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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2019

Gregory A. Cranmer, Zachary W. Goldman and Jeffery D. Houghton

The purpose of this paper is to explore newcomers as active participants within their own socialization, through the influence of self-leadership on proactivity and…

1419

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore newcomers as active participants within their own socialization, through the influence of self-leadership on proactivity and subsequently organizational socialization and organizational commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected from 193 organizational newcomers (i.e. individuals within their first year at an organization) working in a variety of industries were examined within three serial mediation models in PROCESS.

Findings

The results of these analyses suggest that self-leadership influences organizational newcomers’ adjustment and subsequent commitment by assisting them in seeking organizational resources.

Research limitations/implications

This study answers calls to explore both the mediating mechanisms through which self-leadership processes influence organizational outcomes and the complex relationships between human workplace interactions and the proximal and distal outcomes of socialization.

Practical implications

The findings indicate that organizational stakeholders should enhance the self-leadership abilities of newcomer, thereby easing the socialization burden on organizations.

Originality/value

This paper offers a novel framework (i.e. self-leadership) for understanding newcomer socialization and provides an encompassing model that recognizes individual capacities, communicative behaviors, adjustment and subsequent organizational attitudes.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 40 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Kevin G. Knotts and Jeffery D. Houghton

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of self-leadership in enhancing work engagement through the mediating mechanisms of affective, normative and continuance…

1109

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of self-leadership in enhancing work engagement through the mediating mechanisms of affective, normative and continuance organizational commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected from 258 transportation workers were examined in a parallel mediation model in PROCESS.

Findings

The results of these analyses suggest that the positive relationship between self-leadership and work engagement is partially mediated by affective commitment and normative commitment, but not by continuance commitment.

Research limitations/implications

The findings imply that organizational decision makers should implement practices designed to increase self-leadership in the workplace and enhance employee work engagement. These practices include empowering leadership, recruitment and selection of self-leading employees, and self-leadership training interventions. The study was subject to limitations common to attitudinal survey research.

Originality/value

This study responds calls to explore the mediating mechanisms through which self-leadership affects organizational outcomes and helps explain why self-leadership affects employee work engagement.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 42 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 August 2021

Sherry A. Maykrantz, Brandye D. Nobiling, Richard A. Oxarart, Luke A. Langlinais and Jeffery D. Houghton

The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically altered the daily lives of millions of people around the world, substantially increasing anxiety and stress levels for many…

Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically altered the daily lives of millions of people around the world, substantially increasing anxiety and stress levels for many. Psychological capital (PsyCap), a multidimensional construct that includes hope, optimism, resilience and self-efficacy, may serve as a resource for helping people more effectively cope with uncertainty resulting in lower levels of perceived stress. The authors hypothesize a negative relationship between PsyCap and perceived stress that is partially and differentially mediated by adaptive and maladaptive coping styles. The authors further hypothesize that work context (home vs workplace) will moderate the relationships between coping styles and perceived stress.

Design/methodology/approach

After receiving Institutional Review Board approval, data were collected during the first week of May 2020 using an online survey. The hypothesized model was tested using structural equation modeling (SEM) techniques, specifically Mplus 8. The authors validated their initial findings using PROCESS Model 14 with 5,000 boot-strapped samples and a 95% confidence interval.

Findings

The authors’ results show that adaptive and maladaptive coping styles differentially mediate the effects of PsyCap on perceived stress with the indirect effects of PsyCap on perceived stress through maladaptive coping being stronger than the indirect effects through adaptive coping. The authors found support for the relationships in our hypothesized model.

Practical implications

The authors’ findings suggest that health interventions aimed at increasing PsyCap may be an effective means of reducing maladaptive coping and perceived stress. Future research should continue to explore PsyCap as a potential means of shaping positive health behaviors.

