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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Jeffery Smith, Sidney Anderson and Gavin Fox

The purpose of this paper is to examine the interplay between technical and social systems within an organization that potentially affect the service experience, as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the interplay between technical and social systems within an organization that potentially affect the service experience, as perceived by end customers.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores the potential impact of an integrated service quality system on the service experience. A conceptual model is presented, accompanied by a detailed development of the hypotheses. Two samples (Study 1: n=474, Study 2: n=225) of consumers are used to empirically test the proposed model.

Findings

The analysis reveals the impact a technical system has on employees’ inherent abilities (i.e. the social system), which, in turn, affect the overall assessment by customers. Additionally, the situation in which an employee works (i.e. operating environmental conditions) results in differences in the model.

Research limitations/implications

This paper’s main implication is this paper employs established theory to develop a model that is empirically tested to show that implementing and maintaining a quality-oriented service system can positively influence the overall customer experience. The limitations are based primarily on the methodology in which individual employees assessed all aspects of both the social and technical systems.

Practical implications

Managers should be diligent in their design and implementation of the quality components as these affect the work setting in which employees operate.

Originality/value

Prior research has neither explored an integrated service quality system’s impact on the service experience nor employed an established theoretical framework. This work accomplishes both with the results providing contributions to both theory and practice.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 37 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Sidney Anderson and Jeffery Smith

The “services triangle” is a dynamic model in which three interlinked entities (customer, employee and firm) combine to create three dyads [employee-firm (EF)…

Abstract

Purpose

The “services triangle” is a dynamic model in which three interlinked entities (customer, employee and firm) combine to create three dyads [employee-firm (EF), customer-firm (CF) and customer-employee (CE)] that work together to deliver services. This study aims to determine whether significant differences exist vis-à-vis the impact of EF, CF and CE dyads on the service experience.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical evidence from data garnered from 398 surveys was used to test a conceptual model. To test the hypotheses, like-signed first-order dyads were constructed and combined to create second-order dyads, and analysis of variance and post-hoc tests (least significant differences) were used to investigate whether differences among the second-order dyads exist.

Findings

The analysis reveals the differential impact of the three services triangle dyads on the service experience. Specifically, customers’ perception of EF fit appears to have the greatest impact on customers’ evaluation of the service experience, followed by CF and CE fit.

Research limitations/implications

The main implication is that this paper extends conceptual research by providing empirical evidence that the EF dyad is the foundation of the services triangle. The limitations are based primarily on methodology, where the use of a survey to collect data rules out the potential generalizations of true cause and effect while also potentially being subject to common method bias.

Practical implications

Managers should realize that fit within some dyads is more instrumental in determining the service experience than fit within others. A number of managerial implications are proposed and discussed.

Originality/value

Prior research has neither empirically examined the services triangle nor whether significant differences exists among the impact of its dyads on the service experience. Insights from various literatures, the application of the balance theory and the construction of first- and second-order dyads enables an investigation of the various relational patterns contained in the services triangle.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 21 May 2019

Jeffery S. Smith, Jayanth Jayaram, Frederic Ponsignon and Jeremy S. Wolter

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of different antecedent factors (contingencies) on the design of a service recovery system (SRS).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of different antecedent factors (contingencies) on the design of a service recovery system (SRS).

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model was framed and a series of hypotheses generated and tested using data from 158 practicing managers using a multivariate general linear modeling technique.

Findings

The analyses indicated that firms, by and large, mainly considered environmental factors in the SRS design. Additional evidence suggests that managers do consider other contingencies but may do so in a fragmented manner. The results presented herein indicate that firms design back-office aspects of SRS in response to external factors (i.e. the environmental contingency). In contrast, the front-office components appear to have more diverse antecedents but are strongly influenced by the firm’s recovery orientation. The specific recovery practices appear to be implemented per industry standards. In sum, evidence indicates that there are diverse driving factors to total SRS design.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations are based primarily on the methodology as data were obtained from a single person who represented the entire SRS. Care was taken in the study design in order not to compromise the validity of the findings.

Practical implications

The results indicated that managers responsible for system design need to be holistic in SRS design to more tightly link decisions across multiple contingencies so as to more fully integrate total service system design. This is potentially accomplished through the inclusion of aspects of all relevant contingencies when designing recovery systems.

