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Article

Catharine M. Curran and Jef I. Richards

Over the past 30 years the United States has grappled with the regulation of children's advertising in various media. The same debate that occurred in the 1970's in the US…

Abstract

Over the past 30 years the United States has grappled with the regulation of children's advertising in various media. The same debate that occurred in the 1970's in the US over banning children's advertising is heating up in the EU today. As with other regulatory issues the regulation of children's advertising involves trade‐offs. In the US, the First Amendment rights of the advertisers must be balanced with the government interest in protecting children. The regulation of children's advertising also involves balancing the competing interests of advocacy groups, legislators, broadcasters and advertisers. Advocacy groups have been very effective in focusing public attention on the issues of children's advertising. One of the most vocal and impactful groups was Action for Children's Television (ACT), whose efforts culminated in the passage of the 1990 Children's Television Act. Once that was accomplished, ACT was disbanded. In more recent years, however, the Centre for Media Education (CME) has replaced ACT in calling for regulation of children's advertising. CME was instrumental in pushing the 1996 FTC investigation related to 900 telephone numbers directed at children, and is now behind the Child Online Protection Act (COPA). The same questions raised nearly 30 years ago by ACT are now being cast in the US in terms of the Internet, otherwise little has changed. Each new innovation in media and technology ushers similar questions to the table, and the same balancing act must again be employed to answer the basic question: how far do we go to protect our children? The US's answer to this question offers insights for other countries seeking answers to similar questions.

Details

International Journal of Advertising and Marketing to Children, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6676

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Article

Catharine M. Curran and Jef I. Richards

Invasion of privacy is a serious, and sometimes frightening, concept for many people. It can evoke images of big brother, in the form of big business, knowing your most…

Abstract

Invasion of privacy is a serious, and sometimes frightening, concept for many people. It can evoke images of big brother, in the form of big business, knowing your most intimate secrets and even selling those secrets to others. Laws to guard against these personal violations have been slow in coming from the US government. A combination of consumer fears and sluggish federal response is nothing particularly new, but as with other such situations it has provided state and local officials a lever with which to pry public attention out of the hands of their federal counterparts.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article

Catharine M. Curran and Jef I. Richards

Questions the US Government’s (Office of National Drug Control Policy) legislation which encouraged broadcasters to run anti‐drug story lines in their programmes. By doing…

Abstract

Questions the US Government’s (Office of National Drug Control Policy) legislation which encouraged broadcasters to run anti‐drug story lines in their programmes. By doing so, the broadcasters were allowed to reduce the number of legally required obligations to run anti‐drug commercials. The decision was made in response to the unpopular 1997 legislation which provided $1 billion to purchase anti‐drug commercials on the stipulation that broadcasters donate one time slot for every one bought. Asserts that messages supplied in story lines have not been measured in terms of their effectiveness in persuading the audience whereas targeted commercials have. Questions the motivations of the White House.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article

Jan Brusselaers, Ellen Bracquene, Jef Peeters and Yoko Dams

The purpose of this paper is to investigate to what extent a consumer’s repair strategy impacts the annual costs of ownership of a washing machine and two types of vacuum cleaner.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate to what extent a consumer’s repair strategy impacts the annual costs of ownership of a washing machine and two types of vacuum cleaner.

Design/methodology/approach

The annual cost of ownership is determined by calculating the annual life cycle cost (LCC) for the respective devices. The annual LCCs of the different scenarios allow a comparison of the different repair strategy options. A Monte Carlo simulation is run to introduce parameter variability. The device’s failure rate is estimated by a combination of data sets on the devices’ performance.

Findings

Results demonstrate that the repair of the devices considered is a more favourable option over replacement. A consumer who aims for the lowest annual LCC should allow for a high number of repairs per device, without putting a maximum on the cost per repair. However, the consumer should become more cautious when a device approaches the end of its expected lifetime. Finally, the purchase of warranty can be interesting when the warranty covers a sufficiently long proportion of the device’s (expected) lifetime and when its cost does not exceed a threshold proportion of the initial purchase price.

Research limitations/implications

The costs for repair might be overestimated. Future research can focus on the reduction of repair costs following self-repair.

Practical implications

The results provide strong arguments in favour of repair instead of replacement of broken devices.

