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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Jeannette Oppedisano and Sandra Lueder

NEJE Editors interview Cindi Bigelow: director of activities at Bigelow Tea

Abstract

NEJE Editors interview Cindi Bigelow: director of activities at Bigelow Tea

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New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Jeannette Oppedisano and Kenneth Laird

This article presents a pedagogical model that utilizes students as primary researchers in the identification, interviewing, and then reporting on women entrepreneurs as a…

Abstract

This article presents a pedagogical model that utilizes students as primary researchers in the identification, interviewing, and then reporting on women entrepreneurs as a major component of a multidisciplinary entrepreneurship course. The purpose of the course is to attract students who may not be familiar with the entrepreneurship concept itself, the role of women in such economic ventures, or the possibilities for people like themselves in such a career avenue. Students are exposed to the accomplishments of women entrepreneurs throughout U.S. history in the broad categories of agriculture and mining; construction; communication; manufacturing; service (both for profit and not-for-profit); transportation; and wholesale and retail trade. This content experience is then enhanced by the studentsʼ own direct interaction with and interviewing of women entrepreneurs. The implementation, potential outcomes, and possible adaptations of the course are described, and this transformational learning process model is illustrated.

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New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Jeannette Oppedisano

Traditionally, the concept of entrepreneurship included a for‐profit bottom line. Recently, however, researchers have begun to explore an adaptation of this model called…

Abstract

Traditionally, the concept of entrepreneurship included a for‐profit bottom line. Recently, however, researchers have begun to explore an adaptation of this model called “social entrepreneurship”; that is, creating organizations for the greater good of a community, region, nation, or the world. These entrepreneurs use money that they made or inherited to establish organizations from a missionary and visionary posture. This is an arena where women have had significant impact, yet little has been written to celebrate their contributions. The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of such philanthropy, to suggest where this social ethic might have had its origins, and to provide samples of women who have been entrepreneurial in their social commitment. Suggestions for future research on women's entrepreneurial philanthropy will also be made.

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Women in Management Review, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Barry Armandi, Jeannette Oppedisano and Herbert Sherman

Leadership theory has little value if it cannot be applied to real world situations. A summary review of the literature on leadership theory is provided here first. A…

Abstract

Leadership theory has little value if it cannot be applied to real world situations. A summary review of the literature on leadership theory is provided here first. A disguised real case concerning Ted Shade, a Vice‐President at Galactic Chips, Inc. is then provided which describes a manager who is extremely task‐oriented. The case analysis follows. It includes questions and answers which connect leadership theory to case specifics and requires learners to analyze the case using differing leadership models.

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Management Decision, vol. 41 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

J. L. Morrow

Boards of directors often attempt to foster corporate entrepreneurship by replacing a firmʼs chief executive officer (CEO). Compelling theoretical arguments and anecdotal…

Abstract

Boards of directors often attempt to foster corporate entrepreneurship by replacing a firmʼs chief executive officer (CEO). Compelling theoretical arguments and anecdotal evidence suggest that when firm performance has suffered, a new CEO is best suited to lead the firmʼs creative endeavors. On the other hand, among firms that retain their existing CEO after a decline in performance, manipulating the CEOʼs compensation package is a common governance practice used by boards to encourage innovation. In these cases, some have argued that increasing the CEOʼs pay will encourage corporate entrepreneurship, because the CEO has been compensated for assuming additional risk. Counter to these propositions, this study develops theoretical arguments that a firmʼs existing CEO is better equipped to foster corporate entrepreneurship and that this probability increases when the CEOʼs cash compensation is decreased. Results from a sample of 100 single-product manufacturing firms suggest firms that retain their current CEO and decrease the CEOʼs cash compensation are most likely to engage in corporate entrepreneurship. Implications that this research has for corporate entrepreneurship, corporate governance, and firm performance are discussed.

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New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Allan F. Lichter

As on previous occasions, the editors of the New England Journal of Entrepreneurship have sought to interview local small businessowners as well as entrepreneurs who have…

Abstract

As on previous occasions, the editors of the New England Journal of Entrepreneurship have sought to interview local small businessowners as well as entrepreneurs who have national reputations. One such small business operator is Allan Lichter, coowner of Millennium Graphics in Bridgeport, Connecticut. Mr. Lichterʼs story is certainly unique to him and to his partner, but readers may resonate with portions of this story as to how challenging it can be to surmount the ups and downs of the business cycle.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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