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Article
Publication date: 28 February 2020

Jeffrey W. Alstete and Nicholas J. Beutell

The purpose of this study is to analyze learning assurance measures derived from a business simulation as part of capstone business strategy courses delivered via distance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to analyze learning assurance measures derived from a business simulation as part of capstone business strategy courses delivered via distance learning (DL) compared to traditional classroom (on-ground [OG]) delivery modes using experiential learning theory.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 595 undergraduate capstone business students from 21 course sections taught over a four-year period in a medium-sized private master’s level college is investigated. Variables included learning assurance measures from a competitive online simulation (GLO-BUS), gender, business degree major, capstone course grades and cumulative grade point averages. The analytic strategy included correlations, linear regressions, multiple regressions and multivariate analyses of variance.

Findings

Results reveal that there are significant differences in learning assurance report (LAR) scores, gender differences and differences between academic majors based on delivery mode (OG versus DL). Simulation performance was higher for DL students, although the relationship between simulation performance and final course grades was not significantly different for OG and DL cohorts.

Research limitations/implications

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, implications for courses, programs, curricula and learning assessment are considered. The strengths (actual performance measures) and potential limitations (e.g. possible deficiency of measures) of LAR scores are discussed.

Originality/value

This research compares OG and DL modes for strategic management course outcomes using direct assessments, including simulation learning assurance measures, student characteristics, capstone course grades and student grade point averages.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Jeffrey W. Alstete and Nicholas J. Beutell

The purpose of this paper is to focus on connecting recent conceptualizations of learning space design in management education by examining interior building and classroom design.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on connecting recent conceptualizations of learning space design in management education by examining interior building and classroom design.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used mixed methods research: external benchmarking with same industry institutions (n=5) and two surveys of students (n=131) and faculty members (n=38).

Findings

The process helped to envision how a business school could improve by adapting design aspects from industry peers, understanding the needs of students and faculty, and incorporating new teaching methods and instructional technologies to inform learning space solutions.

Research limitations/implications

The small number of external benchmarking partners may make the findings more applicable to the institutional type examined. Yet, the findings and the mixed methods research have implications for learning space design more broadly.

Practical implications

With the business school building boom, the external architecture of new buildings appears to garner much of the attention. However, the researchers believe that the real impact of new business schools is the centrality of interior learning space design and technology.

Originality/value

This paper uses a mixed methods research approach to examine learning space theory and research in relation to a particular business school’s efforts to use this knowledge to design learning spaces in a new building.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2019

Jeffrey W. Alstete and Nicholas J. Beutell

This study aims to consider assurance of learning among undergraduate business students enrolled in capstone business strategy courses using the GLO-BUS competitive…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to consider assurance of learning among undergraduate business students enrolled in capstone business strategy courses using the GLO-BUS competitive simulation. Gender, academic major and business core course performance were examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were 595 undergraduate capstone business students from 21 course sections taught over a four-year period. Variables included learning assurance measures, simulation performance, gender, major, business core course grades, capstone course grade and cumulative grade point average. Correlations, linear regression, multiple regression and multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) were used to analyze the data.

Findings

Learning assurance report scores were strongly related to simulation performance. Simulation performance was related to capstone course grade, which, in turn, was significantly related to the grade point average (GPA). Core business courses were related to learning assurance and performance indicators. Significant differences for gender and degree major were found for academic performance measures. Women and men did not differ in simulation performance.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include the use of one simulation (GLO-BUS) and studying students at one university taught by one professor. Assurance of learning measures needs further study as factors in business program evaluation. Future research should analyze post-graduate performance and career achievements in relation to assurance of learning outcomes.

Originality/value

This study conducts empirical analyses of simulation learning that focuses entirely on direct measures, including student characteristics (gender, major), learning assurance measures, business core course grades, capstone course grades and student GPAs.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2021

Jeffrey W. Alstete, John P. Meyer and Nicholas J. Beutell

The purpose of this study is to utilize an exploratory multiple-case design research method using three undergraduate management courses at a medium-sized private…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to utilize an exploratory multiple-case design research method using three undergraduate management courses at a medium-sized private comprehensive college near a large metropolitan area in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explores differentiated instruction in relation to experiential learning in management education by examining three teaching applications from different management courses to illustrate these concepts.

Findings

The use of differentiated instruction in management education is supported through varied approaches such as individual student and team-based scaffolding that demonstrate the applicability of differentiation. In addition to improving student learning, other benefits include improved student retention and faculty autonomy in course creation and delivery. The implementation involves a proactive response to learner needs informed by a faculty perspective that recognizes student diversity yet retains quality assurance standards with mindful assessment and planning.

Research limitations/implications

The comparatively small number of courses and instructional methods may make the specific findings and examples more relevant to the type of institution examined. Yet, the general conclusions and methods identified have potential implications for learners in a wide variety of colleges and universities.

