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Article
Publication date: 28 April 2020

Oliver William Jones, Jeff Gold and David Devins

The purpose of this paper is to explore who small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) owner–managers consider as key stakeholders for their business for helping increase…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore who small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) owner–managers consider as key stakeholders for their business for helping increase productivity and the nature of the stakeholders' impact.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses the Lego Serious Play methodology and narrative analysis in a focus group setting.

Findings

The analysis revealed a narrow depth of field of productivity stakeholders and identified critical narratives, involving close stakeholders which could constrain productivity. Lack of information on current and/or future productivity states, and a social brake due to the potential impact on employees are two at the forefront of owner–manager perspectives. The study also identified the importance of internal and external champions to improve productivity and re-enforced the significance of skills gaps, the role of Further Education providers and other infrastructure assets.

Research limitations/implications

The purposiveness sample of the single focus group setting results in a lack of generalizability, but provides potential for replication and transposability based on the generic type of stakeholders discussed. The work highlights the potential to further enhance the constituent attributes of stakeholder salience.

Practical implications

There is a potential for different network agents to increase their collaboration to create a more coherent narrative for individual productivity investment opportunities and for policy makers to consider how to leverage this.

Social implications

The findings suggest that the implications of deskilling and job loss are major factors to be considered in the policy discourse. SMEs are less likely to pursue productivity improvements in a low growth setting because of their local social implications.

Originality/value

The study is innovative in using Lego to elucidate narratives in relation to both stakeholder identification and their contributions to productivity improvement impact in a UK SME context. The study introduces an innovative stakeholder orbital map and further develops the stakeholder salience concept; both useful for the future conceptual and empirical work.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 70 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2019

Alaa Garad and Jeff Gold

The purpose of this paper is to propose a model for organizational learning (OL) that can help organizations to transform into a learning-driven organization (LDO); a…

1463

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a model for organizational learning (OL) that can help organizations to transform into a learning-driven organization (LDO); a model that considers the whole ecosystem, its subsystems and considers the importance of technology, digitalization and dataism. The authors seek to answer key questions, specifically, first, what makes an organization learning-driven? and, second, how the learning ecosystem works organization-wide?

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on prior research conducted by the authors in the hospitality sector. Insights were gleaned from both theoretical perspectives and qualitative data drawn from a number of empirical studies. This paper focuses on critically reviewing the literature on OL, and selected organizational development frameworks such as the European Foundation for quality management and investors in people.

Findings

The authors propose an ecosystem model that entails three subsystems for OL. At this stage, the authors propose a conceptual framework that will be tested in the following part two. Leaders in organizations need to re-design their organizations to incorporate learning at all levels, i.e. individuals, teams and organization-wide. Learning should be an overarching approach within and beyond the boundaries of the organizations; for organizations to learn effectively, learning should be strategized and institutionalized.

Research limitations/implications

This paper sheds light on the emerging trends in OL in light of the Industry 4.0 revolution with its phenomenal impact on humans and workplace; there is a dire need for research on human-machine balance, role and impact of machine learning and AI technologies. The authors call for setting up an updated agenda for learning and reconstructing learning into the corporate world; not only this but the future research should focus on reviewing and evaluating what did the authors learn about learning and how can the authors further learn, unlearn and re-learn.

Practical implications

The authors argue that organizations should look into learning as an enabler toward creativity and innovation, which should ultimately lead to excellence and fulfilling the needs of all stakeholders. Organizations should be consciously aware of their emerging intangible assists and proactively encourage their people toward more creativity. Learning can be institutionalized, and the organization transforms into a LDO.

Social implications

The authors propose an ecosystem model that entails three subsystems for OL. At this stage, the authors propose a conceptual framework that will be tested in the following part two. Leaders in organizations need to re-design their organizations to incorporate learning at all levels, i.e. individuals, teams and organization-wide. Learning should be an overarching approach within and beyond the boundaries of the organizations; for organizations to learn effectively, learning should be strategized and institutionalized.

Originality/value

The LDO model will help organizations to strategize learning. Strategic learning about understanding a global strategy and how each business unit in an organization contributes its best, most innovative thinking followed by actions that execute the strategic intent of the organization.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 51 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Jeff Gold, Tony Oldroyd, Ed Chesters, Amanda Booth and Adrian Waugh

This paper seeks to show appreciation for the collective endeavour of work practices based on varying degrees of dependence, interdependence and mutuality between at least…

1743

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to show appreciation for the collective endeavour of work practices based on varying degrees of dependence, interdependence and mutuality between at least two people. Such dependencies have to be concerned with how talent is used and how this use is an interaction between people, a process called talenting. The aim of this paper is to provide a method to explore talenting.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a brief overview of recent debates relating to talent management (TM). This paper argues that TM seldom pays attention to work practices where performance is frequently a collective endeavour. A mapping method is explained to identify work practices and obtain narrative data. This paper provides a case to explore talenting in West Yorkshire Police.