Originality/value

This study makes a unique contribution to the literature by explaining how PsyCap operates through coping to affect perceptions of stress in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Christopher P. Neck and Jeffery D. Houghton

The purpose of this paper is to provide a thorough review of self‐leadership literature past and present, including a historical overview of how the concept was created…

29320

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a thorough review of self‐leadership literature past and present, including a historical overview of how the concept was created and expanded as well as a detailed look at more recent self‐leadership research trends and directions. The paper also presents a theoretical and conceptual explanation and differentiation of the self‐leadership concept relative to other related motivational, personality, and self‐influence constructs.

Design/methodology/approach

Self‐leadership research and related literatures of motivation, personality and self‐influence are discussed and described in order to present the current state of the self‐leadership body of knowledge and to suggest future directions to explore and study.

Findings

It is suggested that self‐leadership is a normative model of self‐influence that operates within the framework of more descriptive and deductive theories such as self‐regulation and social cognitive theory.

Research limitations/implications

While self‐leadership research composes an impressive body of knowledge, it is a domain of study that has been under‐investigated in some aspects, both empirically and conceptually.

Practical implications

This paper suggests several future directions that researchers can undertake to advance self‐leadership knowledge.

Originality/value

This paper fills a void in the organizational literature by reviewing the body of self‐leadership knowledge, by stating how self‐leadership is a distinctive theory in its own, and by presenting directions for future self‐leadership research.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Jeffery D. Houghton, Christopher P. Neck and Charles C. Manz

In terms of the body of knowledge examining work teams, several books and articles have attempted to address the underlying causes of why work teams fail. However, a…

2892

Abstract

In terms of the body of knowledge examining work teams, several books and articles have attempted to address the underlying causes of why work teams fail. However, a scarcity of writings has focused on the issue of work team sustainability. The dictionary defines “sustain” as “to prevent from falling, collapsing, or giving way,” and “to endure.” This definition gives rise to the following question: “What are the factors that contribute to those work teams that ‘endure’ and that do not ‘fall, collapse, or give way’ during challenging organizational experiences?” In this paper, we will take an initial step toward answering this question by presenting a cognitive model of work team sustainability based upon established cognitive principles of individual‐level effort and performance sustainability. This model is designed to provide some practical insights into the long‐term team performance sustainability issue while also serving as a possible foundation for future research efforts.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Jeffery D. Houghton, T.W. Bonham, Christopher P. Neck and Kusum Singh

This study examined the relationship between self‐leadership and personality through an analysis and comparison of hierarchical factor structures. Structural equation…

8714

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between self‐leadership and personality through an analysis and comparison of hierarchical factor structures. Structural equation modeling techniques were used to examine several competing models combining the hierarchical factor structures of self‐leadership and personality. Model fit increased significantly through a progression of models that reflected increasingly greater distinction between self‐leadership skill dimensions and key personality traits. The best fitting model consisted of a hierarchical factor structure with three first‐order self‐leadership factors, three first‐order personality factors, and two correlated second‐order factors. Unexpectedly, the general second‐order factors of self‐leadership and personality were statistically indistinguishable. Nevertheless, these results seem to provide some initial evidence that self‐leadership dimensions are distinct from, yet related to, certain key personality traits. The implications of these results for future self‐leadership research and practice are discussed.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Trudy C. DiLiello and Jeffery D. Houghton

The purpose of this paper is to develop and present a model of self‐leadership, innovation and creativity.

13151

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and present a model of self‐leadership, innovation and creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon existing theoretical and empirical evidence the paper develops and presents a conceptual model of the relationships between self‐leadership, innovation, creativity, and organizational support. The paper also presents research propositions based upon the relationships suggested by the model.

Findings

The model suggests that individuals with strong self‐leadership will consider themselves to have more innovation and creativity potential than individuals who have weak self‐leadership, and that individuals who have innovation and creativity potential will be more likely to practise innovation and creativity when they perceive strong support from the workplace than individuals who perceive weak support from the workplace.