Practical implications

Differentiated instruction may be a useful approach for enhancing learning in heterogenous groups of students by recognizing student readiness and making appropriate modifications.

Originality/value

This paper offers an exploratory overview of differentiated instruction with guidance for management faculty members in designing and implementing these approaches in their courses.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 29 January 2020

Jeffrey W. Alstete and John P. Meyer

The purpose of this paper is to examine the application of intelligent agents (IAs) in organizational memory systems within the larger schema of knowledge management (KM…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the application of intelligent agents (IAs) in organizational memory systems within the larger schema of knowledge management (KM) strategies. This includes targeted roles of IAs in relation to institutional memory approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual exploration of related sections of the Grundspenkis seven-layer intelligent enterprise memory framework that serves to identify, retain, deliver and reuse information for future utilization is conducted. Applications of IAs in multiple industries are presented to illustrate the conceptual model in practice.

Findings

This paper identifies arising roles that IAs perform in information search, retrieval and analysis in the organizational memory formation process and extensions that have emerged in a non-linear bi-directional form. These layered roles include obtaining and reapplying important information as part of extended human–machine cognition.

Research limitations/implications

While exploratory and conceptual in nature, this research paper discusses IAs as possible components in the advancement of organization memory.

Practical implications

By analyzing the application of IAs in different industries, across select layers of a KM structure, groundwork is laid for both descriptive research (i.e. where and how artificial intelligence is being used in those industries) and prescriptive practice (i.e. how other industries can benefit from such assistance and what patterns of implementation to expect).

Originality/value

This study explores the role IAs play in helping knowledge workers gather, retain and find relevant information and how KM strategies may assist organizational memory.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2019

Nicholas J. Beutell, Jeffrey W. Alstete, Joy A. Schneer and Camille Hutt

The purpose of this paper is to test a model predicting self-employment (SE) personal growth (learning opportunities and creativity) and SE exit intentions (exiting to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test a model predicting self-employment (SE) personal growth (learning opportunities and creativity) and SE exit intentions (exiting to work for someone else and exit likelihood) based on the job demands-resources model.

Design/methodology/approach

SEM was used to examine SE demands and resources, strain, and engagement predicting growth, exit intentions, job satisfaction, and life satisfaction. SE type (owners with employees and independent owners without employees) was a moderator variable. Data were analyzed from a national probability sample (n=464 self-employed respondents for whom SE was their primary work involvement), the National Study of the Changing Workforce.

Findings

Overall support for the model was found. Work–family conflict (demand) and work–family synergy (resource) had the strongest relationships with strain and engagement. Strain was positively related to both growth and exit intentions while engagement was inversely related to exit intentions but positively related to growth. The model was significantly different for business owners and independently self-employed.

Practical implications

These results provide guidance to researchers and educators regarding the challenges of self- employment engagement and strain with implications for selecting business types that minimize exit likelihood while maximizing work engagement and personal growth potential.

Originality/value

This study breaks new ground by testing a structural model of engagement and growth for self-employed individuals while also investigating two types of exit intentions. The authors report findings for growth and exit decisions that have received scant attention in the literature to date. Type of SE was a significant variable.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Jeffrey W. Alstete

Web‐based education and training programs are becoming widely offered at education institutions and companies today. The new electronic learning, or e‐learning, systems…

Abstract

Web‐based education and training programs are becoming widely offered at education institutions and companies today. The new electronic learning, or e‐learning, systems employed by these programs may also be used by work teams at organizations for facilitating creative energy in a virtual context to increase team performance. Various features such as discussion boards, virtual classrooms, digital drop boxes, task lists, calendars, and other features of the e‐learning systems can help teams work and communicate more efficiently. Explores potential features and strategies for team leaders and members to innovatively enhance team management and increase performance using e‐learning systems as a support tool.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Jeffrey W. Alstete and Nicholas J. Beutell

Examines student performance indicators in online distance learning courses offered on the Internet at a mid‐sized private college in the USA. A sample of 74 undergraduate…

Abstract

Examines student performance indicators in online distance learning courses offered on the Internet at a mid‐sized private college in the USA. A sample of 74 undergraduate and 147 graduate business students in ten courses were selected for statistical analysis of their grade performance and the relationship with various indicators. The research results include findings that gender and age are related differently for undergraduate and graduate students to performance in distance learning courses, and that undergraduate grades, age, work experience, and discussion board grades are significantly related to overall course performance. However, standardized test scores (SATs, GMATs) and organization position level are not related to the performance in distance learning courses. Makes recommendations for further qualitative and empirical research on distance learning student performance in online computer‐mediated courses and programs.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 27 June 2018

Jeffrey W. Alstete, Nicholas J. Beutell and John P. Meyer

Abstract

Details

Evaluating Scholarship and Research Impact
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-390-2

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Jeffrey W. Alstete

Abstract

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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