Originality/value

This paper’s main contribution is that it employs established theory to develop and test a model to show that firms consider multiple contingencies while designing SRS. It contributes to the emerging body of work on SRS design by providing insights that can be considered as driving forces behind the design of SRS.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Collins G. Ntim, Kwaku K. Opong, Jo Danbolt and Frank Senyo Dewotor

The purpose of this paper is to investigate and compare the weak‐form efficiency of a set of 24 African continent‐wide stock price indices and those of eight individual…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate and compare the weak‐form efficiency of a set of 24 African continent‐wide stock price indices and those of eight individual African national stock price indices.

Design/methodology/approach

Variance‐ratio tests based on ranks and signs were used to examine the weak‐form efficiency of the 32 stock price indices investigated.

Findings

On average, it was found that irrespective of the test employed, the returns of all the 24 African continent‐wide stock price indices examined in the study are less non‐normally distributed compared to the eight individual national stock price indices examined. The authors also report evidence of the African continent‐wide stock price indices having significantly better weak‐form informational efficiency than their national counterparts.

Practical implications

The policy implication of this evidence is that the African equity price discovery process can be significantly improved if African stock markets integrate their operations. Economically, this may contribute to improved liquidity and more efficient allocation of capital, which in turn can be expected to have a positive impact on economic growth.

Originality/value

The paper makes two major contributions to the extant literature. First, it offers for the first time a comparative analysis of the informational efficiencies of a sample of national stock price indices as against African continent‐wide stock price indices. Second, there is no prior evidence as to whether African stock markets can improve their informational efficiencies by integrating their operations. The paper fills this gap by demonstrating that the African equity price formation process can be improved if African stock markets integrate their operations.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2014

Kimberly M. Ellis and Phyllis Y. Keys

To explain for doctoral students and new faculty, the appropriate techniques for using event study methods while identifying problems that make the method difficult for…

Abstract

Purpose

To explain for doctoral students and new faculty, the appropriate techniques for using event study methods while identifying problems that make the method difficult for use in the context of African markets.

Methodology/approach

We review the finance and strategy literature on event studies, provide an illustrative example of the technique, summarize the prior use of the method in research using African samples, and indicate remedies for problems encountered when using the technique in African markets.

Findings

We find limited use of the technique in African markets due to limited data availability which is attributable to problems of infrequent trading, thin markets, and inadequate access to free data.

Research limitations

Our review of the literature on event studies using African data is limited to English-language journals and sources accessible through our library research databases.

Practical implications

More often, researchers will need to use nonparametric techniques to evaluate market responses for companies in or events affecting the African markets.

Originality/value of the chapter

We make a contribution with this chapter by giving a more detailed description of event study methods and by identifying solutions to problems in using the technique in African markets.

Details

Advancing Research Methodology in the African Context: Techniques, Methods, and Designs
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-489-4

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2020

Frédéric Ponsignon, Jeffery S. Smith and Andi Smart

This study aims to develop and empirically validate the concept of experience capability, which represents an organisation's ability to be adept at managing the customer…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop and empirically validate the concept of experience capability, which represents an organisation's ability to be adept at managing the customer experience. Organisations that build an experience capability develop an expertise in deploying a set of resources and routines to understand, evaluate and improve how they interact with customers across all the points of contact.

Design/methodology/approach

A rigorous process was employed to identify, operationally define, evaluate and validate six dimensions reflecting experience capability. The dimensions were developed and validated using relevant literature, expert interviews, item-sorting techniques, a pilot survey and two surveys, providing a degree of certainty that the intellectual insights are generalisable.

Findings

The experience capability concept is identified as comprising six dimensions that are informed by 27 measurement items. The six dimensions are employee training, employee empowerment, employee evaluation, experience performance management, cross-functional work and channel integration. The findings provide evidence suggesting that the multi-item measurement scale exhibits appropriate psychometric properties.

Practical implications

The empirically validated 27-item measurement scale provides practitioners with an approach to evaluate and improve their organisation's experience capability. It permits both longitudinal comparisons of individual organisations and competitive benchmarking both within and across industry sectors. The approach alerts managers to the critical operational areas that should be measured and provides a structured method to pursue competitive advantage through customer experience capability.