Research limitations/implications

Future researchers should examine empirically the linkages suggested by this model along with other relationships asserted or implied by the creativity and self‐leadership literature as summarized in the paper.

Practical implications

The model suggests that organizational leaders would be well advised to encourage the practice of self‐leadership among the members of organizations while striving to build work environments that support of creativity and innovation at the group, supervisor, and organizational levels.

Originality/value

This paper makes a valuable contribution to both the self‐leadership and creativity literatures by being one of the first to examine the relationships between these important organizational concepts.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Jeffery D. Houghton

The purpose of this brief commentary is to provide a brief overview of Max Weber's life, work, and contributions to management thought before addressing the question of…

11088

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this brief commentary is to provide a brief overview of Max Weber's life, work, and contributions to management thought before addressing the question of whether his notion of authority still holds in the twenty‐first century.

Design/methodology/approach

The commentary begins with a brief biographical sketch followed by an examination of Weber's conceptualization of authority, its influence on the field of management and its relevancy in the twenty‐first century.

Findings

Weber's writings on charismatic authority have been and continue to be instrumental in shaping modern leadership theory, that the charismatic form of authority may be particularly applicable and effective in today's chaotic and rapidly changing environments, and that the empowered and self‐managing organizational forms of the twenty‐first century may represent merely a different incarnation of Weber's iron cage of legal/rational authority.

Originality/value

This commentary makes an important contribution to the management history literature by examining an important aspect of Weber's influence on management thought, theory, and practice.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

Jeffery D. Houghton

This paper seeks to provide a review and analysis of the contributions and influence of Alfred P. Sloan, Jr, to contemporary business practices and management thought.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to provide a review and analysis of the contributions and influence of Alfred P. Sloan, Jr, to contemporary business practices and management thought.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper begins with an introduction and brief biographical sketch followed by an overview of Sloan's administrative principles as applied at GM. The paper continues with a review of empirical evidence supporting the efficacy of Sloan's principles along with some theoretical explanations for their success. The paper then examines some criticisms surrounding Sloan's contributions before concluding with a discussion of the impact that Sloan's ideas have had on organizational and managerial thought in the context of today's rapidly evolving organizational realities.

Findings

Although he was not a management scholar, Sloan's applied work at General Motors resulted in significant and enduring contributions to business practices and management theory. Yet Sloan's contributions are somewhat overlooked today and have not been extensively or critically examined in the current business and managerial contexts.

Originality/value

This paper makes an important contribution to the management history literature by being among the first to offer a comprehensive critical review of the ways in which Sloan has influenced contemporary management thought, theory, and practice.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2010

Jeffery D. Houghton and Trudy C. DiLiello

This paper sets out to develop and test a hypothesized model of the role of adult leadership development and youth leadership development as possible moderators of the…

7545

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to develop and test a hypothesized model of the role of adult leadership development and youth leadership development as possible moderators of the relationships between creative self‐efficacy, perceived support for creativity, and individual creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs the multi‐group nested goodness‐of‐fit strategy in LISREL 8.53 to test the interaction effects of two qualitative moderator variables.

Findings

Results suggest that adult leadership development may moderate the relationship between perceived organizational support for creativity and individual creativity, while youth leadership development may moderate the relationship between creative self‐efficacy and individual creativity.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include concerns regarding generalizability, possible social desirability and response set biases, self‐report data, and causality. The primary implication is that leadership development, targeted at adults as well as children, may represent one important key for unlocking idle creative potential and enhancing overall organizational effectiveness.

Practical implications

Organizations may wish to consider youth leadership development experiences as potential behaviorally based predictors of future job success for jobs that require creativity. Organizational decision makers should also carefully consider making leadership development opportunities available to organizational members at all levels.

Originality/value

The study is among the first to examine both adult and youth leadership development as potential facilitators of creativity in organizations and has value for practitioners as well as for future creativity and leadership development researchers.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

1 – 10 of 65