Findings

In total, 12 examples are found and 3 are presented showing the value of various forms of dependency to achieve outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

TM needs to move beyond employment practices to work practices. There is a need to close the gap between traditional TM employment practices, usually individually focused, and work practices which are most likely to require a collective endeavour.

Practical implications

There needs be ongoing appreciation of talenting to add to TM activities.

Social implications

This paper recognises a more inclusive approach to TM based on work performance.

Originality/value

This paper, to the best of the authors’s knowledge, is probably the first enquiry of its kind.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 40 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Steve Cockerill, Gerry Stewart, Les Hamilton, John Douglas and Jeff Gold

Reports on the development of a module concerning theinternational management of change by a multidisciplined team atLeeds Metropolitan University. The aim of the module…

1353

Abstract

Reports on the development of a module concerning the international management of change by a multidisciplined team at Leeds Metropolitan University. The aim of the module is to enable students to combine problem‐based learning within an action research methodology using a case study to highlight the nature and processes of change within international business organizations. Explains the underlying rationale and describes the phases of learning, incorporating qualitative data from the evaluations of pilots in the UK and France.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 August 2022

Ollie Jones, Jeff Gold and Julia Claxton

This paper aims to provide an exposition of the constructive research approach (CRA) to show the potential utility of CRA in transcending or mitigating the methodological…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an exposition of the constructive research approach (CRA) to show the potential utility of CRA in transcending or mitigating the methodological and practical issues involved in researching organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a literature review, and resulting thematic discussion of methodological and practical issues involves in action research (AR) in organisations through the lens of the CRA approach.

Findings

The paper identifies that CRA has benefits in orientation to a practical outcome grounded in a theoretical domain but with leeway to facilitate creativity, which can also potentially improve the quality of the collaborative relationships. The centrality of the construction within the method provides a “vantage point” to manage the emic (inside) and etic (outside) positionality concerns of action researchers working within organisational settings.

Practical implications

CRA has multiple practical benefits for action researchers and their collaborators in terms of time, risk and collaborative commitment.

Originality/value

The paper develops a useful tactical framework for discussing the practical and methodological issues when considering AR in organisations and highlights how CRA can be used in wider organisational scholarship outside its roots in management accounting.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2020

Hazel Kershaw-Solomon, Nick Beech, Jeff Gold, Julia Claxton, Tricia Auty and Susan Beech

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact competency frameworks as standardisation can have on the employee engagement of academic staff within higher education…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact competency frameworks as standardisation can have on the employee engagement of academic staff within higher education (HE) through their employment as managerial tools.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review is conducted from which the conditions for effective competency frameworks are evaluated and the influence of changes in the HE environment in the form of political agendas and tight resources are explored.

Findings

This paper provides insights into the dynamics of public service modernisation and the tensions between the dominant discourse of managerialism and the degree of agency afforded to professional academics. It highlights the relevance of informal peer relationships in setting the climate to generate collegial bonding and professional engagement that underpin successful teacher fellowship accreditations. It further highlights the key role managers play in this process and provides a conceptual framework highlighting the dynamics and combined effect of employee engagement and competency frameworks set within complex HE environment.

Practical implications

This paper brings together the prerequisites for effective implementation of competency frameworks to implement successful employee engagement strategies set within the complexities of the HE context, which has not been studied to date. Armed with such insights, Human Resource Development (HRD) departments and universities can implement competency assessments that generate greater staff engagement.

Originality/value

The paper provides a critical approach in reviewing the impact of Continued Professional Development and its link to professional status and thus helps British Universities and others to understand how the mechanisms at work affect engagement levels of academic staff. Armed with this depth of understanding of how the change initiative works, with whom and under what circumstances, universities will be better able to meet target UK Professional Standards Framework membership levels required by the higher education academy (HEA) and, subsequently, the HEA to meet their targets for the government.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 45 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Nick Beech, Jeff Gold and Susan Beech

The purpose of this paper is to first consider how veterans use talk to shape interpretations of personal and social identify. Second, this paper seeks to gain an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to first consider how veterans use talk to shape interpretations of personal and social identify. Second, this paper seeks to gain an understanding of how veterans see themselves in a civilian world, their ability to re-conceptualise and realign their perspective on life to support their transition in to a civilian world.

Design/methodology/approach

Underpinned by Ricoeur’s theory of narrative identity, the work provides a qualitative analysis data from coaching interviews with five veterans.

Findings

The findings revealed the on-going legacy of military life and how its distinctiveness and belief centred on kinship shapes personal identity and the way they see their civilian world. The work sheds light on to the benefits of this Ricoeur’s self-reflexive approach and how it can be used to provide a deeper insight in to the nature of personal transitions and how narrative can be used to expose complexities of the narratives of personal history and meaning as the narrator becomes both the seeker and what is sought.