Originality/value

Developing valid and reliable measurement scales is an essential first step in effective theory-building. The paper proposes a theoretical foundation for the experience capability construct and validates a corresponding measurement scale. The scale was developed carefully to achieve the specificity required to undertake meaningful practitioner-centric assessment while maintaining relevance across sectorial contexts. The results complement existing customer-centric experience research by providing distinct intellectual insights from a practitioner perspective. The developed scale permits future intellectual investigation through capability comparisons both within and between companies in different industries/sectors.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Konstantinos Tolikas

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the asymptotic distribution of the extreme daily stock returns in African stock markets over the period 1996‐2007 and examine…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the asymptotic distribution of the extreme daily stock returns in African stock markets over the period 1996‐2007 and examine the implications for downside risk measurement.

Design/methodology/approach

Extreme value theory methods are used to model adequately the extreme minimum daily returns in a number of African emerging stock markets.

Findings

The empirical results indicate that the generalised logistic distribution best fitted the empirical data over the period of study.

Practical implications

Using the generalised extreme value and normal distributions for risk assessment could lead to an underestimation of the likelihood of extreme share price declines which could potentially lead to inadequate protection against catastrophic losses.

Originality/value

To the best of the author's knowledge, this is the first study to examine the lower tail distribution of daily returns for African emerging stock markets.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2018

Emmanuel Joel Aikins Abakah, Paul Alagidede, Lord Mensah and Kwaku Ohene-Asare

The purpose of this paper is to re-examine the weak form efficiency of five African stock markets (South Africa, Nigeria, Egypt, Ghana and Mauritius) using various tests…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to re-examine the weak form efficiency of five African stock markets (South Africa, Nigeria, Egypt, Ghana and Mauritius) using various tests to assess the impact of non-linearity effect and thin trading which are prevalent in African markets on market efficiency.

Design/methodology/approach

The weekly returns of S&P/IFC return indices for five African countries over the period 2000-2013 were obtained from DataStream and analyzed. The study adopted the newly developed Non-Linear Fourier unit root test advanced by Enders and Lee (2004, 2009) which allows for an unknown number of structural breaks with unknown functional forms and non-linearity in data generating process of stock prices series to test the Random Walk Hypothesis (RWH) for the five markets, and an augment regression model.

Findings

In light of the empirical evidence the author(s) using Non-linear Fourier Unit Root Test only fail to reject the RWH for South Africa, Nigeria and Egypt leading to the conclusion that these markets follow the RWH and weak-form efficient whilst Ghana and Mauritius are weak-form inefficient. Besides, evaluating non-linear models without adjusting for thin trading effect shows that, South Africa and Ghana markets are weak-form efficient while Nigeria, Egypt and Mauritius are not. However, after accounting for thin trading effect, the author(s) find that South Africa and Egypt markets follow the RWH. The findings imply that market efficiency results depend on the methodology used.

Originality/value

This paper provides further evidence on stock market efficiency in emerging markets. The finding suggests that thin trading and non-linearity effect influences markets efficiency tests in African stock markets. Thus, recent structural adjustment and liberalization policies have not enhanced stock market operations in Africa. This paper therefore has implications for policy makers and international investors.

Details

International Journal of Managerial Finance, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1743-9132

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 February 2009

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Sam Agyei‐Ampomah

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature and extent of linkages between African stock markets and the relationships between these markets and that of regional…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature and extent of linkages between African stock markets and the relationships between these markets and that of regional and global indices.

Design/methodology/approach

The monthly returns of S&P/IFC return indices for ten African countries over the period 1998‐2007 were analyzed. The index return volatility was decomposed into three components following Barari and the contributions of regional and global market movements to the local index volatility were estimated.

Findings

It was found that African stock markets are still segmented from global markets in spite of recent structural adjustments and that the local index volatility is largely country‐specific, which can be diversified away by cross‐country diversification.

Originality/value

This paper provides further evidence on stock market integration in emerging markets. The finding suggests that African stock markets, with the exception of South Africa, are still segmented from global markets. Thus, recent structural adjustment and liberalisation policies have not reduced stock market segmentation in Africa. This paper therefore has implications for policy makers and international investors.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

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