Originality/value

This is the first research to quantify the influence of consumer behaviour in the context of repair of devices on the ownership costs of these devices.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Abstract

Details

Chinese Social Media
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-136-0

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Article

Neha Seth and Laxmidhar Panda

The purpose of this paper is to obtain a comprehensive structure of past empirical studies on financial contagion which can provide the present growth and future scope of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to obtain a comprehensive structure of past empirical studies on financial contagion which can provide the present growth and future scope of research work on the field of contagion analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

Present study identifies 151 empirical studies on financial contagion and summarises all the studies on the basis of tools and methodology used, year of the studies, origin of the studies, sample period and sample countries taken, studies undertaken on the basis of different crisis period and markets considered and finally sources of the studies.

Findings

The results of the analysis show that the empirical studies on contagion increased continuously over the past five years. Higher order test of contagion with more number of sample countries may provide more accurate picture on financial contagion.

Originality/value

This paper collects, classifies and summarises past empirical studies on financial contagion and provides valuable conclusion on present growth and future scope of studies on financial contagion. The information given in this paper can be helpful for future researchers and academicians on this particular field; the summary of the conclusion (from past reviews) may be helpful for the policy makers for asset allocation and risk management.

Details

Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

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Article

Kathryn Evans, Craig D. Murray, Lorna Jellicoe‐Jones and Ian Smith

Therapeutic relationships have been identified to be a key feature of staff working with patients within mental health settings and are widely referred to within research…

Abstract

Purpose

Therapeutic relationships have been identified to be a key feature of staff working with patients within mental health settings and are widely referred to within research literature. The aim of this study is to explore the experiences of support staff within secure mental health services with regards to the formation and development of therapeutic relationships with patients.

Design/methodology/approach

Ten participants were interviewed, all of whom were unqualified support staff based within secure establishments and working directly with patients.

Findings

Interpretative phenomenological analysis of the data resulted in the identification of three themes: “Building bridges”: developing relationships with patients; “You do forget what they've done”: seeing the person and managing risk, and “Playing your cards close to our chest”: maintaining boundaries.

Originality/value

The themes are discussed and evaluated in terms of relationship formation and development, barriers that may prevent such relationships from being built and the implications for clinical practice.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article

Syed Aliya Zahera and Rohit Bansal

The purpose of this paper is to study and describe several biases in investment decision-making through the review of research articles in the area of behavioral finance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study and describe several biases in investment decision-making through the review of research articles in the area of behavioral finance. It also includes some of the analytical and foundational work and how this has progressed over the years to make behavioral finance an established and specific area of study. The study includes behavioral patterns of individual investors, institutional investors and financial advisors.

Design/methodology/approach

The research papers are analyzed on the basis of searching the keywords related to behavioral finance on various published journals, conference proceedings, working papers and some other published books. These papers are collected over a period of year’s right from the time when the most introductory paper was published (1979) that contributed this area a basic foundation till the most recent papers (2016). These articles are segregated into biases wise, year-wise, country-wise and author wise. All research tools that have been used by authors related to primary and secondary data have also been included into our table.

Findings

A new era of understanding of human emotions, behavior and sentiments has been started which was earlier dominated by the study of financial markets. Moreover, this area is not only attracting the, attention of academicians but also of the various corporates, financial intermediaries and entrepreneurs thus adding to its importance. The study is more inclined toward the study of individual and institutional investors and financial advisors’ investors but the behavior of intermediaries through which some of them invest should be focused upon, narrowing down population into various variables, targeting the expanding economies to reap some unexplained theories. This study has identified 17 different types of biases and also summarized in the form of tables.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on some of the most recent findings to have a quick overview of the latest work carried out in this area. So far very few extensive review papers have been published to highlight the research work in the area of behavioral finance. This study will be helpful for new researches in this field and to identify the areas where possible work can be done.

Practical implications

Practical implication of the research is that companies, policymakers and issuers of securities can watch out of investors’ interest before issuing securities into the market.

Social implications

Under the Social Implication, investors can recognize several behavioral biases, take sound investment decisions and can also minimize their risk.

Originality/value

The essence of this paper is the identification of 17 types of biases and the literature related to them. The study is based on both, the literature on investment decisions and the biases in investment decision-making. Such study is less prevalent in the developing country like India. This paper does not only focus on the basic principles of behavioral finance but also explain some emerging concepts and theories of behavioral finance. Thus, the paper generates interest in the readers to find the solutions to minimize the effect of biases in decision-making.

Details

Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

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