finance. We develop a model and propositions to illustrate why angel investors make the decision to continue screening, thus explaining why certain investment proposals make it, while others do not.

Methodology/Approach

Drawing on affective events theory and the literature on affective experiences, we theorize how the perceptions of pitches that trigger positive or/and negative physiological arousal, short-lived emotions, and associated thoughts are different, thus allowing us to build new theory of how these different experiences can influence the outcome of the evaluation process in the initial screening stage.

Findings

Our model suggests that the initial evaluation unfolds in five stages: perception of an entrepreneurial pitch, physiological arousal, emotions, first impression, and a decision to continue screening. When different manifestations of physiological arousal and subsequent emotions set the tone of first impressions, they can be either a positive, negative, or mixed experience. While positive and mixed first impression can lead to selection, negative first impression can lead to rejection.

Originality/Value

We illustrate what is of value for angel investors when they look for new investments, and why certain entrepreneurial pitches lead to the decision to continue screening, while others do not. We propose that what angel investors feel is particularly important in situations where they are not yet making the ultimate decision to invest money but are involved in decisions about whether to continue to spend time to investigate the investment proposal.

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2020

Abstract

Details

The Impact of Global Drug Policy on Women: Shifting the Needle
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-885-0

Book part
Publication date: 23 May 2005

Jeffrey P. Carpenter, Glenn W. Harrison and John A. List

There are several ways to define words. One is to ascertain the formal definition by looking it up in the dictionary. Another is to identify what it is that you want the…

Abstract

There are several ways to define words. One is to ascertain the formal definition by looking it up in the dictionary. Another is to identify what it is that you want the word-label to differentiate.

Details

Field Experiments in Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-174-3

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1900

The statements which have recently been made in various quarters to the effect that Danish butter is losing its hold on the English market, that its quality is deteriorating, and…

Abstract

The statements which have recently been made in various quarters to the effect that Danish butter is losing its hold on the English market, that its quality is deteriorating, and that the sale is falling off, are not a little astonishing in face of the very strong and direct evidence to the contrary furnished by the official records. As an example of the kind of assertions here alluded to may be instanced an opinion expressed by a correspondent of the British Food Journal, who, in a letter printed in the March number, stated that “My own opinion is that the Danes are steadily losing their good name for quality, owing to not using preservatives and to their new fad of pasteurising… .”

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1974

DEREK AUSTIN

Before starting to trace the development of PRECIS to its theoretical beginnings I shall describe the system briefly in its present form. This will serve not only as an…

130

Abstract

Before starting to trace the development of PRECIS to its theoretical beginnings I shall describe the system briefly in its present form. This will serve not only as an introduction for those who are not familiar with the system, but will also help to explain the relevance of some of the historical sections which follow, in which we shall see how a machine‐produced alphabetical indexing system, based on a syntax derived from a study of natural language, developed out of research into principles for a new general classification.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

1 – 10 of 28