Practical implications

The work reinforces the value of Ricoeur’s self-reflexive approach identifying narrative mediating between two “poles” of identity and the act of mimesis; prefiguration, configuration and refiguration as veterans project stories of their world and their place within it.

Originality/value

The paper provides new insights in to the importance of narrative identify broadening its potential application with engagement across diverse communities, thereby providing depth and rigour of its conceptual understanding of personal identify. The work further provides insights in to the challenges facing veterans to integrate within a civilian society.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 41 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 October 2019

Dae-seok Kang, Jeff Gold, Jeongeun Kim and Ilsoo Kim

The purpose of this paper is to examine the instrumental use of social capital regarding career growth within an organization, focusing on the mediating role of perceived…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the instrumental use of social capital regarding career growth within an organization, focusing on the mediating role of perceived competence mobilization and the moderating role of two situational variables: perceived external prestige and job insecurity climate.

Design/methodology/approach

Relationships among the constructs are predicted based on relevant literature, and are tested using survey results from 324 employees working in 14 leading corporations in Korea.

Findings

Results show that social capital positively influenced, via perceived competence mobilization, each of two career growth dimensions (i.e. the personal efforts to develop a career and the experience of being rewarded by the organization). In contrast, moderated path analysis indicated that perceptions of external prestige and job insecurity climate failed to moderate the indirect effect of social capital on career growth.

Practical implications

In light of the instrumental use of social capital and the ensuring mechanism of competence mobilization, a detailed understanding of this effect on career growth cannot only neutralize the fears of brain drain, but is also helpful in providing possibilities for building new career development strategies.

Originality/value

Although social capital has become an influential concept in social sciences, little evidence has been presented on the above relationship, particularly from the perspective of careerist orientation. This may be the first research examining how and when the influence of social capital becomes instrumental with respect to career attainment within an organization.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 December 2019

Nick Beech, Jeff Gold, Susan Beech and Tricia Auty

This paper aims to explore the impact discourse has on decision making practices within the boardroom and considers how personal proficiency in micro-language use can…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the impact discourse has on decision making practices within the boardroom and considers how personal proficiency in micro-language use can enhance an individual’s personal efficacy in influencing boardroom decisions. The work uses Habermas’ theory of communicative action to critique board talk, highlighting the need for greater understanding of the power of everyday taken for granted talk in strategy shaping. It illuminates the contribution that human resource development (HRD) professionals can make to the management of such behaviour and minimising dysfunctional behaviour and enabling effective boardroom practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Traditional governance theory from a business and organisational perspectives are provided before considering the boardroom environment and HRD’s role. The authors undertake ethnographic research supported by conversation analysis to explore how directors use talk-based interpersonal routines to influence boardroom processes and enact collective decision making. The authors provide one extract of directors’ talk to illustrate the process and demonstrate what the data “looks like” and the insights it holds.

Findings

The analysis suggests that the established underlying assumptions and rationale ideologies of corporate governance are misplaced and to understand the workings of corporate governance HRD academics and professionals need to gain deeper insight into the employment of talk within boards. Armed with such insights HRD professionals can become more effective in developing strategies to address dysfunctional leadership and promote good governance practice throughout their organisation.

Social implications

The work raises a call for HRD to embrace a societal mediation role to help boards to become a catalyst for setting good practice which is strategically aligned throughout the organisation. Such roles require a more dialogical, strategic and critical approach to HRD, and professionals and academics take a more holistic approach to leadership development.

Originality/value

The paper considers the role of the development of HRD interventions that both help individuals to work more effectively within a boardroom environment and support development to shape a boardroom culture that promotes effective governance practice by influencing boardroom practice thereby promoting strong governance and broad social compliance throughout the organisation.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 44 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

David Devins and Jeff Gold

Policy documents stress the importance of learning and knowledge to the competitiveness of the economy. The documents draw attention to the positive impact on economic…

2306

Abstract

Policy documents stress the importance of learning and knowledge to the competitiveness of the economy. The documents draw attention to the positive impact on economic performance although the link between management training and small firm performance remains empirically contested. Many outside agencies, and particularly those which are publicly funded, face significant difficulties in bringing new learning to smaller organisations. In particular, generalised notions, recipes and tool‐kits of techniques for how small business managers should be developed can easily be dismissed as irrelevant by the small business managers themselves. This would suggest a methodological gap which highlights the failure of many interventionist frameworks. Argues that this gap can be bridged by taking a social constructionist view to supporting small business managers and the development of their organisations. Provides an introduction to the key ideas of social constructionism and their relevance to understanding the support process underpinning the development of managers in smaller businesses. Concludes with a discussion of the implications of social constructionism for those involved in researching, evaluating and developing services to support management development in small business organisations.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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